HIGH SCHOOL: K to 12 Curriculum Guides – National Connections Academy

National Connections Academy’s (NaCA) full course listing below is a comprehensive look at every course available in high school. Order NaCA’s free program guideto learn more about Connections Academy’s course offerings! As indicated in the previous post, National Connections Academy (NaCA) K–12 Curriculum guides may be comprehensive, engaging, inspiring, award-winning and parent-acclaimed. However we trust our teachers will exercise extreme caution in evaluating the materials and in discriminating against any perceived undesirable elements of these guides. At all times, integrating local elements that build upon our ultimate curriculum goals should be the top priority.

WARNING!!!!!  THE FOLLOWING HIGH SCHOOL COURSE GUIDE BY NATIONAL CONNECTIONS ACADEMY IS BEING POSTED HERE FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY:

High School Core Courses

AP English Language & Composition A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
The AP Language and Composition course will provide high school students with college level instruction in studying and writing various kinds of analytic or persuasive essays on literary and nonliterary topics in language, rhetoric and expository writing. Students will become skilled readers of prose written in various periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts. Both their reading and writing should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way writing conventions and language contribute to effectiveness in writing. This course will effectively prepare students for the AP Exam by enabling them to read, comprehend, and write about complex texts, while developing further communication skills on a college level.

Units:

Early Edition
Most of Unit 1 is devoted to teaching you how to work in the AP English Language course. You learn about course organization, submitting work, and much more.

Colonial Revolutionary Edition
In this unit, you learn about early Americans through their writings and speeches, while sharpening your reading and writing skills. You also work on vocabulary development.

Romantic Edition
In this unit, you study literature from the years 1830-1861. This period is known as American Romanticism. You learn about Transcendentalism, along with a wide range of writers and their works as you continue to work on writing skills and vocabulary.

Civil War Edition

In this unit, you will study literature from the years 1830-1861. This period is known as the Civil War. Along with studying the causes and effects of the Civil War through readings, you will be exposed to poetry of the era. You will also work on understanding humor and imagery. As always you will continue working on writing skills and vocabulary.

AP English Language & Composition B

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of AP English Language & Composition A

Description:
The AP Language and Composition course will provide high school students with college level instruction in studying and writing various kinds of analytic or persuasive essays on literary and nonliterary topics in language, rhetoric and expository writing. Students will become skilled readers of prose written in various periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts. Both their reading and writing should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way writing conventions and language contribute to effectiveness in writing. This course will effectively prepare students for the AP Exam by enabling them to read, comprehend, and write about complex texts, while developing further communication skills on a college level.

Units:

Regionalism/Realism/Naturalism

This unit will focus on the three literary movements sweeping the nation after the Civil War: regionalism, realism and naturalism. You will look at the influence that the Civil War had on the writings of the time. You will also analyze point of view while working on your writing skills and vocabulary.

Modern Edition

In this unit, you study literature from the Modern Age. This encompasses the period between the years 1914-1946. You learn how literature was affected by the economic and social changes of the time, along with reading about the literary contributions from the Harlem Renaissance. You also analyze narrative structure while working on writing and vocabulary.

Contemporary Edition

In this unit, you will study contemporary writers. The period begins after the Second World War and extends to the present. You will look at how modern writers address the issues of equality, identity and other issues of humankind, along with rhetorical elements in nonfiction writing. You will also complete a timed essay to practice for the AP Exam.

Student Edition

This is the last lesson-based unit in the course. You will create your own virtual newspaper based on your choice of a novel or play from a given list.

AP English Literature & Composition A

Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

Credits: 0.50

Description:
For a year, the student will participate in an AP upscale dining experience in the AP Literature and Composition course. The student will act as a food critic of exquisite literary cuisine. Menu items include reading, analyzing, writing, rewriting, and discussing creations by the master chefs, renowned authors. With intensive concentration on composition skills and on authors’ narrative techniques, this dining experience equips the student with recipes for success in college, in a career, and on the AP exam.

Units:

Welcome

You will participate in pre-dinner banter as you sample dramatic poems, develop literary characters and seek to understand literary devices. Using your critic’s voice, you will learn how to analyze and judge certain aspects of literary works.

Beverage Course

You will participate in pre-dinner banter as you sample dramatic poems, develop literary characters and seek to understand literary devices. Using your critic’s voice, you will learn how to analyze and judge certain aspects of literary works.

Appetizer Course

In this unit, you have the chance to get your fingers on some literature that will tickle your taste buds. Examining the struggles of humanity, the American dream, community, and self-identity, you will critique your way through the second course of your feast.

Soup Course

In this unit you will get to dive into a variety of poems.

Salad Course

This unit contains literary works whose primary focus is romantic love. You will really enjoy this module, as you have a number of choices in reading materials and you will enjoy discussing the ups and downs of romance.

AP English Literature & Composition B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of AP English Lit A

Description:
For a year, the student will participate in an AP upscale dining experience in the AP Literature and Composition course. The students will act as food critics of exquisite literary cuisine. Menu items include reading, analyzing, writing, rewriting, and discussing creations by the master chefs, renowned authors. With intensive concentration on composition skills and on authors’ narrative techniques, this dining experience equips the student with the recipes for success in college, in a career, and on the AP exam.

Units:

Cheese Plate

You will be reading works that examine family dynamics and relationships.

Sorbet

The work of a sorbet is refreshing and palate cleansing before the arrival of the main dish. This unit is filled with the tastes of temptation, chance, family tragedy, and madness. Venture through this section with the Prince of Denmark as your server!

Entreé

If you are looking for a deep dish, the entree is a great choice. Dine daringly as we explore the struggles, perceptions, and challenges facing the women in this unit.

Dessert

The dessert menu offers you delectable choices swirled with humor, laced with irony, and drizzled with satire.

Potluck Dinner Party

You will host the dinner party they you been planning throughout the last couple of units. As Jay Gatsby says in the unit introduction, you will use this party as a time to review the dishes you have sampled throughout your dining experience and to contemplate how the new dishes you’ve chosen for the party connect to the ones you’ve already tasted.

After the Party

There are no new assignments in this unit. Rather, Unit 6 serves to review terms and concepts for you before you take the AP Exam and complete the course. The semester two exam is also in this unit.

English 9 A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the first of two courses that comprise English 9. In this course, the student will take an in-depth look at a variety of literature selections. In reading and responding to these diverse selections, the student will gain a thorough understanding of fiction and nonfiction genres, including short stories, essays, poetry, and drama. The student will also read Jack London’s The Call of the Wild. This selection enables the student to explore universal themes and make connections between the characters’ experiences and his own. Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird may be read instead of The Call of the Wild. Writing instruction focuses on analytical and expository writing but also provides opportunities for the student to write creatively.

Units:

Growing Up

In this unit, you will analyze fiction, nonfiction, and poetry selections focused on the theme of growing up. As you read, you will apply active reading strategies, such as making inferences and forming personal connections with the text. You will also learn to understand and analyze elements of prose and poetry, such as point of view, character, setting, symbolism, and metaphor. Throughout the unit, you will also learn strategies for learning new vocabulary, such as understanding word roots, prefixes, and suffixes. Grammar instruction will focus on reviewing the eight parts of speech. Finally, you will develop your writing skills as you create a personal narrative.

The Forces of Nature

In this unit, you will analyze fiction, nonfiction, and poetry selections about the natural world, with a focus on nonfiction selections. As you read, you will apply active reading strategies such as analyzing details and using text features and graphics to understand informational texts. You will also learn to understand and analyze elements of prose and poetry such as imagery, irony, figurative language, and text structure. Throughout the unit, you will also learn strategies for learning new vocabulary, with a focus on using context clues and understanding multiple-meaning words. Grammar instruction will focus on understanding the components of a sentence and using different sentence types. Finally, you will develop your writing skills as you create a descriptive essay.

The Call of the Wild

Jack London’s The Call of the Wild follows the journey of Buck, a magnificent St. Bernard/Scotch shepherd dog, as he is kidnapped from comfortable surroundings and thrown into the harsh frontier life of the 1897 gold rush in the arctic North. You will read of how he not only adapts to new conditions but also awakens to ancient instincts as he triumphs despite and amidst the new challenges of his changing environment. In this unit, you will identify and analyze literary elements, discover new vocabulary terms, and use comprehension strategies to make connections and draw conclusions.

The Call of the Wild is the recommended novel for English 9. Harper Lee’s novel To Kill a Mockingbird may be read instead of The Call of the Wild with prior teacher approval. Lessons and activities for To Kill a Mockingbird will appear on the lower half of the page, as seen below. Do not proceed with To Kill a Mockingbird unless you have received approval from your teacher.

Other Worlds

In this unit, you will read and analyze works of science fiction that depict imaginary worlds. Additionally, you will read essays that explore how science fiction and video games have influenced our culture. As you read, you will continue to apply active reading strategies, such as analyzing details and summarizing, to help prepare you to critique these texts. You will analyze how the elements of short stories are used in the science-fiction genre and compare stories within this genre before writing a critical response to a short story. Throughout the unit, you will also learn strategies for understanding scientific and technical vocabulary in context. Grammar instruction will focus on using punctuation correctly and following standard conventions for using italics and quotation marks.

Crossing Borders

In this unit, you will read and analyze works of fiction and nonfiction that explore the theme of crossing borders. These borders may be physical—for instance, the geographical borders between two countries—or psychological. You will apply active reading strategies such as making predictions, understanding text structures, and understanding the author’s purpose. You will analyze writers’ use of figurative language, dialect, and tone, as well as their techniques for developing conflict. As part of your exploration of the theme of crossing borders, you will write an informational essay about a cultural tradition. Throughout the unit, you will also practice the strategies for understanding vocabulary that you have learned throughout the semester. Grammar instruction will focus on phrases and clauses.

Semester Exam

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText E Guide to Language, Writing, & Literature
  • ¥ iText Pathways: Literature for Readers and Writers
  • ¥ iText Romeo and Juliet
  • ¥ iText The Call of the Wild

English 9 B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the second of two courses that comprise English 9. In this course, the student continues to explore a variety of literature selections from world literature, including well-known works. The student will learn strategies for reading epic poetry and study the characteristics of suspense stories. Also, the student will analyze the elements of drama as he reads William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. George Orwell’s Animal Farm may be read instead of Romeo and Juliet.

Writing instruction focuses on analytical and expository writing including in-depth instruction in the process of writing a research paper. This project teaches the student to critically analyze primary and secondary sources and to effectively support his ideas with information gathered from outside sources.

Units:

Echoes from the Past

In this unit, you will analyze fiction, nonfiction, and poetry selections focused on ancient myths and literature. As you read, you will apply active reading strategies, such as making inferences and forming personal connections with the text. You will also learn to understand and analyze elements of epic poetry such as myth, figurative language, character, and tone. Throughout the unit, you will also learn strategies for learning new vocabulary, such as understanding multiple-meaning words and using a dictionary. Grammar instruction will focus on reviewing the use of pronouns. Finally, you will develop your writing skills as you create a summary for one of the selections in this unit.

Romeo and Juliet

William Shakespeare’s classic tragedy Romeo and Juliet tells the story of two youths desperately in love with each other despite the feud that exists between their two families. They are secretly married, but on the same day as their marriage, Romeo is banished for killing Juliet’s kinsman. While he is gone, Juliet fakes her death by taking a poisonous potion in order to avoid an arranged marriage. Romeo does not learn in time that she is not really dead, and kills himself as a result. Upon waking, Juliet discovers Romeo and joins him in death. Through Shakespeare’s timeless story, you will identify and analyze literary and dramatic elements, discover new vocabulary terms, and use comprehension strategies to make connections and draw conclusions.

Romeo and Juliet is the recommended text for English 9. George Orwell’s novel Animal Farm may be read instead of Romeo and Juliet with prior teacher approval. Lessons and activities for Animal Farm will appear on the lower half of the lesson pages.

The Dark Side

In this unit, you will analyze fiction, nonfiction, and poetry selections belonging to the suspense and horror genres. As you read, you will apply active reading strategies, such as making predictions and asking questions to better understand the text. You will also learn to understand and analyze elements of suspense and horror narratives such as foreshadowing, stock characters and archetypes, and the role of unreliable narrators. You will also examine literary elements such as poetic devices and tone. Throughout the unit, you will also learn strategies for learning new vocabulary, such as understanding denotation and connotation and the use of archaic language. Grammar instruction will focus on reviewing the rules of subject-verb agreement and the use of adjectives and adverbs.

The Research Paper

In this unit, you will develop important reading and analytical writing skills as you research and write about a topic of your choice. The lessons in the unit are planned to guide you through the challenging but rewarding process of writing a research paper. You will complete this project in three main phases:

  • ¥ forming research questions and gathering information
  • ¥ organizing and analyzing your research findings
  • ¥ combining your own ideas with information from your research to create an effective, well-supported research paper

This unit differs from other units in the English 9 course in that it includes fewer reading assignments from your textbooks. Most of the reading you complete will be conducted as part of your research. Please note that it is especially important that you complete and turn in writing assignments consistently throughout this unit, since each new assignment builds on the work completed previously. Completing assignments on time and in order will help ensure that you have adequate time to develop and refine your ideas and to incorporate feedback from your teacher.

What Has Value?

In this unit, you will read fiction and poetry selections that analyze people’s differing values. As you read, you will apply active reading strategies, such as comparing texts and differentiating between fact and opinion. You will also learn to understand and analyze literary elements such as theme, tone, plot twist, and repetition. Throughout the unit, you will also review strategies for learning new vocabulary, such as understanding multiple-meaning words and using a dictionary. Finally, grammar instruction will focus on reviewing the skills taught earlier in the semester.

Semester Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam for the concepts you learned throughout the semester. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText E Guide to Language, Writing, & Literature
  • ¥ iText Pathways: Literature for Readers and Writers
  • ¥ iText Romeo and Juliet
  • ¥ iText The Call of the Wild

English 10 A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the first of two courses that comprise English 10. In this course, the student will explore the timeless themes of world literature, including works from the Americas, Europe, and Africa. In reading these diverse selections, the student will gain a thorough understanding of fiction genres, including classics, contemporary fiction, poetry, and drama. The student will also read Mark Twain’s  Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. John Steinbeck’s novella Of Mice and Men may be read instead of  Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. In reading these American literature selections and creating a multimedia presentation, the student will understand longer works of literature in their historical and literary context. Writing instruction guides the student through the process of composing expository and analytical essays. It also provides opportunities for the student to write creatively; the student will compose a short story and poem.

Throughout the course, the student expands his vocabulary in context. The mastery of both critical vocabulary and grammar skills helps the student become a more thoughtful and effective reader and writer.

Units:

The Literature of the Americas

In this unit, you will not only read a selection of literary works from the Western hemisphere, but you will also analyze literary concepts such as theme, tone, mood, and dramatic irony. You will explore fictional stories, drama, and poetry as well as nonfiction essays and famous United States historical documents. During your study of grammar, you will review the eight parts of speech and apply your knowledge of those as you compose summaries, multi-paragraph essays and an informal letter. You will use a wide variety of study skills to master the concepts covered in this unit.

The Literature of the Americas II

In Unit 1, you read selections from several writers in the Americas. You learned about literary techniques such as tone, theme, imagery, and stage direction. In Unit 2, you will continue reading short stories and poems written by authors from the Americas.

Selections in this unit include writings by authors from St. Lucia, Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Brazil, Argentina, and Chile. The stories cover topics such as reconciliation, death, acceptance, anger, and relationships. There is a wealth of insight and emotion in the writings. As you read, you will learn new literary elements such as paradox, personification, and situational irony. You will also become familiar with additional techniques such as magical realism and repetition, which enable literature to engage an audience from beginning to end. In this unit, you will write a compare and contrast essay on a topic of your choice. You will select a topic, create a rough draft, revise, and edit your essay over the course of the unit. Additionally, you will review and apply your knowledge on the components of sentences and common sentence errors.

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is the story of a free-thinking kid, Huck Finn, and a slave named Jim, both of whom choose to flee their oppressive lives. The two set out on a trip down the Mississippi River that is filled with adventures and experiences that are unique to the particular class of characters and setting of the mid-nineteenth century. The novel’s title is sometimes extended to include Tom Sawyer’s Comrade to indicate to readers that this is a companion novel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, told as a first-person narrative from Huck’s point of view. Prior knowledge of Tom Sawyer is not required. In this unit, you will identify literary elements, analyze characters, use comprehension strategies to make connections and draw conclusions, and define unfamiliar vocabulary words. You will also create a multimedia presentation for Unit 3’s portfolio assessment.

Of Mice and Men may be read instead of the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn with prior teacher approval. Lessons and activities for Of Mice and Men will appear on the lower half of the page. Do not proceed with Of Mice and Men unless you have received approval from your teacher.Of Mice and Men is the story of two men, George Milton and Lennie Small, living a hardscrabble existence as migrant workers during the Great Depression. Smart and practical, George has spent years looking after Lennie. Lennie is hardworking and kind, but feeble-minded. Each man is the only “family” the other one has. As George and Lennie move from place to place and job to job, they hope to save enough money to buy a place of their own. Soon their dream seems within reach, but forces beyond their control threaten to ruin their hopes forever. In this unit, you will identify literary elements, analyze characters, use comprehension strategies to make connections and draw conclusions, and define unfamiliar vocabulary words. You will also create a multimedia presentation for Unit 3’s portfolio assessment.

Europe I

Europe has endured many conflicts that have influenced its literature—world wars, the Holocaust, and the collapse of the Soviet Union are examples. Writers are among the first targets of totalitarian regimes. Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, who was twice sent to Siberia, is one of many European authors who were exiled, imprisoned, or silenced. However, he refused to stop criticizing Russia’s Communist regime, believing that “literature that is not the breath of contemporary society, that dares not transmit the pains and fears of that society, that does not warn in time against threatening moral and social dangers—such literature does not deserve the name of literature; it is only a façade. Such literature loses the confidence of its own people, and its published works are used as wastepaper instead of being read.”In this unit, you will read, analyze, and interpret selections that express some of the hopes, disappointments, and fears of the writers and of the citizens of the European states, including W.H. Auden and Graham Greene. You will continue to develop your writing skills as you compose an expository essay.

Selections include writings such as the following:

  • ¥ “from Ten Songs”, a poem by W. H. Auden, which looks at his perceptions of what was happening in Germany during the time of Hitler
  • ¥ “The Destructors,” a story by Graham Greene, which offers an English man’s perspective on the effects of World War II

As you read, you will learn new literary terms, such as rhyme scheme and allusion. You will be introduced to different character types, such as round characters, flat characters, and stock characters. You will also write an expository essay—andother type of writing that you can add to your growing portfolio. Additionally, you will review and apply your knowledge of a variety of grammatical phrases, such as prepositional, appositive, participial, gerund, and infinitive .

Europe II

In this unit, you will continue to read selections that express some of the hopes, disappointments, and fears of the writers and of the citizens of the European states. Selections you will read include a fable, short stories, one short story adapted from a play, and poetry from European writers. As you read, you will learn literary devices used to create compelling stories or poems such as: allegory, author’s purpose, character development, dialogue, and hyperbole. You will also practice using various clauses and different kinds of sentence structures to enhance your writing. Additionally, you will create a personal narrative about a subject of your choice and have the opportunity to draft a couple of different business communications in the form of a letter of complaint and a letter of application.

Africa

The African continent includes more than 50 countries and more than 800 languages. The writers you will study in this unit, who come from various regions of Africa, faced the challenge of telling their stories in languages that honor their heritage while reaching a wide audience. Most authors write in French and English, the languages spoken by European colonizers. But one, Kenyan author Ngugi wa Thiong’o, writes primarily in his native language, Gikuyu.You will read stories that reflect the authors’ analyses of life before and after colonization. They deal with subjects such as the griot storytelling tradition, the clash of European and African cultures, and the pervasive effects of apartheid. Selections you will read include an epic poem, a first-person narrative, and several short stories. As you read, you will learn about literary devices that writers use to create interesting stories and poems. These devices include personification, plot, tone, characterization, humor, theme, and setting. You will also practice using various verb forms and learn how to strengthen your writing through the use of vivid verbs. Additionally, you will learn elements of poetry such as sound devices, rhythm, meter, and figurative language; you will also explore various forms that poems can take. Finally, you will use the information you learned about poetry to create a poem.

Semester Review and Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam on the concepts you learned throughout the semester. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Reading the World
  • ¥ iText The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  • ¥ iText The Importance of Being Earnest
  • ¥ iText Writing with Power 10 (Yellow) Student Ed

English 10 B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the second of two courses that comprise English 10. In this course, the student will continue to explore the timeless themes of world literature, including works from Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and the Pacific Rim. In reading these diverse selections, the student will gain a thorough understanding of fiction genres, including classics, contemporary fiction, poetry, and drama. The student will also read Oscar Wilde’s play The Importance of Being Earnest. George Bernard Shaw’s play Pygmalion may be read instead of The Importance of Being Earnest. In reading these British plays and composing a dramatic scene, the student will understand drama in its historical and literary context.Writing instruction guides the student through the process of composing a descriptive portrait, a research paper, and a persuasive speech. Throughout the course, the student expands his vocabulary in context. The mastery of both critical vocabulary and grammar skills helps the student become a more thoughtful and effective reader and writer.

Units:

The Importance of Being Earnest

In this unit, you will read and analyze the The Importance of Being Earnest, a play in which the characters hold the pursuit of pleasure above all other goals. As you read, you will relate the play to the Victorian culture in which the playwright, Oscar Wilde, lived, as well as to the comedies of the Restoration era. You will also analyze characterization, symbolism, and irony in the play.

The Importance of Being Earnest is the recommended play for English 10. George Bernard Shaw’s play Pygmalion may be read instead of The Importance of Being Earnest with prior teacher approval. Lessons and activities for Pygmalion will appear on the lower half of the page. Do not proceed with Pygmalion unless you have received approval from your teacher.

In Pygmalion, George Bernard Shaw scrutinizes various layers of English society in a romantic comedy. The play’s title alludes to a transformation that the Shaw’s characters undergo. Eliza Doolittle, a poor but scrappy flower girl, and Henry Higgins, a professor, wrestle with issues of identity, independence, class, character, and self-respect to create a play that remains relevant almost a century later.

Middle East and South Asia I

The literature of the Middle East and South Asia—including Algeria, Armenia, Egypt, India, Iraq, Israel, Palestine, Syria, and Turkey—provides rich insight into a culture marked by diverse traditions, religions, and languages, as well as a long history of conflicts. Today the region grapples with both ancient and modern ways of life as people balance preserving tradition with adopting new attitudes and customs influenced by Western culture.

In this unit, you will read literature that investigates the values, perspectives, and everyday experiences of people in the Middle East and South Asia. You will explore traditional and contemporary cultural attitudes about family roles, marriage, gender, and religious devotion, as well as the conflicts that arise as people navigate old and new ways of doing things. As you read and analyze the short stories and poems in this unit, you will consider the cultural contexts of the texts and identify and analyze symbolism, humor, and sensory details. After learning about descriptive writing, you will write a descriptive portrait. Throughout the unit, you will continue to develop and practice strategies for understanding vocabulary. Grammar will focus on using pronouns correctly.

Middle East and South Asia II

In this unit, you’ll continue your study of the literature of the Middle East and South Asia and continue to make comparisons between cultures while you come to appreciate the similarities among all people. You’ll also receive a quick primer on online communications and Internet safety. Grammar instruction will focus on subject and verb agreement in a number of different cases. Finally, you’ll work on a research proposal to submit to your portfolio.

The Research Paper

In Unit 3, you prepared a research proposal that focused on some cultural aspect of one of the countries (Turkey, Armenia, Iraq, India, or Sri Lanka) that was the focus of that unit. You limited your topic and researched and evaluated sources. In Unit 4, you will learn the process of creating a research paper based on that proposal. You will cover the steps from prewriting to editing as you work to create a final draft. In addition, you will learn about properly using adverbs and adjectives and begin a review of common usage issues.

Nonfiction: Persuasion

In Unit 5, you will explore persuasive techniques used in nonfiction writing and create your own nonfiction persuasive speech. You’ll work on using persuasive techniques to develope arguments and learn how to speak in a public forum. Your grammar focus will be capitalization, end marks, and commas.

East Asia and the Pacific Rim

In Unit 6, you will study literature from East Asia and the Pacific Rim, which includes such countries as Japan, China, Korea, Vietnam, Australia, and New Zealand. As you read, you will learn that the main theme of the literature from this region of the world is the region’s relationship with the West. During this unit, you will compose a literary analysis that explores an author’s purpose in a piece of literature of your choice. Finally, you’ll study the use of italics, quotation marks, hyphens, and semicolons for your grammar review.

Semester Exam

In this unit, you will prepare for and take the semester exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it will cover the following areas: Middle East and South Asia, East Asia and the Pacific Rim, and the writing processes for research and persuasive writing. Applying the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with the multiple choice, matching, short answer, and essay questions on the semester exam.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Reading the World
  • ¥ iText The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  • ¥ iText The Importance of Being Earnest
  • ¥ iText Writing with Power 10 (Yellow) Student Ed

English 11 A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the first of two courses that comprise English 11. In this course, the student will focus on the literary movements that comprise American literature, and trace the chronology of national literature from the early American and colonial period through the periods of Realism and Regionalism. In reading these diverse selections, the student will gain a thorough understanding of fiction, including short stories, poetry and drama; as well as nonfiction genres, including the oral tradition, seminal historical documents, and speeches. The student will also read Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee’s play The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail. Arthur Miller’s play The Crucible may be read instead of The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail. In reading these American plays and composing a dramatic scene, the student will understand drama in its historical and literary context.

Writing instruction guides the student through the process of composing a descriptive essay and modeling the style of an American author. Throughout the course, the student expands his vocabulary in context. The mastery of both critical vocabulary and grammar skills helps the student become a more thoughtful and effective reader and writer.

Units:

Early American and Colonial Literature

In Unit 1, Early American and Colonial Literature, you will examine the concept of a national literature and read different genres that comprise the national literary heritage of the United States. You will read and explore the ideas and writing of the New World’s earliest inhabitants, visitors, and settlers. You will also analyze strategies for persuasive writing as well as the denotative and connotative meanings of vocabulary words in context. Additionally, this unit will give you practice in composing timed writings.

American Romanticism

In Unit 2, American Romanticism (1820s–1850s), you will read and analyze the short stories of Nathaniel Hawthorne and Edgar Allan Poe as well as the poetry of Walt Whitman. You will also study the subgenre of Transcendentalism. Henry David Thoreau’s “Walden” will model the descriptive writing you will compose for your first portfolio assessment.

The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail

In Unit 3, you will read and analyze an American drama. The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail is a play in two acts written in 1970 by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee. The play is comprised of shifting scenes from the real and imagined life of American writer and philosopher Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862). Arrested on July 23, 1846 for failure to pay his taxes, Henry David Thoreau spent one night in jail. The play dramatizes that night, intercutting scenes in which Henry interacts with his cellmate with flashbacks to events from the years leading up to the date of his arrest.

For the second portfolio assessment, you will compose a dramatic scene.

The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail is the recommended play for English 11. Arthur Miller’s play The Crucible may be read instead of The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail with prior teacher approval. Lessons and activities for The Crucible will appear on the lower half of the lesson pages. Do not proceed with The Crucible unless you have received prior approval from your teacher.

Realism and Regionalism

In Unit 4, Realism and Regionalism (1860–1914), you will read, analyze, and interpret the short stories of American Realist and Regionalist authors, as well as the poetry of Emily Dickinson. As you examine of this literature, you will consider dialect, flashback, characterization, figurative language, and other devices used by Realist authors. During this unit, you will gain practice correctly using apostrophes and possessive pronouns. For your third portfolio assessment, you will select an American short story from Unit 2 or 4 and compose an alternate ending in the style of the original author.

Semester Review and Exam

In this unit, you will prepare for and take the semester exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it will cover the following units: Early American and Colonial Literature, American Romanticism, The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail, Realism and Regionalism. Applying the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with the multiple choice, matching, short answer, and essay questions on the semester exam.

Kit

  • ¥ LA Novel Kit G11 (Thoreau & Gatsby)

Novel

  • ¥ The Great Gatsby
  • ¥ The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText American Short Stories
  • ¥ iText Multicultural II
  • ¥ iText Writing with Power 11 (Green) Student Ed

English 11 B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the second of two courses that comprise English 11. In this course, the student will focus on the literary movements that comprise American literature, and trace the chronology of national literature from the Modernist through the Contemporary period. In reading and responding to these diverse literature selections, the student will gain a thorough understanding of a myriad of fiction and nonfiction genres, including short stories, essays, poetry, drama, memoirs, and autobiographies. The student will also read F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby. Ernest Hemingway’s novella The Old Man and the Sea may be read instead of The Great Gatsby. In reading these American literature selections, the student will understand longer works of literature in their historical and literary context.

Writing instruction guides the student through the process of composing a literary analysis and a research paper. Throughout the course, the student expands his vocabulary in context. The mastery of both critical vocabulary and grammar skills helps the student become a more thoughtful and effective reader and writer.

Units:

Voices of Modernism (1920s–1940s)

In this unit, you will study the modernism movement, which occurred from the 1920s to the 1940s. You will read and analyze the short stories of authors such as John Steinbeck and F. Scott Fitzgerald and the poetry of authors suh as Robert Frost. You will also practice identifying and using different types of verb forms and clauses, as well s independentand subordinate clauses. For your portfolio assessment, you will apply your research and writing capabilities to compose a literary analysis showcasing your analytical and synthesizing skills.

Post War Voices Emerge (1950s–1960s)

In Unit 2, you will enter the tumultuous times of post-World War II, during which time many people fought for change and rights were being demanded. This time in history saw the emergence of literature that voiced people’s discontent with the mundane life of traditionalism and a desire for a break in conventional living. In this unit, you will read and analyze the short stories of Kurt Vonnegut and John Updike as well as Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech and poetry by writers of the Beat Generation. You will also identify elements of adjectival clauses. Your portfolio assessment for this unit will be a comparison-and-contrast essay in which you analyze the work of two authors.

The Great Gatsby

In this unit, you will examine the narrative structure of The Great Gatsby, a novel that depicts life among the rich during the Roaring Twenties in New York. As you read, you will analyze point of view as well as how such literary devices as symbols and allusions enhance the meaning of the novel. For your portfolio project, you will write a self-improvement plan for the narrator of the novel. The Great Gatsby is the recommended novel for English 11. Ernest Hemingway’s novella The Old Man and the Sea may be read instead of The Great Gatsby with prior teacher approval. Lessons and activities for The Old Man and the Sea will appear on the lower half of the page. Do not proceed with The Old Man and the Sea unless you have received approval from your teacher.

Contemporary Postmodernism

In this unit, you will study a variety of voices from contemporary postmodernism movement. The fight against racial and ethnic injustices took center stage during this literary movement that took place from the 1960s to the 1980s. You will read poetry and prose from authors of several different backgrounds whose writings contributed to the mosaic of the American culture. In this unit, you will also practice identifying the principal parts of verbs and using the six verb tenses as well as different voices and moods of verbs. For your portfolio assignment, you will compose a memoir.

The Research Paper

In Unit 5, you will have the opportunity to become an authority on a subject by creating your own research report. Working through the writing process, you will select a topic, evaluate sources and conduct research, cite sources properly, draft a report, and revise and edit the report before publishing it and submitting it for your portfolio. You will also read and analyze several nonfiction essays by writers of diverse backgrounds. In addition, you will continue to learn about verb forms and tenses.

Semester Review and Exam

In this unit, you will prepare for and take the semester exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it will cover the following units: Modernism, Postmodernism, The Great Gatsby, and Contemporary Postmodernism.Applying the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with the multiple choice, matching, true/false, and essay questions on the semester exam. Evaluating how you did on the first semester exam—identifying areas of weakness and strength—can also help you be successful on this semester’s exam.

Kit

  • ¥ LA Novel Kit G11 (Thoreau & Gatsby)

Novel

  • ¥ The Great Gatsby
  • ¥ The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText American Short Stories
  • ¥ iText Multicultural II
  • ¥ iText Writing with Power 11 (Green) Student Ed

English 12 A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the first of two courses that comprise English 12. In this course, the student will take an in-depth look at early British literature from 449 to 1798 and will examine literary forms including the epic, poetry, drama, and the essay. The student will also read longer selections of literature that are representative of the historical setting, including Shakespeare’s Macbeth. The student will read to gain an understanding and appreciation of the historical context from which the literature arose. Vocabulary development and mastery of critical grammar and communication skills prepare the student for writing creative narratives, and expository and persuasive essays.

Units:

The Anglo-Saxon Period: 449–1066

In this unit, you will read the earliest works of English literature. More than a millennium old, many of these works were passed down orally for centuries before they were written down. Anglo-Saxon literature includes lyric poems that express emotion, as well as the earliest epic poem of the English language, Beowulf, which presents the adventures of a hero who is larger than life. Additionally, you will read poems from The Exeter Book, a collection of Anglo-Saxon poetry preserved in manuscript form and dating back to the middle of the tenth century. Finally, you will use the writing process to compose a description based on a scene from Beowulf.

The Middle Ages: 1066–1485

In this unit, you will read literary works composed during the medieval era. These include Chaucer’s narrative poem The Canterbury Tales, which presents various figures of medieval English society and the tales they tell while traveling on a long journey, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, a narrative poem based on the legends of King Arthur and his court. As you read, you will learn to analyze such literary elements as character, the narrator’s voice and perspective, and tone. You will also learn about and examine the historical, social, and cultural climate of the Middle Ages by identifying causes and effects. Finally, you will use the writing process to write an allegory, an extended metaphor in the form of a short story.

Macbeth

In Unit 3, you will read Shakespeare’s tragic tale of the rise and fall of Macbeth, a fierce and loyal Scottish warrior is tempted by the prophecies of several witches and by his own ambitions to become king. Macbeth and his wife alternately collaborate and contend over the proper approach to achieve their ambitions. Macbeth, the tragic hero, discovers too late the dangers of unchecked ambition. As you read, you will analyze and interpret the dramatic structure of Macbeth, define words in context, and compose a persuasive essay.

Macbeth is the recommended play for English 12. Shakespeare’s comedy Twelfth Night may be read instead of Macbeth with prior teacher approval. Lessons and activities for Twelfth Night will appear on the lower half of the lesson pages. Do not proceed wtih Twelfth Night unless you have received approval from your teacher.

The Renaissance: 1485–1660

In this unit, you will read literary works composed during the English Renaissance. These include a variety of poetic genres, including sonnets and lyric, pastoral, metaphysical, and epic poetry. As you read, you will learn to analyze such poetic elements as speaker, figurative language, and tone. You will also learn about and examine the historical, social, and cultural climate of the Renaissance by making generalizations about that period. Finally, you will use the writing process to write an expository essay on a subject of your choice.

The Restoration and the Enlightenment: 1660–1798

In this unit, you will read literary works composed during the Restoration and the Enlightenment periods. These include a variety of fiction, nonfiction, and poetic genres including diaries, mock epics, satires, and elegies. As you read, you will learn to analyze elements such as point of view, irony, and imagery. You will also learn about and examine the historical, social, and cultural climate of the Restoration and the Enlightenment by classifying information, or arranging ideas into fitting categories. Finally, you will use the writing process to write a poem using a specified form.

Semester Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam on the concepts you learned throughout the semester. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText British Literature
  • ¥ iText Frankenstein
  • ¥ iText Writing with Power 12 (Teal) Student Edition

English 12 B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the second of two courses that comprise English 12. In this course, the student continues to explore a variety of literature selections from British literature, including well-known works. The student will learn strategies for reading lyric poetry and study the characteristics of reflective essays. The student will analyze poetry, short stories, and essays from the Romantic Period, Victorian Age, and Modern Era and will determine how the historical context affected the thematic material and writing style from each era.

Writing instruction focuses on literary analysis, including in-depth instruction in the process of writing a research paper. This project teaches the student to critically analyze primary and secondary sources and to effectively support his ideas with information gathered from outside sources.

Units:

The Romantic Period: 1798–1832

This unit explores element of dialect poetry and lyrical poetry during the Romantic period, and the Romantic sensibility expressed in the poems of the time.

Frankenstein

Frankenstein is the story of a young man, Victor Frankenstein, who becomes obsessed with studying anatomy and determined to understand how life is created. Passionate about science and dedicated to his dream, he creates a living being; however, his success dramatically affects his life and the lives of his family and friends. The details of Victor’s life are shared through letters from Robert Walton, an English explorer on an expedition to the North Pole, to his sister Margaret Seville in England. Robert learns Victor’s tragic tale when he rescues Victor, who is traveling by himself in the Arctic.

In this unit, you will identify literary elements, analyze characters, use comprehension strategies to make connections and draw conclusions, and define unfamiliar vocabulary words.

Frankenstein is the recommended novel for English 12. Jane Austen’s novel Pride and Prejudice may be read instead of Frankenstein with prior teacher approval. Lessons and activities for Pride and Prejudice will appear on the lower half of the lesson pages.

Published in 1813, Pride and Prejudice is the story of a middle-class English family, the Bennets. Mr. and Mrs. Bennet have five daughters in their teens and early twenties, and the family’s security depends on the girls’ prospects for marriage. Austen’s novel focuses primarily on the second-eldest of the sisters, the passionate and outspoken Elizabeth, and her relationship with Fitzwilliam Darcy, a wealthy bachelor. In relating the romantic adventures of Elizabeth and her sisters, Austen provides a detailed account of love and marriage at the end of the eighteenth century.In this unit, you will identify literary elements, analyze characters, use comprehension strategies to make connections and draw conclusions, and define unfamiliar vocabulary words.

Writing a Research Paper

The Unit guides student through the process of developing a research paper. Students are asked to create a multimedia presentation based on their paper and learn to interpret and implement feedback from peers and teacher.

The Victorian Age (1832–1901)

The unit explores elements, genres, and structure of Victorian poetry.

The Modern Era (1901–Present)

This unit explores the historical, social, and cultural context of the twentieth century, connecting it to the literary works of the time. You will read and analyze a variety of selections, including short stories, poems, and essays. You will also develop a literary analysis based on an aspect of the modern era.

Semester Review and Exam

In this unit, you will prepare for and take the semester exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it will cover the following units: The Romantic Period, Writing Workshop: Research Paper, The Victorian Age, and The Modern Era. Applying the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with the multiple choice, matching, short answer, and essay questions on the semester exam.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText British Literature
  • ¥ iText Frankenstein
  • ¥ iText Writing with Power 12 (Teal) Student Edition

Honors English 9 A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the first of two courses that comprise Honors English 9. In this course, the student will take an in-depth look at a variety of literature selections. In reading these diverse selections, the student will gain a thorough understanding of fiction and nonfiction genres, including short stories, essays, poetry, and drama. The student will also read Stephen Crane’s The Red Badge of Courage. This selection enables the student to explore universal themes and make connections between the characters’ experiences and his own. Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird may be read instead of The Red Badge of Courage. Writing instruction focuses on analytical and expository writing but also provides opportunities for the student to write creatively.

The Honors course includes more rigorous curriculum and provides greater opportunities for students to explore concepts, engage in independent research, and demonstrate critical thinking skills.

Units:

Growing Up

In this unit, you will analyze fiction, nonfiction, and poetry selections focused on the theme of growing up. As you read, you will apply active reading strategies, such as making inferences and forming personal connections with the text. You will also learn to understand and analyze elements of prose and poetry such as point of view, character, setting, symbolism, and metaphor. Throughout the unit, you will also learn strategies for learning new vocabulary, such as understanding word roots, prefixes, and suffixes. Grammar instruction will focus on reviewing the eight parts of speech. Finally, you will develop your writing skills as you create a personal narrative.

The Forces of Nature

In this unit, you will analyze fiction, nonfiction, and poetry selections about the natural world, with a focus on nonfiction selections. As you read, you will apply active reading strategies such as analyzing details and using text features and graphics to understand informational texts. You will also learn to understand and analyze elements of prose and poetry such as imagery, irony, figurative language, and text structure. Throughout the unit, you will also learn strategies for learning new vocabulary, with a focus on using context clues and understanding multiple-meaning words. Grammar instruction will focus on understanding the components of a sentence and using different sentence types. Finally, you will develop your writing skills as you create a descriptive essay.

The Red Badge of Courage

Stephen Crane’s The Red Badge of Courage relates a young man’s first experiences with war. Set during a Civil War battle and covering the space of only a few days, the reader sees through the eyes of new soldier Henry Fleming, seeing the frontline, hearing bullets whiz by, smelling the forest through which he tramps, and experiencing first-hand the mental and emotional challenges he faces. Crane’s novel was groundbreaking at the time of its publication for both the realism with which he portrayed war and the impressionistic overtones conveyed through the thoughts of the protagonist. In this unit, you will identify and analyze literary elements, discover new vocabulary terms, and use comprehension strategies to make connections and draw conclusions.

The Red Badge of Courage is the recommended novel for Honors English 9. Harper Lee’s novel To Kill a Mockingbird may be read instead of The Red Badge of Courage with prior teacher approval. Lessons and activities for To Kill a Mockingbird will appear on the lower half of the lesson pages.

Other Worlds

In this unit, you will read and analyze works of science fiction that depict imaginary worlds. Additionally, you will read essays that explore how science fiction and video games have influenced our culture. As you read, you will continue to apply active reading strategies, such as analyzing details and summarizing, to help prepare you to critique these texts. You will analyze how the elements of short stories are used in the science fiction genre and compare stories within this genre before writing a critical response to a short story. Throughout the unit, you will also learn strategies for understanding scientific and technical vocabulary in context. Grammar instruction will focus on using punctuation correctly and following standard conventions for using italics and quotation marks.

Crossing Borders

In this unit, you will read and analyze works of fiction and nonfiction that explore the theme of crossing borders. These borders may be physical—for instance, the geographical borders between two countries—or psychological. You will apply active reading strategies such as making predictions, understanding text structures, and understanding the author’s purpose. You will analyze writers’ use of figurative language, dialect, and tone, as well as their techniques for developing conflict. As part of your exploration of the theme of crossing borders, you will write an informational essay about a cultural tradition. Throughout the unit, you will also practice the strategies for understanding vocabulary that you have learned throughout the semester. Grammar instruction will focus on phrases and clauses.

Semester Exam

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText E Guide to Language, Writing, & Literature
  • ¥ iText Pathways: Literature for Readers and Writers
  • ¥ iText Romeo and Juliet
  • ¥ iText The Red Badge of Courage

Honors English 9 B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the second of two courses that comprise Honors English 9. In this course, the student continues to explore a variety of literature selections from world literature. The student will learn strategies for reading epic poetry and study the characteristics of suspense stories. Also, the student will analyze the elements of drama as he reads William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. George Orwell’s Animal Farm may be read instead of Romeo and Juliet.

Writing instruction focuses on analytical and expository writing, including in-depth instruction in the process of writing a research paper. This project teaches the student to critically analyze primary and secondary sources and to effectively support his ideas with information gathered from outside sources.

The Honors course includes more rigorous curriculum and provides greater opportunities for students to explore concepts, engage in independent research, and demonstrate critical thinking skills.

Units:

Echoes from the Past

In this unit, you will analyze fiction and poetry selections focused on ancient myths and literature. As you read, you will apply active reading strategies such as making inferences and forming personal connections with the text. You will also learn to understand and analyze elements of epic poetry, such as myth, figurative language, character, and tone. Throughout the unit, you will also learn strategies for learning new vocabulary, such as understanding multiple-meaning words and using a dictionary. Grammar instruction will focus on reviewing the use of pronouns. Finally, you will develop your writing skills as you create a summary for one of the selections in this unit.

Romeo and Juliet

William Shakespeare’s classic tragedy Romeo and Juliet tells the story of two youths desperately in love with each other despite the feud that exists between their two families. They are secretly married, but on the same day as their marriage, Romeo is banished for killing Juliet’s kinsman. While he is gone, Juliet fakes her death by taking a poisonous potion in order to avoid an arranged marriage. Romeo does not learn in time that she is not really dead, and kills himself as a result. Upon waking, Juliet discovers Romeo and joins him in death. Through Shakespeare’s timeless story, you will identify and analyze literary and dramatic elements, discover new vocabulary terms, and use comprehension strategies to make connections and draw conclusions.

Romeo and Juliet is the recommended text for Honors English 9. George Orwell’s novel Animal Farm may be read instead of Romeo and Juliet with prior teacher approval. Lessons and activities for Animal Farm will appear on the lower half of the lesson pages.

The Dark Side

In this unit, you will analyze fiction, nonfiction, and poetry selections belonging to the suspense and horror genres. As you read, you will apply active reading strategies, such as making predictions and asking questions to better understand the text. You will also learn to understand and analyze elements of suspense and horror narratives such as foreshadowing, stock characters and archetypes, and the role of unreliable narrators. You will also examine literary elements such as poetic devices and tone. Throughout the unit, you will also learn strategies for learning new vocabulary, such as understanding denotation and connotation and the use of archaic language. Grammar instruction will focus on reviewing the rules of subject-verb agreement and the use of adjectives and adverbs.

The Research Paper

In this unit, you will develop important reading and analytical writing skills as you research and write about a topic of your choice. The lessons in the unit are planned to guide you through the challenging but rewarding process of writing a research paper. You will complete this project in three main phases:

  • ¥ forming research questions and gathering information
  • ¥ organizing and analyzing your research findings
  • ¥ combining your own ideas with information from your research to create an effective, well-supported research paper

This unit differs from other units in the English 9 course in that it includes fewer reading assignments from your textbooks. Most of the reading you complete will be conducted as part of your research. Please note that it is especially important that you complete and turn in writing assignments consistently throughout this unit, since each new assignment builds on the work completed previously. Completing assignments on time and in order will help ensure that you have adequate time to develop and refine your ideas and to incorporate feedback from your teacher.

What Has Value?

In this unit, you will read fiction and poetry selections that analyze people’s differing values. As you read, you will apply active reading strategies, such as comparing texts and differentiating between fact and opinion. You will also learn to understand and analyze literary elements such as theme, tone, plot twist, and repetition. Throughout the unit, you will also review strategies for learning new vocabulary, such as understanding multiple-meaning words and using a dictionary. Finally, grammar instruction will focus on reviewing the skills taught earlier in the semester.

Semester Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam for the concepts you learned throughout the semester. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText E Guide to Language, Writing, & Literature
  • ¥ iText Pathways: Literature for Readers and Writers
  • ¥ iText Romeo and Juliet
  • ¥ iText The Red Badge of Courage

Honors English 10 A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the first of two courses that comprise English 10 Honors. In this course, the student will study the literature of the Americas, Europe, and Africa. In reading and responding to these selections, the student will gain an understanding of and appreciation for both the unique experiences of people from other cultures and the common themes that run through the human experience regardless of culture. Writing instruction focuses on analysis, exposition, and narrative writing with expanded opportunities for creative and fiction writing. An increased focus on higher-order thinking, literary analysis, and vocabulary studies differentiates this course from its standard-level equivalent.

Units:

The Literature of the Americas

America is not just the United States of America. It includes the many surrounding countries from Canada, the Caribbean, and Latin America. Just like in the United States, they have exciting writers who share the experiences of their country. Each writer has a unique voice, but the countries the writers represent share a history. It is a history in which they have been conquered and colonized by European explorers, and have opened their doors to immigrants from many cultures.

In this unit, you will not only read a selection of literary works from the Western Hemisphere, but also analyze literary concepts such as theme, tone, mood, and dramatic irony. You will explore fictional stories, drama, and poetry, as well as nonfiction essays and famous United States historical documents. During your study of grammar, you will review the eight parts of speech and apply your knowledge of those as you compose summaries, multi-paragraph essays and an informal letter. You will use a wide variety of study skills to master the concepts covered in this unit.

The Literature of the Americas II

In Unit 1, you read selections from several writers in the Americas. You learned about literary techniques such as tone, theme, imagery, and stage direction. In Unit 2, you’ll continue reading short stories and poems written by authors from the Americas.

Selections in this unit include writings by authors from St. Lucia, Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Brazil, Argentina, and Chile. The stories cover topics such as reconciliation, death, acceptance, anger, and relationships. There is a wealth of insight and emotion in the writings. As you read, you will learn new vocabulary, such as paradox, personification, and situational irony. You will also become familiar with additional techniques, such as magic realism and repetition, that enable literature to engage an audience from beginning to end. In this unit, you will write a compare and contrast essay on a topic related to your reading. You will select a topic, create a rough draft, revise, and edit your essay over the course of the unit. Additionally, you will continue your exploration of grammatical constructs that will enhance your oral and written communication skills.

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is the story of a free-thinking kid, Huck Finn, and a slave named Jim, both of whom choose to flee their oppressive lives. The two set out on a trip down the Mississippi River that is filled with adventures and experiences that are unique to the particular class of characters and setting of the mid-nineteenth century. The novel’s title is sometimes extended to include Tom Sawyer’s Comrade to indicate to readers that this is a companion novel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer , told as a first-person narrative from Huck’s point of view. Prior knowledge of Tom Sawyer is not required. In this unit, you will identify literary elements, analyze characters, use comprehension strategies to make connections and draw conclusions, and define unfamiliar vocabulary words. You will also create a multimedia presentation for Unit 3’s portfolio assessment.

Of Mice and Men may be read instead of the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn with prior teacher approval. Lessons and activities for Of Mice and Men will appear on the lower half of the page. Do not proceed with Of Mice and Men unless you have received approval from your teacher.Of Mice and Men is the story of two men, George Milton and Lennie Small, living a hardscrabble existence as migrant workers during the Great Depression. Smart and practical, George has spent years looking after Lennie. Lennie is hardworking and kind, but feeble-minded. Each man is the only “family” the other one has. As George and Lennie move from place to place and job to job, they hope to save enough money to buy a place of their own. Soon their dream seems within reach, but forces beyond their control threaten to ruin their hopes forever. In this unit, you will identify literary elements, analyze characters, use comprehension strategies to make connections and draw conclusions, and define unfamiliar vocabulary words. You will also create a multimedia presentation for Unit 3’s portfolio assessment.

Europe I

Europe has endured many conflicts which have influenced her literature—world wars, the Holocaust, and the collapse of the Soviet Union are examples. Writers are among the first targets of totalitarian regimes. Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, who was twice sent to Siberia, is one of many European authors who were exiled, imprisoned, or silenced. However, he refused to stop criticizing Russia’s Communist regime, believing that “Literature that is not the breath of contemporary society, that dares not transmit the pains and fears of that society, that does not warn in time against threatening moral and social dangers—such literature does not deserve the name of literature; it is only a façade. Such literature loses the confidence of its own people, and its published works are used as wastepaper instead of being read.”

In this unit, you will read selections that express some of hopes, disappointments, and fears of the writers and of the citizens of the European states.

As you read, you will learn new literary terms, such as rhyme scheme and allusion. You will be introduced to different character types, such as round characters, flat characters, and stock characters. You will also write an expository essay, which will add an additional type of writing to your growing portfolio. Additionally, you will review and apply your knowledge and correct use of phrases and clauses.

Europe II

In this unit, you will continue to read selections that express some of the hopes, disappointments, and fears of the writers and of the citizens of the European states. Selections you will read include a fable, short stories, one short story adapted from a play, and poetry from European writers. As you read, you will learn literary devices such as: allegory, author’s purpose, character development, dialogue, and hyperbole—all elements that authors use to create compelling stories. You will also practice using various clauses and different kinds of sentence structures to enhance your writing. Additionally, you will create a personal narrative about a subject of your choice you will draft examples of business communication in the form of a letter of complaint and a letter of application.

Africa

The African continent includes more than 50 countries and over 800 languages. The writers you will study in this unit come from various regions of Africa and have faced the challenge of telling their stories in languages that honor their heritage while at the same time reaching a wide audience. Most authors write in French and English, the languages spoken by European colonizers. But one author, Kenyan Ngugi wa Thiong’o, writes primarily in his native language, Gikuyu.You will read stories that reflect the authors’ analyses of life before and after colonization. They deal with subjects such as the griot storytelling tradition, clash of European and African cultures, and the pervasive effects of apartheid. Selections you will read include an epic poem, a first person narrative, and several short stories.As you read, you will learn literary devices used to create interesting stories and poems, such as personification, plot, tone, characterization, humor, theme, and setting. You will also practice using various verb forms and learn how to strengthen your writing through the use of vivid verbs. You will also learn elements of poetry including sound devices, rhythm, meter, types of figurative language, and various forms that poems can take. Finally, you will use the information you learned about poetry to create a poem.

Honors English 10A Semester Review and Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam on the concepts you learned throughout the semester. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Reading the World
  • ¥ iText The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  • ¥ iText The Importance of Being Earnest
  • ¥ iText Writing with Power 10 (Yellow) Student Ed

Honors English 10 B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the second of two courses that comprise English 10 Honors. In this course, the student will study the literature of the Middle East, South Asia, East Asia, and the Pacific Rim. In reading and responding to these selections, the student will gain an understanding of and appreciation for both the unique experiences of people from other cultures and the common themes that run through the human experience regardless of culture. Writing instruction focuses on description, exposition, research, persuasion, and literary analysis. An increased focus on higher-order thinking, literary analysis, and vocabulary studies differentiates this course from its standard-level equivalent.

Units:

The Importance of Being Earnest

In this unit, you will read and analyze the The Importance of Being Earnest, a play in which the characters hold the pursuit of pleasure above all other goals. As you read, you will relate the play to the Victorian culture in which the playwright, Oscar Wilde, lived, as well as to the comedies of the Restoration era. You will also analyze characterization, symbolism, and irony in the play.

The Importance of Being Earnest is the recommended play for English 10. George Bernard Shaw’s play Pygmalion may be read instead of The Importance of Being Earnest with prior teacher approval. Lessons and activities for Pygmalion will appear on the lower half of the page. Do not proceed with Pygmalion unless you have received approval from your teacher.

In Pygmalion, George Bernard Shaw scrutinizes various layers of English society in a romantic comedy. The play’s title alludes to a transformation that the Shaw’s characters undergo. Eliza Doolittle, a poor but scrappy flower girl, and Henry Higgins, a professor, wrestle with issues of identity, independence, class, character, and self-respect to create a play that remains relevant almost a century later.

Middle East and South Asia I

The literature of the Middle East and South Asia—including Algeria, Armenia, Egypt, India, Iraq, Israel, Palestine, Syria, and Turkey—provides rich insight into a culture marked by diverse traditions, religions, and languages, as well as a long history of conflicts. Today the region grapples with both ancient and modern ways of life as people balance preserving tradition and adopting new attitudes and customs influenced by Western culture.

In this unit, you will read literature that investigates the values, perspectives, and everyday experiences of people in the Middle East and South Asia. You will explore traditional and contemporary cultural attitudes about family roles, marriage, gender, and religious devotion, as well as the conflicts that arise as people navigate old and new ways of doing things. As you read and analyze the short stories and poems in this unit, you will consider the cultural contexts of the texts and identify and analyze symbolism, humor, and sensory details. After learning about descriptive writing, you will write a descriptive portrait. Throughout the unit, you will continue to develop and practice strategies for understanding vocabulary. Your grammar instruction will focus on pronoun usage.

Middle East and South Asia II

In this unit, you will continue your study of the literature of the Middle East and South Asia. As you continue to make comparisons between cultures, you will come to appreciate the similarities among all people. You’ll also receive a quick primer on online communications and Internet safety. Grammar instruction will focus on subject and verb agreement in a number of different cases. Finally, this unit includes a research proposal, which you will complete and submit as your portfolio assessment.

The Research Paper

In Unit 3, you prepared a research proposal that focused on some cultural aspect of one of the countries that was the focus of that unit. You limited your topic and researched and evaluated sources. In Unit 4, you will learn the process of creating a research paper based on that proposal. You will cover the steps from prewriting to editing as you work to create a final draft. In addition, you will learn to properly use adverbs and adjectives and begin a review of common usage issues.

Nonfiction: Persuasion

In this unit, you will focus on persuasive writing techniques. You will prepare and give a persuasive speech. The reading focus is on various nonfiction pieces, including historical speeches, technical directions, informational text, and a newspaper article. Public speaking and critical listening are twenty-first century skills. You will analyze persuasive techniques used in nonfiction as well as word choice, theme comparison, and mediums. Lastly, the grammar focuses are on capitalization usage, end marks, and commas.

East Asia and the Pacific Rim

In Unit 6, you will study literature from East Asia and the Pacific Rim, which includes such countries as Japan, China, Korea, Vietnam, Australia, and New Zealand. As you read, you will learn that the main theme of the literature from this region of the world is the region’s relationship with the West. During this unit, you will compose a literary analysis that explores an author’s purpose in a piece of literature of your choice. Finally, you’ll study the use of italics, quotation marks, hyphens, and semicolons for your grammar review.

Semester Exam

In this unit, you will prepare for and take the semester exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it will cover the following areas: literature of the Middle East and South Asia, literature of East Asia and the Pacific Rim, the writing processes for research and persuasive writing, and vocabulary. Applying the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with the multiple-choice, matching, short answer, and essay questions on the semester exam.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Reading the World
  • ¥ iText The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  • ¥ iText The Importance of Being Earnest
  • ¥ iText Writing with Power 10 (Yellow) Student Ed

Honors English 11 A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the first of two courses that comprise Honors English 11. In this course, the student will focus on the literary movements that comprise American literature, and trace the chronology of national literature from the early American and colonial period through the periods of Realism and Regionalism. In reading these diverse selections, the student will gain a thorough understanding of fiction, including short stories, poetry and drama; as well as nonfiction genres, including the oral tradition, seminal historical documents, and speeches. The student will also read Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee’s play The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail. Arthur Miller’s play The Crucible may be read instead of The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail. In reading these American plays and composing a dramatic scene, the student will understand drama in its historical and literary context.Writing instruction guides the student through the process of composing a descriptive essay and modeling the style of an American author. Throughout the course, the student expands his vocabulary in context. The mastery of both critical vocabulary and grammar skills helps the student become a more thoughtful and effective reader and writer. The Honors course includes more rigorous curriculum and provides greater opportunities for the student to explore concepts, engage in independent research, and demonstrate critical thinking skills.

Units:

New World, New Voices

In Unit 1, New World, New Voices, you will examine the concept of a national literature and read different genres that comprise our national literary heritage. You will read and explore the ideas and writing of the New World’s earliest inhabitants, visitors, and settlers. You will also analyze strategies for persuasive writing as well as the denotative and connotative meanings of vocabulary words in context. Additionally, this unit will give you practice composing timed writings.

American Romanticism (1820s–1850s)

In Unit 2, American Romanticism (1820s–1850s), you will read and analyze the short stories of Nathaniel Hawthorne and Edgar Allan Poe and the poetry of Walt Whitman. You will also study the subgenre of transcendentalism, a school of thought shaped by the prose of Ralph Waldo Emerson. Henry David Thoreau’s Walden will model the descriptive writing you will compose for your first portfolio assessment.

The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail

In Unit 3, you will read and analyze an American drama. The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail is a play in two acts written in 1970 by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee. The play is comprised of shifting scenes from the real and imagined life of American writer and philosopher Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862). Arrested on July 23, 1846 for failure to pay his taxes, Henry David Thoreau spent one night in jail. The play dramatizes that night, intercutting scenes in which Henry interacts with his cellmate with flashbacks to events from the years leading up to the date of his arrest.

For the second portfolio assessment, you will compose a dramatic scene.

The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail is the recommended play for English 11. Arthur Miller’s play The Crucible may be read instead of The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail with prior teacher approval. Lessons and activities for The Crucible will appear on the lower half of the lesson pages. Do not proceed with The Crucible unless you have received prior approval from your teacher.

Realism and Regionalism

In Unit 4, Realism and Regionalism (1860–1914), you will read, analyze, and interpret the short stories of American Realist and Regionalist authors, as well as the poetry of Emily Dickinson. In your examination of this literature, you will consider dialect, flashback, characterization, figurative language, and other devices used by Realist authors. During this unit, you will gain practice correctly using apostrophes and possessive pronouns. For your third portfolio assessment, you will select an American short story from Unit 2 or 4 and compose an alternate ending in the style of the original author.

Semester Review and Exam

In this unit, you will prepare for and take the semester exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it will cover the following units: Early American and Colonial Literature, American Romanticism, The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail, Realism and Regionalism. Applying the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with the multiple choice, matching, short answer, and essay questions on the semester exam.

Kit

  • ¥ LA Novel Kit G11 (Thoreau & Gatsby)

Novel

  • ¥ The Great Gatsby
  • ¥ The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText American Short Stories
  • ¥ iText Multicultural II
  • ¥ iText Writing with Power 11 (Green) Student Ed

Honors English 11 B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the second of two courses that comprise English 11. In this course, the student will focus on the literary movements in American literature, and trace the chronology of national literature from the modernist through the contemporary period. In reading and responding to these diverse literature selections, the student will gain a thorough understanding of a myriad of fiction and nonfiction genres, including short stories, essays, poetry, drama, memoirs, and autobiographies. The student will also read F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby. Ernest Hemingway’s novella The Old Man and the Sea may be read instead of The Great Gatsby. In reading these American literature selections, the student will understand longer works of literature in their historical and literary context.Writing instruction guides the students through the process of composing a literary analysis and a research paper. Throughout the course, the student expands his vocabulary in context. The mastery of both critical vocabulary and grammar skills helps the student become a more thoughtful and effective reader and writer. The Honors course includes more rigorous curriculum and provides greater opportunities for students to explore concepts, engage in independent research, and demonstrate critical thinking skills.

Units:

Voices of Modernism (1920s to 1940s)

In this unit, you will study the modernism movement, which occurred from the 1920s to the 1940s. You will read and analyze the short stories of authors such as John Steinbeck and F. Scott Fitzgerald and the poetry of Robert Frost, among others. You will also practice identifying and using different types of verb forms and clauses, as well as independent and subordinate clauses. For your portfolio assessment, you will apply your research and writing capabilities to compose a literary analysis showcasing your analytical and synthesizing skills.

Post-War Voices Emerge (1950s–1960s)

In Unit 2, you will enter the tumultuous times of post–World War II, during which time many people fought for change and demanded their rights. This time in history saw the emergence of literature that voiced people’s discontent with the mundane life of traditionalism and a desire for a break from conventional living. In this unit, you will read and analyze the short stories of Kurt Vonnegut and John Updike as well as Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech and poetry by writers of the Beat Generation. You will also identify elements of adjectival clauses. Your portfolio assessment for this unit will be a compare-and-contrast essay in which you analyze the works of two authors.

The Great Gatsby

In this unit, you will examine the narrative structure of The Great Gatsby, a novel that depicts life among the rich during the Roaring Twenties in New York. As you read, you will analyze point of view as well as how such literary devices as symbols and allusions enhance the meaning of the novel. For your portfolio project, you will write a self-improvement plan for the narrator of the novel. The Great Gatsby is the recommended novel for English 11. Ernest Hemingway’s novella The Old Man and the Sea may be read instead of The Great Gatsby with prior teacher approval. Lessons and activities for The Old Man and the Sea will appear on the lower half of the page. Do not proceed with The Old Man and the Sea unless you have received approval from your teacher.

Contemporary Postmodernism

In Unit 4, you will study a variety of voices from the contemporary postmodernism movement. The fight against racial and ethnic injustices took center stage during this literary movement, which took place from the 1960s to the 1980s. You will read poetry and prose from authors of several different backgrounds whose writings contributed to the mosaic of the American culture. In this unit, you will also practice identifying the principal parts of verbs and using the six verb tenses as well as different voices and moods of verbs. For your portfolio assignment, you will compose a personal narrative.

The Research Paper

In Unit 5, you will have the opportunity to become an authority on a subject by creating your own research report. Working through the writing process, you will select a topic, evaluate sources and conduct research, cite sources properly, draft a report, and revise and edit the report before publishing and submitting it as your portfolio project. You will also read and analyze several nonfiction essays by writers of diverse backgrounds. In addition, you will continue to learn about verb forms and tenses.

Semester Review and Exam

In this unit, you will prepare for and take the semester exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it will cover the following units: Voices of Modernism (1920s to 1940s), Post-War Voices Emerge (1950s–1960s), The Great Gatsby, and Contemporary Postmodernism.Applying the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with the multiple-choice, matching, true/false, and essay questions on the semester exam. Evaluating how you did on the first semester exam—identifying areas of weakness and strength—can also help you be successful on this semester’s exam.

Kit

  • ¥ LA Novel Kit G11 (Thoreau & Gatsby)

Novel

  • ¥ The Great Gatsby
  • ¥ The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText American Short Stories
  • ¥ iText Multicultural II
  • ¥ iText Writing with Power 11 (Green) Student Ed

Honors English 12 A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the first of two courses that comprise English 12A Honors. In this course, the student will take an in-depth look at a variety of types of English Literature that span from the Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Periods through the Restoration and the Enlightenment. In reading and responding to these selections, the student will gain an understanding of fiction and nonfiction genres including poetry, short stories, essays, and drama through examining their historical and cultural contexts, as well as specific literary elements. The student will also read Shakespeare’s Macbeth, exploring elements of drama and common themes of the Renaissance. Writing instruction will focus on expository and creative writing, but also provides opportunities for the student to write personal responses to literature. Grammar instruction will focus on verbs and pronouns, as well as clauses and sentence structure.

Units:

The Anglo-Saxon Period: 449–1066

In this unit, you will read the earliest works of English literature. More than a millennium old, many of these works were passed down orally for centuries before they were written down. Anglo-Saxon literature includes lyric poems that express emotion, as well as the earliest epic poem of the English language, Beowulf, which presents the adventures of a hero who is larger than life. Additionally, you will read poems from the Exeter Book, a collection of Anglo-Saxon poetry preserved in manuscript form and dating back to the middle of the tenth century. Finally, you will use the writing process to compose a description based on a scene from Beowulf.

The Middle Ages: 1066–1485

In this unit, you will read literary works composed during the medieval era. These include Chaucer’s narrative poem The Canterbury Tales, which presents various figures of medieval English society and the tales they tell while traveling on a long journey, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, a narrative poem based on the legends of King Arthur and his court. As you read, you will learn to analyze literary elements such as character, the narrator’s voice and perspective, and tone. You will also learn about and examine the historical, social, and cultural climate of the Middle Ages by identifying causes and effects. Finally, you will use the writing process to write an allegory, or an extended metaphor in the form of a short story.

Macbeth

In Unit 3, you will read Shakespeare’s tragic tale of the rise and fall of Macbeth, a fierce and loyal Scottish warrior is tempted by the prophecies of several witches and by his own ambitions to become king. Macbeth and his wife alternately collaborate and contend over the proper approach to achieve their ambitions. Macbeth, the tragic hero, discovers too late the dangers of unchecked ambition. As you read, you will analyze and interpret the dramatic structure of Macbeth, define words in context, and compose a persuasive essay.

Macbeth is the recommended play for English 12. Shakespeare’s comedy Twelfth Night may be read instead of Macbeth with prior teacher approval. Lessons and activities for Twelfth Night will appear on the lower half of the lesson pages. Do not proceed wtih Twelfth Night unless you have received approval from your teacher.

The Renaissance: 1485–1660

In this unit, you will read literary works composed during the English Renaissance. These include a variety of poetic genres including sonnets and lyric, pastoral, metaphysical, and epic poetry. As you read, you will learn to analyze such poetic elements as speaker, figurative language, and tone. You will also learn about and examine the historical, social, and cultural climate of the Renaissance by making generalizations about that period. Finally, you will use the writing process to write an expository essay on a subject of your choice.

The Restoration and the Enlightenment: 1660–1798

In this unit, you will read literary works composed during the Restoration and the Enlightenment periods. These include a variety of fiction, nonfiction, and poetic genres including diaries, mock epics, satires, and elegies. As you read, you will learn to analyze elements such as point of view, irony, and imagery. You will also learn about and examine the historical, social, and cultural climate of the Restoration and the Enlightenment by classifying information, or arranging ideas into fitting categories. Finally, you will use the writing process to write a poem using a specified form.

Semester Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam on the concepts you have learned throughout the semester. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText British Literature
  • ¥ iText Frankenstein
  • ¥ iText Writing with Power 12 (Teal) Student Edition

Honors English 12 B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the second of two courses that comprise English 12B Honors. In this course, students will continue to study English Literature of various genres, from the Romantic Period to the Modern Era. Through reading and responding to these selections, the student will gain further understanding of fiction and nonfiction including short stories, essays, and poetry. Students will have the opportunity to analyze the literature and its elements, as well as participate in discussions with their peers. Writing instruction will focus on the writing of a research paper and a poem based on characteristics of the Romantic Era. Grammar instruction will focus on pronouns and their antecedents.

Units:

The Romantic Period: 1798–1832

This unit explores element of dialect poetry and lyrical poetry during the Romantic period, and the Romantic sensibility expressed in the poems of the time.

Frankenstein

Frankenstein is the story of a young man, Victor Frankenstein, who becomes obsessed with studying anatomy and determined to understand how life is created. Passionate about science and dedicated to his dream, he creates a living being; however, his success dramatically affects his life and the lives of his family and friends. The details of Victor’s life are shared through letters from Robert Walton, an English explorer on an expedition to the North Pole, to his sister Margaret Seville in England. Robert learns Victor’s tragic tale when he rescues Victor, who is traveling by himself in the Arctic.

In this unit, you will identify literary elements, analyze characters, use comprehension strategies to make connections and draw conclusions, and define unfamiliar vocabulary words.

Frankenstein is the recommended novel for English 12. Jane Austen’s novel Pride and Prejudice may be read instead of Frankenstein with prior teacher approval. Lessons and activities for Pride and Prejudice will appear on the lower half of the lesson pages.

Published in 1813, Pride and Prejudice is the story of a middle-class English family, the Bennets. Mr. and Mrs. Bennet have five daughters in their teens and early twenties, and the family’s security depends on the girls’ prospects for marriage. Austen’s novel focuses primarily on the second-eldest of the sisters, the passionate and outspoken Elizabeth, and her relationship with Fitzwilliam Darcy, a wealthy bachelor. In relating the romantic adventures of Elizabeth and her sisters, Austen provides a detailed account of love and marriage at the end of the eighteenth century.In this unit, you will identify literary elements, analyze characters, use comprehension strategies to make connections and draw conclusions, and define unfamiliar vocabulary words.

Writing a Research Paper

In this unit, you will walk through the steps of researching and writing a research paper. You will then create a multimedia presentation based on your paper and learn to interpret and implement feedback from your peers and teacher.

The Victorian Age (1832–1901)

In Unit 4, The Victorian age (1832–1901), you will read and analyze a selection of poetry from authors such as Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Thomas Hardy, and Lord Tennyson. The literary trends of the Victorian age, which were greatly affected by the era’s Industrial Revolution, are shown through the various poets studied in this unit. As you closely compare and analyze their works, you will deepen your understanding and knowledge of tone, mood, and imagery in poetry.

The Modern Era (1901–Present)

In this unit, you will explore the historical, social, and cultural context of the twentieth century, and analyze how these aspects relate to the literary production of the time. You will read and analyze a variety of selections, including short stories, poems, and essays. For your portfolio assignment, you will develop a literary analysis based on an aspect of the modern era.

English 12 Semester Review and Exam

In this unit, you will prepare for and take the semester exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it will cover the following units from the semester: The Romantic Period, Writing a Research Paper, The Victorian Age, and The Modern Era. Applying the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with the multiple-choice, matching, short answer, and essay questions on the semester exam.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText British Literature
  • ¥ iText Frankenstein
  • ¥ iText Writing with Power 12 (Teal) Student Edition

Advanced Algebra with Financial Applications A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
In this course, the student will apply knowledge of algebra as he explores topics such as saving money, spending money, and dealing with debt. The student will apply formulas to determine account balances, monthly payments, and total costs. As the student applies knowledge in real-world scenarios, he will learn skills that provide a foundation for financial decisions.

Units:

Saving

In the Savings unit you are introduced to the concept of earning interest as opposed to saving your money in a piggy bank or under the mattress. You discover how interest allows an account balance to grow and how simple interest is different than compound interest. You will learn about the different variables that affect the total balance in a compound interest savings account while making connections between that type of exponential growth and that of population and other real world scenarios.

Spending

In the Spending unit you will learn about different algebraic models that can be used to represent data. You also see how a verbal model or written scenario can be translated into an algebraic equation or two that can then be solved for the missing variable(s). The examples throughout the unit connect back to the spending theme. When you reach the middle of the unit you are introduced to the concept of income tax and then to purchasing and financing options.

Debt

In the Debt unit you will learn about factors that can get you into debt and then how to get yourself out of it. The unit starts with basics behind credit cards and then moves into credit scores/reports and cash management. After learning the many ways people can easily get themselves into debt, you will learn how to create a budget and get out of debt.

Advanced Algebra with Financial Applications B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
In the second part of this course, the student will extend knowledge of the financial applications of algebra by exploring investments, mortgages, and retirement savings plans. While participating in real-world scenarios, the student will reflect on learning and evaluate progress as he continues to exercise financial decision-making skills.

Units:

Mortgage

The Mortgage unit is all about what goes into borrowing a large sum of money to purchase a home. This is one of the biggest purchases you will make. Knowing some of the pros and cons will help you to be more knowledgeable for future decision making.

Investment

In the Investment unit you will learn about the basics behind investing. You are given the opportunity to research some stock prices, make some predictions and calculate rates of return. By the end of this unit you should be able to describe risk tolerance and provide advice for someone looking to diversify their investment portfolio.

Retirement

In the Retirement unit you learn about what retirement is, how to plan for it and how to protect your assets for future dependents and loved ones.

Algebra 1 A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Math 7 and/or Pre-Algebra

Description:
This course is the first of two that comprise Algebra 1. In this course, the student will gain a foundational understanding of the real number system, expressions, equations, and inequalities. The student will be taught to solve simple and multi-step equations and inequalities and represent those solutions graphically. In addition, students will explore linear or nonlinear functions and represent those functions on the coordinate plane. Finally, the student will solve systems of equations and inequalities and represent those solutions graphically.

Throughout the course, problem solving, critical thinking, and real-world application of mathematical concepts will be required.

Units:

Foundations for Algebra

In this unit, you will be provided with a general introduction to Algebra 1 by reviewing many concepts from previous math courses including variables, expressions, and real-number operations. This unit provides you with a solid foundation for the remainder of Algebra 1. You will complete a unit portfolio project in which you will apply your knowledge of using variables to represent unknown and variable quantities, and writing expressions and equations.

Solving Equations

In this unit, you will learn how to solve problems using a variety of problem-solving strategies including tables, graphs, and equations. This unit also includes instruction on solving one, two, or multi-step equations, a skill that is essential to your learning of higher-level mathematics. You will complete a variety of assessments in this unit, including Quick Checks, quizzes, and a unit test.

Solving Inequalities

In this unit, you will learn how to solve inequalities that require one or more steps. You will also learn how to graph the solutions to inequalities on the number line. Set notation will be introduced as a tool for expressing the solutions to inequalities. Finally, you will explore absolute value equations and inequalities and the union and intersection of sets.

Introduction to Functions

In this unit, you will explore functions and their applications. You will be introduced to the characteristics of a function and learn to compare linear and nonlinear functions. You will also graph functions on the coordinate plane and write functions given their graph. Functions are an important part of algebra because they lay a foundation for understanding higher-level mathematics problems that depend on your understanding of the characteristics of functions.

Linear Functions

In this unit, you will learn how to use several types of linear equations, including slope-intercept, point-slope, and standard forms. You will use slope to compare parallel and perpendicular lines and explore relationships between these types of lines. You will also graph and translate absolute value functions on the coordinate plane.

Systems of Equations and Inequalities

In this unit, you will apply what you know about linear equations and inequalities to systems of linear equations or inequalities. You will solve systems of linear equations by graphing, substitution, or elimination. You will also be introduced to the topic of matrices and use them to solve systems of equations. You will graph linear inequalities and solve systems of two linear equalities. Finally, you will apply these topics to solve real-world scenarios.

Algebra 1 A Semester Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the semester exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Algebra 1: On Level

Textbook

  • ¥ Algebra 1: On Level †

Algebra 1 B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Algebra 1 A

Description:
This is course is the second part of a two-part sequence covering Algebra 1. The student will use his knowledge of real number operations, expressions, equations, inequalities, and functions to solve algebra concepts. This course will introduce the student to exponents and use those exponent rules to solve exponential functions. The student will learn how to identify and solve polynomial equations using a variety of methods including factoring. The student will also learn how to work with quadratic functions and equations and represent both of those on a coordinate plane. Students will work with and solve both radical and rational expressions and equations. Finally, the student will be introduced to statistics and learn to how use data to apply to probability problems in theory in and real-world scenarios.

Throughout the course, problem solving, critical thinking, and real-world application of mathematical concepts will be required.

Units:

Exponents and Exponential Functions

In this unit, you will learn about expressions involving exponents in several forms. You will learn about zero and negative exponents and use what you know about exponents to solve problems using standard and scientific notation. You will learn and apply the rules for multiplication and division of expressions involving exponents. Finally, you will evaluate exponential functions and use exponential functions to solve real world problems of exponential growth and decay.

Polynomials and Factoring

In this unit, you will learn how to classify, add, and subtract polynomials. You will also learn to multiply polynomials and monomials, and how to factor polynomials using GCF. You will then find the squares of a binomial, the sum and difference of squares, the product of a sum and difference, and you will factor higher-degree polynomials.

Quadratic Functions and Equations

In this unit, you will learn how to work with quadratic functions and quadratic equations. You will learn to graph functions in several forms and solve both quadratic equations and quadratic functions. You will also learn to choose between different models to display data, and finally, you will solve systems of linear and quadratic equations. These topics will be important foundational skills for your study of higher level mathematics.

Radical Expressions and Equations

In this unit you will work with radicals applied to many different types of problems. To begin, you will work with the Pythagorean Theorem and right triangles, using radicals in your solutions to those problems. Then you will learn to simplify and rationalize radicals, followed by solving problems using radicals in expressions and equations. You will learn to identify extraneous solutions to radical equations and graph their solutions. Finally, you will find and use trigonometric ratios and apply what you have learned to real-world scenarios.

Rational Expressions and Functions

In this unit you will work with rational expressions and equations. To begin, you will learn to simplify rational expressions. Then, you will learn to multiply and divide rational expressions and polynomials. You will also learn to simplify complex fractions. You will learn to define inverse variations and compare direct and inverse variations, as well as graphing rational functions.

Data Analysis and Probability

In this unit, you will explore data analysis and probability. To begin, you will organize data in a matrix form and learn to add, subtract, and perform scalar multiplication using matrices. You will work with various graphic representations of data including tables, histograms, box-and-whisker plots, and line graphs. Using data, you will explore measures of central tendency including mean, median, mode, and range. Finally, you will work with permutations, combinations, and independent and dependent events.

Semester B Exam and Review

This unit reviews concepts from Semester B of the Algebra 1 course. The unit begins with a review assignment that will help you recall topics from Units 1–6. You will also spend time utilizing the one-page review guides created at the end of each unit. These review guides contain key vocabulary, points to remember, and sample problems that you can rework. Practice opportunities from the textbook are included. The assessment is included at the conclusion of the unit in the form of the semester exam.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Algebra 1: On Level

Textbook

  • ¥ Algebra 1: On Level †

Algebra 2 A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Algebra 1 and Geometry

Description:
In this first semester of Algebra 2, the student will review and expand on his learning from Algebra 1. The beginning units will focus mostly on the equation and the inequality. The student will write, solve, and graph these in a variety of real-world scenarios. The last few units will focus on types of functions. The student will continue his study of quadratic and radical functions from Algebra 1, but will expand this to include exponential and logarithmic functions. As before, the student will write, solve, and graph these functions. Use of a graphing calculator is encouraged.

Units:

Expressions, Equations, and Inequalities

In this unit, you will explore algebraic expressions, equations, and inequalities, including how to model and solve real-world applications using these concepts. Some of these concepts, such as those involved in simplifying algebraic expressions and solving equations, are a review from previous math courses, and other concepts, such as those concerned with writing and solving equations and inequalities involving absolute value, are new for this course. The concepts presented in this unit will be used throughout this course, as they are the basics of Algebra 2.

Functions, Equations, and Graphs

In this unit, you will expand your knowledge of equations by exploring relations that can be represented by special equations, called functions. Direct variation, linear, and absolute value functions and their graphs will be used to solve a variety of problems. You will learn how functions can be used to model real-world data using a scatter plot and a line of best fit. In addition, you will learn the different forms in which a linear equation can be written as well as identify transformations of functions, such as vertical and horizontal translations, reflection, stretching, and compressing.

Linear Systems

In this unit, you will learn about linear systems and how to use them to solve problems that come up in real situations. Throughout the unit, you will explore the different methods for solving systems, such as using tables, graphs, or matrices, and the different ways in which a system can be solved algebraically. Linear programming will be used to solve real-world problems, such as ones involving maximizing profit.

Quadratic Functions and Equations

In this unit, you will explore quadratic equations and functions. You will see that when a quadratic equation is graphed, it forms a particular type of curve called a parabola. Some real-world situations can be modeled by parabolas—for example, the path a baseball makes when thrown up in the air. You will learn how to use multiple methods for solving quadratic equations including graphing, factoring, completing the square, and applying the quadratic formula. Lastly, you will explore the set of complex numbers and quadratic systems.

Polynomials and Polynomial Functions

Previously, you explored a specific type of polynomial, a quadratic polynomial. In this unit, you will explore a variety of polynomials, including monomials, binomials, and trinomials. You will learn how to identify and describe the properties of polynomials equations based on the powers of the variable terms they contain. In addition, you will learn methods to identify and represent factors, zeros, and x-intercepts of polynomial functions. You will identify the features of polynomial functions and their graphs and use them to model real-world situations such as maximizing the volume of a box and representing energy with power functions. You will also be introduced to methods and theorems that you will apply to solve polynomial equations.

Radical Functions and Rational Exponents

In this unit, you will continue to explore functions, specifically radical functions. Operations such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division are performed with radical expressions which you will learn in addition to how to simplify radical expressions. You will learn that radical functions can be written using a symbol or by using exponents that are fractions. You will also explore the graphs of radical functions and their inverses. Finally, you will continue modeling real-world applications using radical functions, such as calculating voltage or circular velocity.

Exponential and Logarithmic Functions

In this unit, you will explore two more types of functions, exponential and logarithmic. You will use exponential functions to model real-world situations and solve real-world problems, including problems involving interest and population growth or decay. You will also learn how using logarithms can help you solve exponential equations. Finally, you will learn to graph both exponential and logarithmic functions.

Semester A Review and Exam

In this unit, you will review concepts from Semester A in order to prepare for the semester exam, which you will take at the end of this unit.

Algebra 2 B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Algebra 2 A

Description:
In this second semester of Algebra 2, the student will strengthen his algebraic problem-solving abilities and deepen his understanding of mathematics. The student will, among other things, explore cross-sections of three-dimensional figures, calculate probabilities, and perform operations on matrices. The course will conclude with an introduction to trigonometry and its associated functions.

Units:

Rational Functions

In this unit, you will be exploring rational functions beginning with inverse and direct variations. Next, you will have the opportunity to stretch, compress, reflect, and translate functions while exploring reciprocal functions. Finally, you will be adding and subtracting rational expressions, and then solving rational equations. These concepts will be used to solve real situations that involve two different rates, such as calculating speed while taking into account the wind.

Sequences and Series

In this unit, you will explore different types of patterns in arithmetic and geometric sequences. You will identify mathematical patterns and create a rule to describe a pattern. Finally, you will find the sum of an arithmetic or geometric series, or use the sum of a series to determine the number of terms.

Quadratic Relations and Conic Sections

Different types of curves are formed when a plane and a cone intersect, depending on the angle of intersection. In this unit, you will explore these different types of conic sections, referred to as parabolas, circles, ellipses, and hyperbolas. You will learn about their graphs and equations, and how to use these conic sections to model and solve problems.

Probability and Statistics

Chances of winning a lottery, batting averages, and surveys are a few of the many places where probability and statistics appear in real-world situations. In this unit, you will explore ideas concerning the number of ways events can occur using permutations and combination. You’ll learn which sampling methods reduce bias and provide good statistical information.

Matrices

In this unit, you will explore how to organize data, model and solve problems, and transform figures using matrices. This will involve adding, subtracting, and multiplying matrices, as well as finding the inverse of a matrix and solving matrix equations. You will see how matrices can be used to solve problems involving vectors and systems of equations.

Periodic Functions and Trigonometry

In this unit, you will explore periodic functions and trigonometry. The unit will begin with exploring periodic data, which represent periodic behavior such as a heartbeat or a sound wave. You will then use the unit circle, radian angle measures, and trigonometric functions, such as sine, cosine, and tangent. Finally, you will learn how to model real-world situations and solve problems using trigonometric functions.

Trigonometric Identities and Equations

In this unit, you will explore trigonometric identities and equations. Using inverse trigonometric functions and basic identities, such as reciprocal, tangent, and cotangent identities, you will be able to create and solve trigonometric equations in order to solve problems. Trigonometric ratios for a circle will help you to find side lengths and angle measures in right triangles. For triangles that do not have a right angle, you will learn how to use the Law of Sines and the Law of Cosines to find missing measures.

Semester B Review and Exam

In this unit, you will review concepts from semester B in order to prepare for the semester exam, which you will take at the end of this unit.

AP Calculus AB A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2, Precalculus or Trigonometry/Analytical Geometry

Description:
AP Calculus AB is a college-level course covering such concepts as derivatives, integrals, limits, approximation, applications, and modeling. In the first semester, the student will begin by reviewing function notation, before exploring absolute value, piecewise, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, polynomial, and rational functions. After studying limits and continuity, the student will move on to concepts of derivatives, including the chain rule, differentiation, implicit differentiation, and logarithmic differentiation. Toward the end of the course, the student will apply what he has learned to solve integration problems.

Units:

Introduction: Preparation for Calculus

Limits and Continuity

After you complete this unit you should be able to:

  • ¥ find the limit of a function as x approaches a given value (analytically, numerically, and graphically)
  • ¥ determine if a function is continuous at a given point
  • ¥ find a one sided limit
  • ¥ determine if a function is approaching infinity as x approaches a given value

Differentiation

After you complete this unit you should be able to:

  • ¥ find the derivative of basic functions using the limit definition
  • ¥ find derivatives of polynomial, rational, radical, and trigonometric functions using the power rule, product rule, quotient rule, and chain rule
  • ¥ find derivatives using implicit differentiation
  • ¥ solve related rates problems

Applications of Differentiation

After you complete this unit you should be able to:

  • ¥ use the derivative to identify horizontal tangents
  • ¥ use the first and second derivative tests to locate relative maximum and minimum values of a function
  • ¥ use the second derivative to find the concavity of a function
  • ¥ use derivatives to determine when the graph of a function is increasing and/or decreasing and has relative extreme values, inflection points, and asymptotes
  • ¥ solve optimization problems
  • ¥ calculate the differential of a function

Integration

After you complete this unit you should be able to:

  • ¥ find the antiderivative of polynomial and trigonometric functions
  • ¥ use a Riemann sum to calculate the area under a curve
  • ¥ explain how the fundamental theorem of calculus allows us to find definite integrals using the antiderivative of a function
  • ¥ use substitution to solve integrals where appropriate
  • ¥ use the trapezoid rule to find the value of a definite integral numerically

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Calculus: Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic

Textbook

  • ¥ AP Calculus:Graphical,Numerical,Algebraic 4th Ed

Workbook

  • ¥ 2003 AP Calculus AB Exam Booklet

AP Calculus AB B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of AP Calculus AB A

Description:
AP Calculus AB is a college-level course covering such concepts as derivatives, integrals, limits, approximation, applications, and modeling. The student will begin by reviewing function notatio, before exploring absolute value, piecewise, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, polynomial, and rational functions. After studying limits and continuity, the student will move on to concepts of derivatives, including the chain rule, differentiation, implicit differentiation, and logarithmic differentiation. Toward the end of the course, the student will apply what he has learned to solve integration problems.

Units:

Transcendental Functions

After you complete this unit, you should be able to do the following:

  • ¥ Find the derivatives and integrals of exponential and logarithmic functions including bases other than e.
  • ¥ Find the derivatives of inverse functions and inverse trigonometric functions.

Differential Equations

After you complete this unit, you should be able to do the following:

  • ¥ Solve Differential Equations using Growth and Decay Models and the Separation of Variables method.
  • ¥ Use Slope Fields to picture approximate solutions to the differential equation.

Applications of Integration

After you complete this unit, you should be able to do the following:

  • ¥ Use integrals to find the area under a curve and the area between two curves.
  • ¥ Use the disc or washer method to calculate the volume of solids or rotation.
  • ¥ Find the volume of solids with known cross sections.

Integration Techniques

After you complete this unit, you should be able to do the following:

  • ¥ Determine which of the previously used formulas and integration techniques are appropriate for solving a given problem.
  • ¥ Use computer technology to find integrals that do not fit formulas.
  • ¥ Use L’Hopital’s rule to calculate derivatives.

Course Review

Unit 5 uses the AP Review course to help you to prepare for the exam and directs you to answer specific questions about the activities in the review lessons.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Calculus: Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic

Textbook

  • ¥ AP Calculus:Graphical,Numerical,Algebraic 4th Ed

Workbook

  • ¥ 2003 AP Calculus AB Exam Booklet

AP Calculus BC A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2, Precalculus or Trigonometry/Analytical Geometry

Description:
AP Calculus BC is an extension of Calculus AB. The course emphasizes broad concepts and applicable methods. The student will describe and analyze functions, limits, and graphs, calculate and apply derivatives, interpret and apply integrals, and study polynomial approximations and series. The course provides opportunities for the student to apply concepts to real-world situations.

Units:

Limits and Continuity

Unit 1 is AP Calculus AB material. In Unit 1, you are introduced to limits. The concept is taught first from an intuitive view using graphs and tables and is then followed with an analytical approach. One-sided limits are addressed and lead to the definition of continuity.

Differentiation

Unit 2 is AP Calculus AB material. Unit 2 presents the definition of a derivative, follows up with techniques of differentiation, and concludes with Related Rates problems.

Applications of Differentiation

Unit 3 contains the applications of differential calculus. You’ll be applying all those derivative rules that you learned in unit 2, so be sure that you are comfortable with them!

Integration

Unit 4 is AP Calculus AB material. This is one of the most important units in the course with the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Make sure students understand the concept of a Riemann sum.

Transcendental Functions

This unit is mostly AP Calculus AB material. Unit 5 teaches the calculus of transcendental functions. You will generally not have a lot of trouble with this unit but need to memorize the formulas. The course does not cover hyperbolic functions (section 5.8 in the text). Lesson 6 contains new material to AB students: logarithmic differentiation.

Differential Equations

This unit covers differential equations. Parts of this unit are AB topics. Not all lessons are covered in the textbook.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Calculus: Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic

Textbook

  • ¥ AP Calculus:Graphical,Numerical,Algebraic 4th Ed

Workbook

  • ¥ 2003 AP Calculus BC Exam Booklet

AP Calculus BC B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of AP Calculus BC A

Description:
AP Calculus BC is an extension of Calculus AB. The course emphasizes broad concepts and applicable methods. The student will describe and analyze functions, limits, and graphs; calculate and apply derivatives; interpret and apply integrals; and study polynomial approximations and series. The course provides opportunities for the student to apply concepts to real-world situations.

Units:

Unit 1 – Applications of Integrations

In this unit, you will learn about applications of integration. Not all lessons are covered in the textbook.

Unit 2 – Integrations Techniques

This unit covers techniques of integration, L’Hopital’s Rule and improper integrals. Not all lessons are covered in the textbook.

Unit 3 – Infinite Series Part I

This unit is the first half of chapter 9 in the textbook. This unit covers all the tests for convergence. You should memorize these tests.

Unit 4 – Infinite Series Part II

Unit 4 covers the second half of chapter 9 in the textbook. This material covers Power, Taylor and Maclaurin series, Taylor and Maclaurin polynomials and error computation. You will find this material challenging.

Unit 5 – Parametric and Polar

This unit covers most of chapter 10 in the textbook (we do not do two of the textbook sections on conics.) Some of this material should be a review from Precalculus. We also include the AP material on Vectors in this unit, which is not covered in the textbook.

Unit 6 – Getting Ready for the Exam

The purpose of this Unit is to discuss the format and scoring of the AP Calculus BC Exam and to discuss test-taking techniques.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Calculus: Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic

Textbook

  • ¥ AP Calculus:Graphical,Numerical,Algebraic 4th Ed

Workbook

  • ¥ 2003 AP Calculus BC Exam Booklet

Calculus A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Precalculus or Algebra 2

Description:
Calculus A introduces limits, differentiation, and applications of differentiation. The student will find and evaluate finite and infinite limits graphically, numerically, and analytically. The student will find derivatives using a variety of methods including the chain rule and implicit differentiation. Then the student will use the first derivative test and the second derivative test to analyze and sketch functions. Finally, the student will find derivatives using a variety of methods including substitution.

The use of a graphing calculator is considered an integral part of the course and the student will use a graphing calculator throughout this course.

Units:

Introduction

Welcome to Calculus A. This brief unit introduces the course objectives and presents tips and grading guidelines for the Research Paper, which you will work on throughout the semester.

Limits and Their Properties

In this unit you will learn how to calculate limits and explore their central role in calculus. You will study the notation, domain, and range of functions as well as the families, transformations, and compositions of functions. Throughout the unit you will apply what you learn to real-world situations. You will also continue to work on your research paper.

Differentiation

In Unit 3, you will learn how to calculate derivatives, one of the two major tools of calculus. You will study the rules of differentiation, explore the connection between differentiability and continuity, use derivatives to find rates of change, distinguish between functions written in implicit and explicit form, and apply related rates to solve real-world problems. Also, you will continue to work on your research paper.

Applications of Differentiation

In this unit, you will learn the fundamental applications of differentiation using the first and second derivatives. You will find extrema over closed intervals, sketch and analyze the graph of a function, solve applied minimum and maximum problems, and use a tangent line approximation. In addition, you will apply several tests and theorems including Rolle’s Theorem, the Mean Value Theorem, and the First and Second Derivative tests. You will complete your research paper by the end of this unit.

Final Review and Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. The final exam may include any material that has been presented throughout the semester. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes and answers to questions before you begin to review.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Houghton Mifflin Calculus

Textbook

  • ¥ Houghton Mifflin Calculus †

Calculus B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Calculus A

Description:
Calculus B introduces integration of functions, differential equations, and applications of integration. The student will calculate antiderivatives using a variety of methods including substitution. The student will evaluate integrals using a variety of methods including numerical integration. Then the student will understand and apply Riemann sums, definite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. In particular, the student will differentiate and integrate logarithmic, exponential, and inverse trigonometric functions. The student will solve simple differential equations, which can be solved by separation of variables, and use the calculations to solve applied problems. The student will use integration to determine the area between two curves, volume, and surface area. Finally, the student will apply integration to determine work, center of mass, and fluid force.

The use of a graphing calculator is considered an integral part of the course and the student will use a graphing calculator throughout this course.

Units:

Integration

In this unit, you will learn the fundamentals of integration, a key concept of calculus. You will use integration to find the area of regions, apply the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, compare differentiation and integration, and study the Trapezoidal Rule and Simpson’s Rule. In addition, you will research Georg Riemann, a German mathematician who made significant contributions to geometry and calculus.

Logarithmic, Exponential, and other Transcendental

In this unit, you will learn to apply integration to different functions, including trigonometric and hyperbolic functions. You will also explore how integration applies to the natural logarithmic function. You will learn how to use different functions to solve real-world problems, including the design of suspension bridges.

Differential Equations

In this unit, you will use differentiation and integration to solve differential equations. You will use differential equations to solve real-world problems involving cooling and falling objects, temperature variance, and bacterial growth. In addition, you will learn how to solve logistic differential equations, first-order linear differential equations, and Bernoulli differential equations.

Applications of Integration

In this unit, you will continue to apply the technique of integration. Specifically, you will learn how to calculate the area of a section between two curves; determine volumes, arc lengths, and areas of a surfaces; and use the disc, washer, and shell methods to solve problems. In addition, you will learn how calculus applies to physics as you calculate the work done by a constant force.

Final Review and Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. The final exam may include any material that has been presented throughout the course. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes and answers to questions before you begin to review.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Houghton Mifflin Calculus

Textbook

  • ¥ Houghton Mifflin Calculus †

Consumer Math A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the first of two courses that comprise Consumer Math. In this course, the student will learn that money is lost or gained depending upon the information a consumer has to help him make informed decisions. Retailers, banks, and credit card companies may not provide consumers with all the information they need to make good decisions. By the end of this course, the student will understand the history of money, define fixed costs and discretionary spending, understand the importance of savings, and recognize the dangers of debt. This course will ask the student to look hard at his financial choices including spending patterns, purchasing motivations, and how to make some difficult decisions.

Units:

Money and Spending

In this unit, you will learn the necessary skills to establish a solid consumer mathematics foundation. Concepts emphasized in this unit will reappear throughout the course, so take the time to complete each lesson carefully.

As you work through the unit, you will explore the history of currency and how it has changed over time. You will calculate discount, sales tax, and the cost of single items using many real-world situations. You will learn how to estimate expenses before going to the register at a store or receiving a check at a restaurant. You will analyze the information on an invoice and examine the different methods of payment. Finally, you will explore the fundamentals of creating a budget by estimating your expenses and saving money.

Controlling Expenses

This unit focuses on calculating total expenses using addition and subtraction of decimals, multiplication and division of decimals, and percentages of numbers. You will learn to read tables with specific situational data including time and money to determine the best plan for using electricity and telephones. You will also learn how to make estimations when shopping and then use those estimations to calculate the total bill at a restaurant including sales tax and tip. Then, you will complete activities to keep track of your expenses and checking balance. Lastly, you will perform computations involving wage earnings in order to determine how many work hours a purchase requires.

Finances: Income and Debt

Interest, earnings, and savings are the key concepts in this unit. You will solve problems involving the formula for simple interest to determine various earnings on savings. You will learn the difference between involuntary and voluntary pay deductions and use a percentage of a number to determine net income. You will also have an opportunity to explore the effects of compounding interest on a traditional savings over a long period of time as compared to a simple interest computation over the same period of time. By the end of the unit, you will have a greater understanding of how credit cards have an impact on your financial health by completing problems using interest calculations and late fees. Through these calculations, you will compare the final cost of these credit card purchases, which may change your mind about purchasing items that are wants (luxuries) rather than needs (necessities).

Dealing with Debt

Debt is an inevitable part of your financial life and this unit focuses on different types of debt and the mathematical computations involved. You differentiate between fixed expenses and discretionary expenses, then calculate your total fixed expenses using addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of decimals, and finally determine how much of your gross pay is allowed for housing and fixed expenses using percentage of a number. You complete decimal computations again when paying off credit card debt over a long period of time. Finally, you explore the methods used to calculate your credit score and your credit scores impact on interest rates involving debt and savings. You will interpret a data table to complete your calculations, and then compare outcomes based on several situations.

Review

This unit reviews the information taught in Units 1 – 4 in preparation for the course final. You review key concepts from Unit 1 such as bartering, exchange rates, and purchasing goods from grocery and departments stores. You use decimal computations to calculate final costs and then comparing of decimals to make recommendations on purchases. Unit 2’s review continues the theme of decimal computations but expands to include controlling your expenses and keeping track of income through utilization of a checking account. Unit 3 focused on tabulating interest using the I=Prt simple interest formula and the impact long periods of time can have on savings growth. You also review calculating gross pay, deductions, and net income. Finally for Unit 4’s review, you complete comparisons involving credit card debt versus savings lost, the impact of various payments of paying off debt, the work hours cost of purchases, and the effects of different credit scores on interest rates.

Final Exam

In this unit, you will take the final exam. The final exam may include any material that has been presented throughout the semester. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes before you begin to review.

Consumer Math B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the second of two courses that comprise Consumer Math. In this course, students will continue to learn how to make good financial decisions. Retailers, banks, and credit card companies may not provide consumers with all the information they need to make good decisions. By the end of this course, the student will differentiate between secured and unsecured debt, learn how to create a budget, examine a credit report, and discover the best way to increase income and decrease expenses. This course will provide the student with the skills to make good financial decisions.

Units:

Debt vs. Savings

In this unit, you learn more about types of debt from credit cards (unsecured debt) to home mortgages (secured debt). You learn why good credit is an advantage when acquiring debt and how to avoid bad credit. Using interest rate tables that take credit scores and secured versus unsecured loans into consideration, you will compute interest accrued on loans. You will analyze the impacts of maintaining a good credit history on your long term ability to save. Given various credit situations, you will determine which financial approach is the best by completing computations involving simple interest, money, and long term payoff amounts.

Budgeting

Budgets are used to accomplish a variety of financial goals whether you are saving for an emergency fund or retirement. This unit focuses on the key parts of a budget and the proper way to develop one. You revisit computations involving housing expenses and fixed costs and use proportions to determine the realized income needed to stay within the percentage limits allowed. You will calculate how much of an emergency fund you need based on housing expenses and fixed costs and then develop a plan of saving involving either a percentage of your discretionary monies or income from a 2nd job. Lastly, you will complete computations for how much money an emergency fund can save you in the case when you need to use it versus if you had used a credit card, and then how long it will take you to rebuild your emergency fund.

Finances

You have already considered the impact of your credit score on your ability to save and interest rates on debt. This unit will focus you on increasing your savings through other ways. You will complete calculations involving paying off high interest debt more quickly by paying more than the minimum and compare the savings both in money and time. You will learn about how carpooling can save you and coworkers money on transportation costs, and compare the benefits of moving from one part-time job to another even though the base pay rate may be less. Coupons were one form of saving when shopping but another is bulk or volume purchasing. You learn when it is a good thing to visit a wholesale club store and the savings that can be had when compared to local store prices by completing multiplication and division problems involving money. Lastly, you will learn the statistical value of attaining certain educational degrees by analyzing data from the United States Bureau of Labor and turning your educational level into money terms.

Savings and Financial Planning

This unit takes a more detailed look at savings plans. You will learn the key element to a good savings plan and then why it is important to diversify. You will learn about the stock market and treasury bonds as other options to reach your savings goals but also identify the advantages and disadvantages of these options. You will make many calculations using percentages and money, whether to calculate your realized income or the down payment for a house. You will compare savings outcomes and the effect of shifting monies from one savings instrument to another. This unit will also explain how a long-term savings goal can be translated into monthly goals. Lastly, you will examine the importance of contracts to your life and their specific implications when you loan money to friends or when your parents rent you an apartment to attend college away from home.

Review

This unit reviews the information taught in Units 1–4 in preparation for the course final. You will review key concepts from Unit 1, such as the difference between secured and unsecured debt, the benefits of maintaining good credit, and the effects these items have on the interest rates you pay. The review for Unit 2 focuses on the development of a budget and the impact a second job (or in your case, a part-time job) can have on your ability to save. The review for Unit 3 revisits how to increase your income by obtaining a job, a part-time job, or gaining more education. You will also review additional ways you can reduce your spending through sharing of expenses by doing such things as carpooling or buying items in bulk. Lastly, you will reexamine Unit 4, which looks in more detail at developing a savings plan, being realistic about your goals, and the importance of contracts to your financial well-being. Key vocabulary from these units includes appreciation, assets, depreciation, educational attainment, part-time job, median income, down payment, and closing costs. Mathematical skills that are important in this review include the ability to work with money using addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division—computing your net hourly income to computing how many hours you must work to purchase an item or meet a goal.

Final Exam

In this unit, you will take the final exam. The final exam may include any material that has been presented throughout the semester. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes before you begin to review.

Explorations in Mathematics A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This course provides students with a foundation in fundamental mathematic concepts, allowing them to apply these concepts to real-world situations. Prime factorization and operations with rational numbers and integers are covered, establishing a solid base for the study of more complex math.

Units:

Working with Rational Numbers

In this unit, you will learn the necessary skills to establish a solid mathematics foundation. Concepts emphasized in this unit will reappear throughout the course, so take the time to complete each lesson carefully.

As you work through the unit, you will expand your knowledge of rational numbers. You will explore divisibility patterns and prime factorization. You will use this knowledge to identify and determine the greatest common factor and the least common multiple of rational numbers. Then, you will learn how to add and subtract rational numbers with like and unlike denominators and how to reduce the answer to its simplest form. Finally, you will solve rational number problems by multiplying and dividing.

Variables, Equations, and Properties

In this unit, you will recognize and solve mathematical expressions and equations involving variables. You will identify, understand, and simplify expressions using the following properties: Associative Property of Addition and Multiplication, Commutative Property of Addition and Multiplication, Additive and Multiplicative Identity Property, Additive and Multiplicative Inverse Properties, and the Distributive Property. Finally, you will learn how to use the order of operations to evaluate expressions.

Explorations of Mathematics A Final

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Explorations in Mathematics B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
In the B course, students build on fundamental math concepts and examine integers and solving equations. Probability and statistics round out the course; students explore mean, mode, and median, as well as more advanced concepts, such as permutations and combinations.

Units:

Integers and Solving Equations

In this unit, you will explore the addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division properties of equality and use these properties to solve simple and one-step equations. You will be introduced to the concept of absolute values of integers in order to compare two or more integers. Then, you will learn how to add, subtract, multiply, and divide integers. You will solve simple equations using the reflexive, symmetric, transitive, and substitution properties of equality. Finally, you will expand your knowledge of one-step equations skills to solve real-world application problems and multi-step equations.

Probability and Statistics

In this unit, you will be introduced to and solve equations using the concepts of direct and inverse variation. You will learn the measures of central tendency including mean, median, mode, and range, and determine these measures in a data set. You will expand on the measures of central tendency by calculating the quartiles of an ordered data set. Then, you will explore some common concepts of probability including the counting principle, permutations, combinations, and probability of simple events. At the end of the unit, you will calculate real-world probability problems.

Explorations in Mathematics B Final

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Geometry A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Algebra 1

Description:
This is the first of two courses that comprise Geometry. Throughout the course, the student will use virtual manipulatives and tools to explore the principles of logic, proofs, and constructions. The student will use the midpoint and distance formulas to solve a variety of problems involving the coordinate plane. The student will also study parallel and perpendicular lines, including special angle pairs. The student will use triangle concepts to find angle measures, prove triangles congruent, and discover relationships within one and two triangles. This course will conclude with the study of polygons and quadrilaterals, during which the student will learn the properties and formulas to find angle measures and classify parallelograms. Throughout the course, the student will learn concepts through a variety of instructional strategies, solve real-world applications, and complete an assortment of activities.

Units:

Tools of Geometry

This unit introduces various topics in geometry. The beginning of the unit involves representing three-dimensional solid figures using nets, isometric drawings, and orthographic drawings. Special drawing techniques are introduced, such as slanted lines to represent three-dimensional perspective and dashed lines to represent hidden lines. An introduction to basic geometry terms such as points, lines, and planes is included. These are introduced as the building blocks of geometry on which all other geometry terms are defined. Postulates and axioms are introduced as well as naming techniques.Measuring segments and angles are introduced along with the Ruler Postulate, Segment Addition Postulate, Protractor Postulate, and Angle Addition Postulate. Types of angles as well as special angle pairs and their relationships are included. The degree unit is introduced and the use of a protractor to find angle measure is included. A ruler is also used to find segment length. Problems involving algebra, such as solving linear equations, are used to find segment lengths and angle measures. The concept of creating constructions without the use of measurement by using only a straightedge and protractor is introduced in this unit. Four basic constructions are included, such as constructing congruent segments, congruent angles, perpendicular bisectors, and angle bisectors. These constructions will be used to create other constructions, such as an equilateral triangle. They will also be used to solve problems, such as creating a 45o angle.

The unit concludes with finding the midpoint of segments on a number line and on a coordinate plane using the midpoint formulas. The distance formula is used to find the distance between two points in a coordinate plane. Algebra skills are reviewed as necessary for solving problems using midpoint and distance formulas. Other formulas included at the end of the unit are formulas used to find perimeter, circumference, and area of geometric figures such as squares, rectangles, triangles, and circles. The area of a region is also explored.

Many new vocabulary terms associated with the topics are included. A variety of real-world applications are embedded throughout the unit. A variety of activities are also used to enhance instruction, such as BrainPOP® movies, Gizmos, Discovery Educationstreaming movies, SkillsTutor™, and PowerGeometry. Assessments in Unit 1 include quick checks, quizzes, a unit portfolio involving origami, a discussion on how math is used in daily life, and a unit test.

Standard Geometry

This unit focuses on reasoning and writing formal proofs. You will observe patterns in numeric and geometric sequences and use inductive reasoning to make conjectures. Then you will explore conditional and biconditional statements. The conclusion of the unit introduces two types of formal proofs, two-column proofs and paragraph proofs. Finally, you will complete a portfolio project about the ancient Greeks’ use of deductive reasoning and mathematics, and participate in a discussion on inductive and deductive reasoning.

Parallel and Perpendicular Lines

In this unit you will explore concepts associated with parallel and perpendicular lines. The unit begins with identifying parallel, perpendicular, and skew lines. Parallel and perpendicular planes will also be introduced, as well as the special types of angles formed by two lines and a transversal. You will participate in a discovery activity that explores special properties of angles formed by two parallel lines and a transversal. The theorems and postulate for the special angle pairs will be proven and used to find angle measures. Then the converse of these theorems and postulate are introduced and used to prove lines parallel. Different forms of proofs such as two-column, paragraph, and flow-proofs involving parallel and perpendicular lines will be ncluded. Theorems involving triangles are also introduced, such as the triangle angle-sum theorem and triangle exterior angle theorem. New constructions involving parallel and perpendicular lines are then introduced, as well as constructions involving special quadrilaterals and a regular polygon inscribed in a circle. To finish out this unit, concepts related to linear equations in a coordinate plane will be explored, such as slope and different forms in which linear equations are written. Slope relationships of parallel and perpendicular lines are also explored.

Activities throughout the unit include dynamic online activities, BrainPOP® movies, Gizmos, SkillsTutorTM, and Teachlet® tutorials. Practice opportunities such as online practice, textbook problems, journal entries, and worksheets are included. Assessments are included throughout the unit in the form of Quick Checks, quizzes, a unit test, and a portfolio involving constructions.

Congruent Triangles

This unit covers concepts associated with congruent triangles, such as identifying corresponding parts of congruent triangles, identifying isosceles and equilateral triangles, proving triangles congruent, and proving parts of triangles congruent. Lessons build on your understanding and skills related to angles and triangles. Visualization skills will be used for overlapping triangles. Theorems and postulates such as SSS, SAS, ASA, AAS, and HL will be introduced throughout the unit. Corresponding parts of congruent triangles are congruent (CPCTC) are used to prove parts of triangles congruent. You will use and apply properties of isosceles and equilateral triangles. You will also prove two triangles congruent using other congruent triangles.A variety of methods will be used throughout the unit for instruction, practice, and review of concepts. You will complete worksheets and online practice for various concepts. Math writing journal activities require you to relate concepts to real-world applications and apply your knowledge in order to respond to thought-provoking questions. Online and interactive activities, such as Teachlet® tutorials, SkillsTutor™ exercises, and Gizmos will be used to further your understanding of concepts.

Various assessments will be used throughout the unit to measure your progress such as Quick Checks, quizzes, and a unit test. You will also complete a unit portfolio that involves viewing a Discovery Education™ streaming video on how math played a role in the design, technology, and construction of ancient Greek architecture and modern skyscrapers using triangles. You will then complete related tasks involving architecture and triangles to complete the portfolio.

Triangles

In this unit, you will discover and explore concepts involving relationships within triangles. You will expand on the skills learned in previous units, such as using the midpoint formula to find the midsegments of triangles and the distance formula to examine relationships in triangles. You will learn new theorems, such as the Triangle Midsegment Theorem, Perpendicular Bisector Theorem, Angle Bisector Theorem, and Hinge Theorem, as well as theorems related to concurrency in triangles and triangle inequality.

You will also explore relationships within a triangle using the Comparison Property of Inequality, the Corollary to the Triangle Exterior Angle Theorem, as well as those theorems related to triangle inequality. Finally, you will identify and use properties of midsegments, perpendicular bisectors, angle bisectors, medians, altitudes, and inequalities involving angles and sides of triangles through a variety of activities.

Activities in this unit include Teachlet® tutorials, worksheets, writing journal activities, Gizmos, and online interactive activities aligned to the textbook through PowerGeometry. You will take a variety of assessments throughout the unit to gauge your comprehension of concepts. You will get instant feedback from self-check assessments embedded in each lesson. You will also complete a portfolio project to assess your understanding of inequalities in a triangle. Other assessments include Quick Checks, quizzes, and a unit test.

Polygons and Quadrilaterals

In this unit, you will examine properties of quadrilaterals and use the properties to prove and classify special types of quadrilaterals such as parallelograms, rectangles, rhombuses, squares, trapezoids, and kites. You will use properties of parallel and perpendicular lines and diagonals to classify quadrilaterals. You will also use theorems to find angle measures of polygons, both interior and exterior angles. You will explore geometry in the coordinate plane through classifying polygons in the coordinate plane with formulas such as slope, midpoint, and distance as well as naming coordinates using variables for a general polygon and proving theorems using coordinate proofs.

You will complete various activities throughout the unit to apply your knowledge. You will create and use Venn diagrams to show the relationships among polygons, equilateral polygons, equiangular polygons, and regular polygons. You will also complete interactive Gizmos to explore angle sums of polygons and properties of special parallelograms, and to classify quadrilaterals. You will watch BrainPOP® movies, Teachlet® tutorials, and homework video tutors throughout the unit to aid instruction. Finally, you will engage in online practice and math writing journal activities to further reinforce understanding of various concepts.

There are self-check activities, feedback, and assessments embedded throughout the unit. Assessments include a portfolio on the coordinate grid system throughout history and a discussion on the coordinate proof, as well as quick checks, quizzes, and a unit test.

Geometry A Semester Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the semester exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you with both the objective questions and essays.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Geometry: On Level

Textbook

  • ¥ Geometry: On Level †

Geometry B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Geometry A

Description:
This is the second of two courses that comprise Geometry. Throughout the course, the student will use virtual manipulatives and tools to explore area, surface area, and volume, and study the concept of similarity as it relates to various figures. The student will use Trigonometry and right triangle concepts, such as 30-60-90, 45-45-90, and the Pythagorean Theorem to solve problems. The student will also be introduced to vectors and learn to solve problems involving magnitude and direction. In addition, the student will study transformation concepts, such as translations, reflections, rotations, and dilations as well as concepts associated with symmetry. The student will learn to use formulas to find the areas of a variety of two-dimensional shapes. This course concludes with an exploration of concepts related to circles, such as arcs, angles, and intersecting lines such as chords, secants, and tangents.

Throughout the course, the student will learn concepts through a variety of instructional strategies, solve real-world applications, and complete an assortment of activities.

Units:

Similarity

In this unit on similarity, you will learn to use ratios to compare quantities, write proportions, and solve problems. You will also use ratios and proportions to determine whether two polygons are similar, to find unknown side lengths of similar figures, and to solve problems relating to scale factor. You will explore similar triangles and related postulates and theorems. You will also use similarity to find indirect measurements in right triangles, as well as the relationship between segments and between lengths. Finally, you will complete a portfolio assessment involving scale drawing.

Right Triangles and Trigonometry

In this unit, you will explore concepts related to right triangles. You will use the Pythagorean Theorem and explore the concept of a Pythagorean triple, as well as properties of special right triangles. You will use trigonometric ratios to find side lengths and angle measures of right triangles. To solve real-world scenarios, you will use angles of elevation and depression. Lastly, you will learn about vectors and use them to describe the magnitude and directions of objects. Your activities include a class discussion involving ramp building codes and a unit portfolio that explores the history and many proofs of the Pythagorean Theorem.

Transformations

Concepts related to transformations are explored in this unit. Students will explore translations, reflections (including glide reflection and compositions of reflections), rotations, and dilations. Students will identify, find, and compose transformations both on and off the coordinate plane. Students will identify isometries as well as the type of symmetry in figures and three-dimensional objects. Students will also use reflection to minimize distance, find angles of rotation, and scale factor for dilation. A variety of activities are used in lessons through out the unit to aid instruction. Activities involving the textbook, Teachlet® tutorials, and movie clips provide information on concepts and using concepts to solve problems. Real-world examples are incorporated into each lesson. A variety of worksheets, such as question worksheets based on examples in the textbook, puzzle worksheets, and practice worksheets involving problem-solving are used to practice concepts and review vocabulary. Math writing journal activities as well as online interactive activities provide discovery learning opportunities for students.

A variety of assessment tools are incorporated into each lesson. Online practices, self-check activities, and feedback are used through out. Assessments such as quick checks, quizzes, and a unit test appear at the end of each lesson. A portfolio involving frieze patterns is also used for assessment purposes.

Area

In this unit, you will explore and find the area of polygons and circles. You will use formulas to find areas of regular polygons, parallelograms, triangles, trapezoids, rhombuses, kites, and circles, including parts of circles such as sectors and segments. You will use trigonometry to find the areas of regular polygons and triangles, as well as the area formula for a triangle given SAS. In addition, you will use 30°-60°-90° and 45°-45°-90° special triangles to find area. You will also learn and apply concepts related to regular polygons, including perimeter and area ratios of similar figures, as well as circle concepts like naming arcs, finding arc measure and length, and finding the circumference of a circle. You will use these concepts to find the area of composite figures and missing dimensions of figures, in addition to using them to solve real-world applications. Finally, you will complete a portfolio project involving circle graphs, and participate in a discussion about Heron’s Formula.

Surface Area and Volume

This unit covers area and volume of three-dimensional solids. The unit begins with defining the polyhedron space figure, the parts of a polyhedron, and examining cross sections. Euler’s Formula is introduced and used to find the number of faces, vertices, or edges of a polyhedron. Students will explore and use formulas to find lateral areas, surface areas, and volume of three-dimensional solids, such as prisms, cylinders, pyramids, cones, and composite figures. Sphere terminology such as center, radius, diameter, great circle, hemispheres, and circumference are explored and defined. Students will use formulas to find the area and volume of spheres. The unit ends with exploring the areas and volumes of similar solids, including identifying similar solids, finding scale factor, and using area and volume ratios to solve problems.

Circles

This unit explores concepts related to circles, such as central angles, inscribed angles, and angles formed by intersecting lines–including chords, tangents, and secants. Students will examine the relationships between angles both inside and outside of a circle and the measure of the intercepted arcs. These relationships, as well as properties of tangents, will be used to solve problems involving angle measure, arc measure, and segment lengths. Students will also explore circles in the coordinate plane, including writing an equation of a circle in standard form. Using radius, circle center, or a point on the circle, students will graph circles in the coordinate plane and be able to identify circle center and radius in an equation of a circle in standard form.A variety of instructional strategies and activities are used to engage students and enhance instruction. Such activities include online Teachlet® tutorials, Gizmo™ activities, math writing journal activities, puzzles, and practice worksheets. Online practice, self-assessment, and problem feedback are included throughout the unit. Students will also complete a unit portfolio involving paper-folding activities to explore properties of chords.

Geometry B Semester Exam

This unit reviews concepts from Semester B of the Geometry course. The unit begins with a review assignment which intends to help the student recall topics from Units 1 through 6. A vocabulary activity explores special terms and properties from the course. Two Quarter Tests are also given for students to practice the concepts from this semester in a more formal format. The assessment is included at the conclusion of the unit in the form of the Semester Exam.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Geometry: On Level

Textbook

  • ¥ Geometry: On Level †

Honors Algebra 1 A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Math 7 and/or Pre-Algebra

Description:
This course is the first of two that comprise Honors Algebra 1. In this course, the student will be exposed to higher-level mathematics. The student will begin by reviewing basic real number operations and properties before learning how to translate between verbal descriptions of real-life situations and data presented in tables, graphs, and equations. Next the student will solve multi-step equations and inequalities. The student will write and graph linear equations in various forms. Other topics in the course include sequences and series, absolute value, rate of change, and set notation. By the end of the course, the student will solve linear systems of equations and inequalities. Throughout the course, the student will solve real-world problems and model real-world scenarios.

Throughout the course, the student will be introduced to multiple problem-solving strategies and will be exposed to various technologies that can be utilized when solving algebra problems.

Units:

Foundations for Algebra

In this unit, you will gain a general introduction to Algebra 1 by reviewing many concepts from previous math courses, including variables, expressions, and real-number operations. This unit will provide you with a solid foundation for the remainder of Algebra 1. You will complete a unit portfolio project in which you will apply your knowledge of using variables to represent unknown and variable quantities, and writing expressions and equations.

Solving Equations

In this unit, you will learn how to solve problems using a variety of problem-solving strategies including tables, graphs, and equations. This unit also includes instruction on solving one, two, or multi-step equations, a skill that is essential to your continuing knowledge of higher-level mathematics. You will complete a variety of assessments in this unit, including quick checks, quizzes, and a unit test.

Solving Inequalities

In this unit, you will learn how to solve inequalities that require one or more steps. You will also learn how to graph the solutions to inequalities on the number line. Set notation will be introduced as a tool for expressing the solutions to inequalities. Finally, you will explore absolute value equations and inequalities and the union and intersection of sets.

Introduction to Functions

In this unit, you will explore functions and their applications. You will be introduced to the characteristics of a function and be able to compare linear and nonlinear functions. You will also graph functions on the coordinate plane and write functions given their graph. Functions are an important part of algebra because they lay a foundation for understanding higher-level mathematics problems. This unit will also introduce you to key vocabulary terms used when describing functions.

Linear Functions

In this unit, you will learn how to use several types of linear equations, including slope-intercept, point-slope, and standard forms. You will use slope to compare parallel and perpendicular lines and explore relationships between those types of lines. You will also graph and translate absolute value functions on the coordinate plane.

Systems of Equations and Inequalities

In this unit, you will apply what you know about linear equations and inequalities to systems of linear equations or inequalities. You will solve systems of linear equations by graphing, substitution, or elimination. You will also be introduced to the topic of matrices and use them to solve systems of equations. You will graph linear inequalities and solve systems of two linear equalities. Finally, you will apply these topics to solve real-world scenarios. In this unit, you will apply what you know about linear equations and inequalities to systems of linear equations or inequalities. You will solve systems of linear equations by graphing, substitution, or elimination. You will also be introduced to the topic of matrices and use them to solve systems of equations. You will graph linear inequalities and solve systems of two linear equalities. Finally, you will apply these topics to solve real-world scenarios.

Honors Algebra 1 A Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the semester exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Algebra 1: On Level

Textbook

  • ¥ Algebra 1: On Level †

Honors Algebra 1 B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Algebra 1 A

Description:
This course is the second of two that comprise Honors Algebra 1. In this course, the student will explore additional concepts in higher-level mathematics. The student will review the properties of exponents before learning how to add, subtract, multiply, divide, and factor polynomials. Next the student will learn how to write, solve, and graph quadratic and radical functions. Other topics in the course include simplifying scientific notation, simplifying radicals, trigonometric equations, and rational expressions. The end of the course concludes with a data analysis and probability unit, where the student will organize data using matrices, interpret histograms, calculate and interpret the measures of central tendency, find probability, and find permutations and combinations. Throughout the course, the student will solve real-world problems and model real-world scenarios.

Throughout the course, the student will be introduced to multiple problem-solving strategies and will be exposed to various technologies that can be utilized when solving algebra problems.

Units:

Exponents and Exponential Functions

In this unit, you will learn about expressions involving exponents in several forms. You will learn about zero and negative exponents and use what you know about exponents to solve problems using standard and scientific notation. You will learn and apply the rules for multiplication and division of expressions involving exponents. Finally, you will evaluate exponential functions and use exponential functions to solve real world problems of exponential growth and decay.

Polynomials and Factoring

In this unit, you will learn how to classify, add, and subtract polynomials. You will also learn to multiply polynomials and monomials, and how to factor polynomials using GCF, squares of a binomial, sum and difference of squares, and product of a sum and difference, and how to factor higher-degree polynomials.

Quadratic Functions and Equations

In this unit, you will learn how to work with quadratic functions and quadratic equations. You will learn to graph functions in several forms and solve both quadratic equations and quadratic functions. You will also learn to choose between different models to display data, and finally, you will solve systems of linear and quadratic equations. These topics will be important foundational skills for your study of higher-level mathematics.

Radical Expressions and Equations

In this unit, you will work with radicals applied to many different types of problems. To begin, you will work with the Pythagorean Theorem and right triangles, and use radicals in your solutions to those problems. Then you will learn to simplify and rationalize radicals, followed by solving problems using radicals in expressions and equations. You will learn to identify extraneous solutions to radical equations and graph their solutions. Finally, you will find and use trigonometric ratios and apply what you have learned to real-world scenarios.

Rational Expressions and Functions

In this unit, you will work with rational expressions and equations. To begin, you will learn to simplify rational expressions. Then you will learn to multiply and divide rational expressions and polynomials. You will also learn to simplify complex fractions. These skills will allow you to add and subtract rational expressions, and solve rational equations and proportions. You will learn to define inverse variations and compare direct and inverse variations. Finally, you will learn to graph rational functions.

Data Analysis and Probability

In this unit, you will explore data analysis and probability. To begin, you will organize data in a matrix form and learn to add, subtract, and perform scalar multiplication using matrices. You will work with various graphic representations of data including tables, histograms, box-and-whisker plots, and line graphs. Using data, you will explore measures of central tendency including mean, median, mode, and range. Finally, you will work with permutations, combinations, and independent and dependent events.

Semester B Exam and Review

This unit reviews concepts from Semester B of the Honors Algebra 1 course. The unit begins with a review assignment to help you recall topics from Units 1–6. You will also spend time utilizing the one page review guides created at the end of each unit. These review guides contain key vocabulary, points to remember, and sample problems that you can rework. Practice opportunities from the textbook are included. The assessment is included at the conclusion of the unit in the form of the semester exam.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Algebra 1: On Level

Textbook

  • ¥ Algebra 1: On Level †

Honors Algebra 2 A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Algebra 1 and Geometry

Description:
In this first semester of Honors Algebra 2, the student will review and expand on his learning from previous math courses. This honors-level course will challenge the student to work at an accelerated pace and to take learning beyond what is required in the standard-level course. The beginning units will focus mostly on the equation and the inequality, which the student will write, solve, and graph in a variety of real-world scenarios. The last few units will focus on types of functions. The student will continue his study of quadratic and radical functions from Algebra 1, but will expand this to include exponential and logarithmic functions. As before, the student will write, solve, and graph these functions. Use of a graphing calculator is encouraged.

Units:

Expressions, Equations, and Inequalities

In this unit, you will explore algebraic expressions, equations, and inequalities, including how to model and solve real-world applications using these concepts. Some of these concepts, such as those involved in simplifying algebraic expressions and solving equations, are a review from previous math courses, and other concepts, such as those concerned with writing and solving equations and inequalities involving absolute value, are new for this course. The concepts presented in this unit will be used throughout this course, as they are the basics of Algebra 2.

Functions, Equations, and Graphs

In this unit, you will expand your knowledge of equations by exploring relations that can be represented by special equations, called functions. Direct variation, linear, and absolute value functions and their graphs will be used to solve a variety of problems. You will learn how functions can be used to model real-world data using a scatter plot and a line of best fit. In addition, you will learn the different forms in which a linear equation can be written as well as identify transformations of functions, such as vertical and horizontal translations, reflection, stretching, and compressing.

Linear Systems

In this unit, you will learn about linear systems and how to use them to solve problems that come up in real situations. Throughout the unit, you will explore the different methods for solving systems, such as using tables, graphs, or matrices, and the different ways in which a system can be solved algebraically. Linear programming will be used to solve real-world problems, such as ones involving maximizing profit.

Quadratic Functions and Equations

In this unit, you will explore quadratic equations and functions. You will see that when a quadratic equation is graphed, it forms a particular type of curve called a parabola. Some real-world situations can be modeled by parabolas—for example, the path a baseball makes when thrown up in the air. You will learn how to use multiple methods for solving quadratic equations including graphing, factoring, completing the square, and applying the quadratic formula. Lastly, you will explore the set of complex numbers and quadratic systems.

Polynomials and Polynomial Functions

Previously, you explored a specific type of polynomial, a quadratic polynomial. In this unit, you will explore a variety of polynomials, including monomials, binomials, and trinomials. You will learn how to identify and describe the properties of polynomials equations based on the powers of the variable terms they contain. In addition, you will learn methods to identify and represent factors, zeroes, and x-intercepts of polynomial functions. You will identify the features of polynomial functions and their graphs and use them to model real-world situations such as maximizing the volume of a box and representing energy with power functions. You will also be introduced to methods and theorems that you will apply to solve polynomial equations.

Honors Algebra 2 B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Honors Algebra 2 A

Description:
In this second semester of Honors Algebra 2, the students will strengthen his algebraic problem-solving abilities and deepen his understanding of mathematics. An empasis will be placed on rigorous instruction to prepare students for success in higher-level mathematics courses like Statistics and Calculus. The student will, among other things, explore cross-sections of three-dimensional figures, calculate probabilities, and perform operations on matrices. The course will conclude with an introduction to trigonometry and its associated functions.

Units:

Rational Functions

You are designing a rectangular garden. You have enough soil for a garden that is 64 square feet in area. Think about the different possible dimensions for the length and width of a rectangular-shaped garden with this area. The table shows that as the length of the garden increases, the width decreases, and as the width of the garden increases, the length decreases. In other words, the length and width vary inversely. As one side increases, the other side decreases. In this lesson, you will learn how to recognize inverse variation functions and apply inverse variation to solve problems.

Sequences and Series

In this unit, you will explore different types of patterns in arithmetic and geometric sequences. You will identify mathematical patterns and create a rule to describe a pattern. Finally, you will find the sum of an arithmetic or geometric series, or use the sum of a series to determine the number of terms.

Quadratic Relations and Conic Sections

Different types of curves are formed when a plane and a cone intersect, depending on the angle of intersection. In this unit, you will explore these different types of conic sections, referred to as parabolas, circles, ellipses, and hyperbolas. You will learn about their graphs and equations, and how to use these conic sections to model and solve problems.

Honors Geometry A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Algebra 1

Description:
This course is the first of two that comprise Honors Geometry. In this course, the student will explore geometry concepts and apply them to real-world problems. The student will begin by defining basic geometric terms, postulates, and theorems before learning how to apply them to parallel and perpendicular lines. Next, the student will explore relationships in triangles, quadrilaterals, and other polygons.

Throughout the course, the student will be introduced to many higher mathematical concepts and applications.

Units:

Tools of Geometry

This unit introduces various topics in geometry. The beginning of the unit involves representing three-dimensional solid figures using nets, isometric drawings, and orthographic drawings. Special drawing techniques are introduced, such as slanted lines to represent three-dimensional perspective and dashed lines to represent hidden lines. An introduction to basic geometry terms such as points, lines, and planes is included. These are introduced as the building blocks of geometry on which all other geometry terms are defined. Postulates and axioms are introduced as well as naming techniques.Measuring segments and angles are introduced along with the Ruler Postulate, Segment Addition Postulate, Protractor Postulate, and Angle Addition Postulate. Types of angles as well as special angle pairs and their relationships are included. The degree unit is introduced and the use of a protractor to find angle measure is included. A ruler is also used to find segment length. Problems involving algebra, such as solving linear equations, are used to find segment lengths and angle measures. The concept of creating constructions without the use of measurement by using only a straightedge and protractor is introduced in this unit. Four basic constructions are included, such as constructing congruent segments, congruent angles, perpendicular bisectors, and angle bisectors. These constructions will be used to create other constructions, such as an equilateral triangle. They will also be used to solve problems, such as creating a 45o angle.

The unit concludes with finding the midpoint of segments on a number line and on a coordinate plane using the midpoint formulas. The distance formula is used to find the distance between two points in a coordinate place. Algebra skills are reviewed as necessary for solving problems using midpoint and distance formulas. Other formulas included at the end of the unit are formulas used to find perimeter, circumference, and area of geometric figures such as squares, rectangles, triangles, and circles. The area of a region is also explored.

Many new vocabulary terms associated with the topics are included. A variety of real-world applications are embedded throughout the unit. A variety of activities are also used to enhance instruction, such as BrainPOP® movies, Gizmos, Discovery Educationstreaming movies, SkillsTutor™, and PowerGeometry. Assessments in Unit 1 include quick checks, quizzes, a unit portfolio involving origami, a discussion on how math is used in daily life, and a Unit Test.

Standard Geometry

This unit focuses on topics related to reasoning and writing formal proofs. In the beginning of this unit, students will observe patterns in numeric and geometrical sequences and use inductive reasoning to make conjectures. Then conditional statements are explored, including converses, inverses, and contrapositives. Biconditionals are used to help define and create good definitions. Formal notation is emphasized in the use of a truth table to examine the validity of an argument.

The unit continues with students exploring deductive reasoning using both the Law of Detachment and Law of Syllogism. These reasoning skills will be applied to evaluate a set of clues and then formulate a possible solution. Students will then use deductive reasoning and the Properties of Equality to justify steps when solving an equation.

The conclusion of the unit introduces two types of formal proofs, two-column proofs and paragraph proofs. Properties of Congruence as well as theorems involving angles are included. Students will learn how to set-up a two-column proof and will be given tips on writing formal proofs. Acceptable reasons to use in proofs are specified.

Students will be assessed through-out the unit with a variety of assessments, such as quick checks, quizzes, a portfolio project involving how Greeks used deductive reasoning and mathematics, a discussion on inductive and deductive reasoning, and a unit test.

Parallel and Perpendicular Lines

In this unit, you will explore concepts associated with parallel and perpendicular lines. You will begin by identifying parallel, perpendicular, and skew lines, as well as parallel and perpendicular planes. You will prove the theorems and postulate for the special angle pairs and use them to find angle measures. Then you will use the converse of these theorems and postulate to prove lines parallel. You will also learn the different forms of proofs, such as two-column, paragraph, and flow proofs. You will practice using different theorems and making new constructions. Finally, you will apply concepts related to linear equations in a coordinate plane, and slope relationships of parallel and perpendicular lines.

Congruent Triangles

This unit covers concepts associated with congruent triangles, such as identifying corresponding parts of congruent triangles, identifying isosceles and equilateral triangles, proving triangles congruent, and proving parts of triangles congruent. Lessons build on students’ understanding and skills related to angles and triangles. Visualization skills are used for overlapping triangles. Theorems and postulates such as SSS, SAS, ASA, AAS, and HL are introduced throughout the unit. The definition corresponding parts of congruent triangles are congruent (CPCTC) is used to prove parts of triangles congruent. Students will use and apply properties of isosceles and equilateral triangles. Students will also prove two triangles congruent using other congruent triangles. The difference between congruence and similarity is introduced for further units of study.

A variety of methods are used throughout the unit for instruction, practice, and review of concepts. Students will complete worksheets and online practice for various concepts. Math writing journal activities require students to relate concepts to real-world applications and apply their knowledge in order to respond to thought-provoking questions. Hands-on exploration activities are provided through the Concept Byte activities in the textbook. Online and interactive activities, such as Teachlet® tutorials, SkillsTutor™, and Gizmos are used to further students’ understanding of concepts.

Various assessments are used throughout the unit to measure student progress such as Quick Checks, quizzes, and a unit test. Students will also complete a unit portfolio which involves viewing a Discovery Education™ streaming movie about the role of math in the design, technology, and construction of modern skyscrapers and ancient Greek architecture using triangles. Students will then complete related tasks involving architecture and triangles to complete the portfolio.

Triangles

In this unit, students will be discovering, exploring, and learning concepts involving relationships within triangles. Students will expand on the skills learned in previous units, such as using the midpoint formula to find the midsegments of triangles and the distance formula to examine relationships in triangles. New theorems are introduced, such as the Triangle Midsegment Theorem, Perpendicular Bisector Theorem, Angle Bisector Theorem, and Hinge Theorem. Also included are theorems related to concurrency in triangles and triangle inequality. There will be an emphasis on coordinate geometry and applications to linear equations. Students will explore relationships within a triangle using the Comparison Property of Inequality and the Corollary to the Triangle Exterior Angle Theorem, as well as those theorems related to triangle inequality. The relationships between two triangles will be explored through the Hinge Theorem and its converse.

Students will identify and use properties of midsegments, perpendicular bisectors, angle bisectors, medians, altitudes, and inequalities involving angles and sides of triangles through a variety of activities. These activities are designed and used for instruction, review, and practice of concepts in order to engage students throughout the Unit. Activities in this unit include Teachlet® tutorials, worksheets, writing journal activities, Gizmos, and online interactive activities aligned to the textbook through PowerGeometry.

A variety of assessments are used throughout the unit to gauge student comprehension of concepts. Self-check assessments are embedded in each lesson and provide students with feedback. A portfolio is used to assess concepts of inequalities in a triangle which requires students to complete three activities using straws of various lengths to create triangles. Other assessments include Quick Checks, quizzes, and a unit test.

Polygons and Quadrilaterals

In this unit, students will examine properties of quadrilaterals and use the properties to prove and classify special types of quadrilaterals, such as parallelograms, rectangles, rhombuses, squares, trapezoids, and kites. Properties of parallel and perpendicular lines and diagonals will be used to classify quadrilaterals. Students will use theorems to find angle measures of polygons, both interior and exterior angles. Geometry in the coordinate plane will be explored through classifying polygons in the coordinate plane using formulas such as slope, midpoint, and distance, as well as naming coordinates using variables for a general polygon and proving theorems using coordinate proofs. Students will be exposed to the polar graphing system.

Various activities are used throughout the unit to support student learning. Students are encouraged to create and use Venn diagrams to show the relationships among polygons, equilateral polygons, equiangular polygons, and regular polygons. Interactive Gizmos are used throughout the unit to explore angle sums of polygons, properties of special parallelograms, and to classify quadrilaterals. Worksheets will help to review vocabulary, enhance instruction, and practice concepts. Students will view a BrainPOP® movie clip on the types of triangles. Teachlet® tutorials and homework video tutors are used throughout the unit to aid instruction. Online practice and math writing journal activities are used to encourage student thinking and understanding of various concepts.

Self-check activities, feedback, and assessments are embedded throughout the unit. A portfolio on the coordinate grid system throughout history and a discussion on the coordinate proof serve as assessments. Other assessments include Quick Checks, quizzes, and a unit test.

Semester A Exam and Review

This unit reviews concepts from Semester A of the Geometry course. The unit begins with a review assignment that helps students recall topics from Units 1–6. A matching and vocabulary activity explores special terms and properties from the course. Practice opportunities such as online practice, textbook problems, and worksheets are included. The assessment is included at the conclusion of the unit in the form of the semester exam.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Geometry: On Level

Textbook

  • ¥ Geometry: On Level †

Honors Geometry B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Honors Geometry A

Description:
This course is the second of two that comprise Honors Geometry. In this course, the student will expand his knowledge of geometric relationships. The student will begin by developing relationships between similar figures before learning how to apply them to transformation. Next, the student will be introduced to the trigonometric relationships in right triangles, and the area and volume of figures. Finally, the student will explore characteristics of circles. Throughout the course, the student will be introduced to many higher mathematical concepts and applications.

Units:

Similarity

The focus of this unit is similarity. You will use ratios to compare quantities, write proportions, and solve problems. Next, you will use ratios and proportions to determine whether two polygons are similar, to find unknown side lengths of similar figures, and to solve problems relating to scale factor. You will also explore similar triangles and the AA Similarity Postulate, SAS Similarity Theorem, and SSS Similarity Theorem to prove triangles similar. You will next use similarity to find indirect measurements using geometric mean relationships in right triangles where the altitude is drawn to the hypotenuse. The relationship between the segments formed when two or more parallel lines intersect other lines, and the relationship between lengths formed by an angle bisector in a triangle are further concepts you will practice, as well as the Side-Splitter Theorem and the Triangle-Angle-Bisector Theorem. Finally, you will explore fractals and the golden ratio, and complete a portfolio project involving a scale drawing.

Right Triangles and Trigonometry

In this unit, you will explore concepts related to right triangles. You will use the Pythagorean Theorem and explore the concept of a Pythagorean triple, as well as properties of special right triangles. You will use trigonometric ratios to find side lengths and angle measures of right triangles. To solve real-world scenarios, you will use angles of elevation and depression. Lastly, you will learn about vectors and use them to describe the magnitude and directions of objects. Your activities include a class discussion involving ramp building codes and a unit portfolio that explores the history and many proofs of the Pythagorean Theorem.

Transformations

You will explore concepts related to transformations in this unit: translations, reflections (including glide reflection and compositions of reflections), rotations, and dilations. You will identify, find, and compose transformations both on and off the coordinate plane. You will then identify isometries as well as the type of symmetry in figures and three-dimensional objects. You will also use reflection to minimize distance, find angles of rotation, and find scale factor for dilation. Finally, you will explore how transformations are made in the three-dimensional coordinate graphing system, evaluate polygons to see if they form a tessellation, and complete a portfolio involving frieze patterns.

Area

In this unit, you will explore and find the area of polygons and circles. You will use formulas to find areas of regular polygons, parallelograms, triangles, trapezoids, rhombuses, kites, and circles, including parts of circles, such as sectors and segments. You will use trigonometry to find the areas of regular polygons and triangles as well as the area formula for a triangle given SAS. In addition, you will use 30°-60°-90° and 45°-45°-90° special triangles to find area. You will also learn and apply concepts related to regular polygons, including perimeter and area ratios of similar figures, as well as circle concepts like naming arcs, finding arc measure and length, and finding the circumference of a circle. You will use these concepts to find the area of composite figures and missing dimensions of figures as well as to solve real-world applications. Finally, you will complete a portfolio project involving circle graphs and participate in a discussion about Heron’s Formula.

Surface Area and Volume

This unit covers area and volume of three-dimensional solids. You will begin with the definition of a polyhedron space figure, the parts of a polyhedron, and its cross sections. You will then use Euler’s Formula to find the number of faces, vertices, or edges of a polyhedron. You will also explore and use formulas to find lateral areas, surface areas, and volume of such three-dimensional solids as prisms, cylinders, pyramids, cones, and composite figures. The revolution of regions to create three-dimensional objects like cylinders and cones will help you visualize the creation of these models. You will explore the sphere concepts of center, radius, diameter, great circle, hemispheres, and circumference, and use formulas to find the area and volume of spheres. Finally, you will finish the unit by exploring the areas and volumes of similar solids, including identifying similar solids, finding scale factor, and using area and volume ratios to solve problems.

Circles

This unit explores concepts related to circles, such as central angles, inscribed angles, and angles formed by intersecting lines, including chords, tangents, and secants. You will examine the relationships between angles both inside and outside of a circle and also the measure of the intercepted arcs. You will then use these relationships, as well as properties of tangents, to solve problems involving angle measure, arc measure, and segment lengths. Next, you will explore circles in the coordinate plane, including writing an equation of a circle in standard form. Finally, using radius, circle center, or a point on the circle, you will graph circles in the coordinate plane and be able to identify circle center and radius in an equation of a circle in standard form.

Geometry B Semester Exam

In this unit, you will prepare for and take the Geometry B Semester Exam.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Geometry: On Level

Textbook

  • ¥ Geometry: On Level †

Honors Precalculus A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Algebra 2

Description:
This course, which includes a more rigorous curriculum and opportunities for critical thinking and enrichment, is an in-depth study of functions and a review of algebraic, geometric, and trigonometric principles and techniques. Students investigate and explore the characteristics of linear, polynomial, and trigonometric functions, and use graphing calculators to solve and evaluate various functions, equations, and inequalities.

Units:

Linear Relations and Functions

In this unit, you will review previously learned mathematical principles and extend prior mathematical knowledge. Concepts emphasized in this unit will reappear throughout the course, so take the time to complete each lesson carefully.

As you work through the unit, you will have the opportunity to review properties and operations of linear and nonlinear relations and functions. You will focus on the concepts of function composition and use these concepts to graph functions. You will also review how to write linear equations as well as equations for parallel and perpendicular lines. Then, you will use these concepts to model real-world situations that involve linear functions. Finally, you will identify and graph piecewise functions.

Systems of Linear Equations and Inequalities

In this unit, you will evaluate and graph systems of equations with two and three variables. You will review how to add, subtract, and multiply matrices. Then, you will use matrices to model motion and solve systems of equations using the inverses of matrices. You will also solve systems of linear inequalities by graphing and locating the minimum and maximum values. Finally, you will be introduced to linear programming procedures and use these procedures to solve real-world linear programming problems.

The Nature of Graphs

In this unit, you will analyze and create graphs to solve many real-world situations. First, you will perform tests on a graph to determine if the graph of a relation is symmetrical. You will also identify and sketch linear and nonlinear families of graphs, including transformations, polynomials, absolute value, and radical inequalities. Then, you will solve and graph inverses of relations and functions problems. You will identify and evaluate continuity, end behavior, critical points, and extrema of functions. Finally, you will graph radical functions and solve direct, inverse, and joint variation problems.

Polynomial and Rational Functions

In this unit, you will continue your study of polynomial and rational functions. You will find the roots of polynomial equations as well as use the discriminant to describe the roots of quadratic equations. You will calculate the factors of a polynomial using the Remainder, Factor, and Rational Root Theorems. Then, you will solve rational equations and decompose a fraction into partial fractions. You will also solve radical equations and inequalities using the same procedures you learned throughout this unit. Finally, you will use polynomial functions to solve real-world situations.

The Trigonometric Functions

In this unit, you will explore trigonometric functions. You will review angle and degree measure concepts as well as how to calculate the values for the trigonometric ratios using a right triangle. You will find the values of the six trigonometric rations using the unit circle. Then, you will apply your knowledge of trigonometry to determine inverse trigonometric functions, to find missing angle and side measures, and to solve right triangles. Finally, you will explore and solve problems using the Law of Sines and the Law of Cosines.

Graphs of Trigonometric Functions

In this unit, you will continue your study of trigonometry by examining graphs of trigonometric functions. You will review angle and radian measure concepts including radian and degree measure, arc length, and area of a sector. You will explore linear and angular velocity. Then, you will examine the graphs for the sine and cosine functions. In addition, you will learn how to calculate the amplitude and period as well as translate the graphs for the sine and cosine functions. Finally, you will graph other trigonometric functions including secant, cosecant, tangent, and cotangent functions as well as graph inverse trigonometric functions.

Trigonometric Identities and Equations

In this unit, you will identify trigonometric identities and solve trigonometric equations. You will explore reciprocal, quotient, Pythagorean, symmetry, and opposite-angle trigonometric identities and use them to verify other trigonometric identities. Then, you will learn and solve trigonometric equations and inequalities using the sum, difference, double-angle, and half-angle identities. Finally, you will learn how to write a linear equation in normal form and find the distance from a point to a line.

Honors Precalculus A Final

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Advanced Mathematical Concepts

Textbook

  • ¥ Glencoe Advanced Mathematical Concepts †

Honors Precalculus B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Honors Precalculus A

Description:
The second course in Honors Precalculus examines vectors and parametric equations, complex numbers, and exponential and logarithmic functions. The final unit introduces students to the fundamentals of calculus. Mathematical reasoning and problem solving skills are stressed as students prepare for future high school or college coursework in calculus. This Honors level course includes more rigorous curriculum and greater opportunities for students explore concepts and demonstrate critical thinking skills.

Units:

Vectors and Parametric Equations

In this unit, you will review previously learned mathematical principles and extend prior mathematical knowledge. Concepts emphasized in this unit will reappear throughout the course, so take the time to complete each lesson carefully.As you work through the unit, you will be introduced to vectors and parametric equations. You will explore vector notation, including terms such as magnitude, direction, and resultant. You will learn how to add, subtract, and multiply vectors algebraically and geometrically. Then, you will determine if two vectors are perpendicular by finding their cross product. You will write, solve, and graph two-dimensional and three-dimensional vector and parametric equation problems. Finally, you will use your knowledge of vectors to solve real-world applications involving vectors.

Polar Coordinates and Complex Numbers

In this unit, you will expand your knowledge of complex numbers and be introduced to polar coordinates. You will continue your study of polar coordinates by graphing polar equations, converting polar and rectangular coordinates, and writing the polar form of a linear equation. Then, you will learn how to add, subtract, multiply, and divide complex numbers in rectangular form as well as multiply and divide complex numbers in polar form. Finally, you will use De Moivre’s Theorem to calculate the powers and roots of complex numbers.

Conics

In this unit, you will review and expand your knowledge of geometry. You will review how to find the distance and midpoint using a coordinate plane and prove geometric relationships. Then, you will use algebra to write and graph the standard and general form of an equation for circles, ellipses, hyperbolas, and parabolas. You will explore rectangular and parametric forms of conic sections. You will identify the discriminant and graph conic transformations. Finally, you will solve systems of second-degree equations and inequalities.

Exponential and Logarithmic Functions

In this unit, you will explore exponential and logarithmic functions. You will evaluate and simplify rational exponent expressions and equations, graph exponential equations and functions, and solve exponential growth and decay problems using the number e. Then, you will solve equations and inequalities involving common and natural logarithms. Finally, you will model real-world situations with exponential and logarithmic functions.

Sequences and Series

In this unit, you will continue your study of sequences and series. You will identify and use formulas to generate mathematical patterns, arithmetic sequences, and geometric sequences. You will explore limits and use them to evaluate infinite arithmetic and geometric sequences and series. Then, you will analyze a series to determine if it convergent or divergent. You will write a series in sigma notation using the nth term. You will learn the Binomial Theorem and use it to solve special sequences and series. Finally, you will solve and graph functions using iteration and prove conjectures using mathematical induction.

Combinatorics and Probability

In this unit, you will extend your knowledge of probability. You will review the Counting Principle, independent and dependent events, permutations, and combinations. You will explore permutations with repetitions and circular combinations. Then, you will solve problems that involve the probability of an event, odds, probability of a compound event, and conditional probability. Finally, you will find the probability of an event using the Binomial Theorem.

Statistics and Data Analysis

In this unit, you will explore statistics and data analysis methods. You will draw and interpret data using bar graphs, line plots, back-to-back bar graphs, three-dimensional bar graphs, and histograms. You will calculate measures of central tendency for a set of data. Then, you will analyze data using measures of variability including range, quartiles, interquartile range, semi-interquartile range, mean deviation, and standard deviation. You will explore normal distributions. Finally, you will determine the standard error of the mean and level of confidence for a sample set of data.

Calculus

In this unit, you will be introduced to the fundamental concepts in calculus. You will calculate limits for polynomial and rational functions. Then, you will explore derivatives and antiderivatives in polynomial functions. You will calculate the area under a curve using integrals. Finally, you will evaluate definite and indefinite integrals of a polynomial function using the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.

Honors Precalculus B Final

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Advanced Mathematical Concepts

Textbook

  • ¥ Glencoe Advanced Mathematical Concepts †

Pre-Algebra A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the first of two courses that comprise Pre-Algebra. In this course, the student will be introduced to basic algebraic principles. The student will review properties of expressions and integers. The student will solve one-step equations and inequalities with positive and negative integers, decimals, fractions, and exponents. Then, the student will explore problems involving decimals and fractions and learn to apply the rules of divisibility to solving expressions. Finally, the student will apply their knowledge of algebra to solve real-world ratio, proportion, and percent problems. The semester ends with lessons devoted specifically to test-taking skills and strategies, which reinforce the skills taught throughout the semester.

Units:

Algebraic Expressions and Integers

In this unit you will be introduced to the basic language of Algebra by reviewing and building upon concepts from previous courses including integers, the order of operations, and comparing whole numbers. This unit provides instruction in the foundational skills of Pre-Algebra including the use of variable and expressions, positive and negative integers, and logical thinking. You will begin a math journal which you will use throughout this course to help you organize and review key words and concepts. Your journal will be a valuable tool throughout your study of Pre-Algebra.

Solving One-Step Equations and Inequalities

In this unit, you will be introduced to the basic algebraic properties you will need to solve equations and inequalities. You will use the Associative, Commutative, and Identity Properties for both addition and multiplication to simplify expressions. This unit provides instruction in the foundational skills of solving and graphing one-step equations and inequalities by applying inverse operations. You will continue to build on these skills throughout your study of algebra. As you progress through this unit, you will add key concepts and examples to your math journal.

Decimals and Equations

In this unit, you will begin your study of decimals and equations. You will review rounding and comparing decimals and use these skills to estimate decimal sums, differences, products, and quotients. You will also work with decimals in formulas and in solving equations involving decimals. You will be introduced to the measures of central tendency and complete a data project that you will submit as a portfolio assessment. You will build on your skills in working with decimals as you convert from one unit to another in the metric system. As you progress through the unit, you will continue to add new concepts and examples to your math journal.

Divisibility Rules

In this unit, you will learn how to use divisibility rules to find prime factorizations and greatest common factors, and you will apply these skills to simplify fractions, including fractions with variables. You will begin your study of exponents by learning to add, subtract, multiply, and divide expressions containing powers with the same base. This unit provides instruction in recognizing rational numbers and simplifying expressions that contain powers. The unit concludes with a real-world activity in which you will apply your knowledge of factors and multiples. As you progress through this unit, you will continue to add new concepts and vocabulary words to your math journal.

Operations with Fractions

In this unit, you will build on your knowledge of fractions to perform basic operations with fractions as well as to compare and order fractions. You will use your skills with fractions to solve equations by adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing fractions. This unit also provides instruction in converting decimals to fractions and fractions to decimals. You will choose whether to use fractions or decimals to solve real-world problems. You will learn to use fractions to convert customary units of measure by a process called dimensional analysis. The unit concludes with learning to solve a real-life problem by working backward. Finally, you will continue to add new concepts, vocabulary words, and examples to your math journal as you progress through this unit.

Ratios, Proportions, and Percents

In this unit, you will expand your knowledge of percents and proportions by defining and solving problems involving ratios, rates, and unit rates. Then, you will use these concepts to solve similar figure, scale drawing, probability, and odds problems. You will also learn how to rewrite a percent as a ratio, in fraction form, and as a decimal in order to solve equations. Finally, you will learn how to find markup, discount, and percent of change by using percents.

Semester Review and Exam

In this unit, you will review the skills taught in the first semester of Pre-Algebra. The content on the exam covers units 1–6.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Pre-Algebra

Textbook

  • ¥ Pre-Algebra †

Pre-Algebra B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the second of two courses that comprise Pre-Algebra. In this course, the student will explore basic algebraic principles. The student will examine and evaluate two-step and multi-step equations and inequalities and then explore and use graphs to solve linear relations and functions. Next, the student will be introduced to basic concepts of geometry including angle relationships, parallel lines, polygons, circles, and transformations. Next, the student will apply their knowledge of geometry and algebra to solve area and volume problems. Then, the student will explore nonlinear functions and polynomials. Finally, the students will examine properties of right triangles, data analysis, and probability.

Units:

Solving Equations and Inequalities

In this unit you will learn to solve two-step equations, multi-step equations, and two-step inequalities by using properties of mathematics. Those same properties will guide you through the process of transforming formulas to solve for a given variable. You will also learn methods that will make working with fractions a little easier. You will use formulas to compute simple and compound interest and solve problems by constructing a table.

Linear Functions and Graphing

In this unit, you will learn the difference between a function and a relation, then learn how to graph linear equations by plotting points and by using the slope-intercept form of a line. You will learn to write rules for linear equations by analyzing a table and applying that knowledge to real-world scenarios. You will then use your graphing knowledge to find trends and make predictions from scatter plots, and you will solve systems of equations and inequalities by graphing. You will also graph some non-linear functions.

Spatial Thinking

This unit starts with identifying basic geometry figures and then moves to angle measures and relationships. You will learn to identify and classify triangles and quadrilaterals, determine whether two triangles are congruent, and identify the corresponding parts. You will also learn about symmetry and use tables and proportions to create circle graphs, becoming familiar with a protractor and compass. The unit finishes with a study of translations, reflections, and rotations.

Area and Volume

This unit shows you how to identify various two dimensional and three dimensional shapes. You will also learn to find area, surface area, and volume of many different shapes. You first learn by looking at a sketch and using nest and finally by learning formulas. You will also learn problem-solving skills involving drawing diagrams and making models.

Right Triangles and Polynomials

In this unit, you will learn about the different types of real numbers. You will also use the Pythagorean theorem, Distance Formula, and Midpoint Formulas. You will work with special triangle relationships and use trigonometric ratios to solve problems including angles of elevation and depression. You will use both arithmetic and geometric sequences to describe number patterns. Finally, you will define, add, and subtract polynomials.

Data and Probability

In this unit, you will work with data displays and probability. To begin, you will learn to use several different types of data displays, including frequency tables, line plots, histograms, and box-and-whisker plots. Then you will learn to calculate probability and odds for independent or dependent events. Finally, you will use combinations and permutations, learn about population sampling and solve problems using simulations.

Semester B Exam

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Pre-Algebra

Textbook

  • ¥ Pre-Algebra †

Precalculus A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion Algebra 2

Description:
This course is an in-depth study of functions and a review of algebraic, geometric, and trigonometric principles and techniques. Students investigate and explore the characteristics of linear, polynomial, and trigonometric functions, and use graphing calculators to solve and evaluate various functions, equations, and inequalities.

Units:

Linear Relations and Functions

In this unit, you will review previously learned mathematical principles and extend prior mathematical knowledge. Concepts emphasized in this unit will reappear throughout the course, so take the time to complete each lesson carefully.

As you work through the unit, you will have the opportunity to review properties and operations of linear and nonlinear relations and functions. You will focus on the concepts of function composition and use these concepts to graph functions. You will also review how to write linear equations as well as equations for parallel and perpendicular lines. Then, you will use these concepts to model real-world situations that involve linear functions. Finally, you will identify and graph piecewise functions.

Systems of Linear Equations and Inequalities

In this unit, you will evaluate and graph systems of equations with two and three variables. You will review how to add, subtract, and multiply matrices. Then, you will use matrices to model motion and solve systems of equations using the inverses of matrices. You will also solve systems of linear inequalities by graphing and locating the minimum and maximum values. Finally, you will be introduced to linear programming procedures and use these procedures to solve real-world linear programming problems.

The Nature of Graphs

In this unit, you will analyze and create graphs to solve many real-world situations. First, you will perform tests on a graph to determine if the graph of a relation is symmetrical. You will also identify and sketch linear and nonlinear families of graphs, including transformations, polynomials, absolute value, and radical inequalities. Then, you will solve and graph inverses of relations and functions problems. You will identify and evaluate continuity, end behavior, critical points, and extrema of functions. Finally, you will graph radical functions and solve direct, inverse, and joint variation problems.

Polynomial and Rational Functions

In this unit, you will continue your study of polynomial and rational functions. You will find the roots of polynomial equations as well as use the discriminant to describe the roots of quadratic equations. You will calculate the factors of a polynomial using the Remainder, Factor, and Rational Root Theorems. Then, you will solve rational equations and decompose a fraction into partial fractions. You will also solve radical equations and inequalities using the same procedures you learned throughout this unit. Finally, you will use polynomial functions to solve real-world situations.

The Trigonometric Functions

In this unit, you will explore trigonometric functions. You will review angle and degree measure concepts as well as how to calculate the values for the trigonometric ratios using a right triangle. You will find the values of the six trigonometric rations using the unit circle. Then, you will apply your knowledge of trigonometry to determine inverse trigonometric functions, to find missing angle and side measures, and to solve right triangles. Finally, you will explore and solve problems using the Law of Sines and the Law of Cosines.

Graphs of Trigonometric Functions

In this unit, you will continue your study of trigonometry by examining graphs of trigonometric functions. You will review angle and radian measure concepts including radian and degree measure, arc length, and area of a sector. You will explore linear and angular velocity. Then, you will examine the graphs for the sine and cosine functions. In addition, you will learn how to calculate the amplitude and period as well as translate the graphs for the sine and cosine functions. Finally, you will graph other trigonometric functions including secant, cosecant, tangent, and cotangent functions as well as graph inverse trigonometric functions.

Trigonometric Identities and Equations

In this unit, you will identify trigonometric identities and solve trigonometric equations. You will explore reciprocal, quotient, Pythagorean, symmetry, and opposite-angle trigonometric identities and use them to verify other trigonometric identities. Then, you will learn and solve trigonometric equations and inequalities using the sum, difference, double-angle, and half-angle identities. Finally, you will learn how to write a linear equation in normal form and find the distance from a point to a line.

Precalculus A Final

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Advanced Mathematical Concepts

Textbook

  • ¥ Glencoe Advanced Mathematical Concepts †

Precalculus B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Precalculus A

Description:
The second course in Precalculus examines vectors and parametric equations, complex numbers, and exponential and logarithmic functions. The final unit introduces students to the fundamentals of calculus. Mathematical reasoning and problem solving skills are stressed as students prepare for future high school or college coursework in calculus.

Units:

Vectors and Parametric Equations

In this unit, you will review previously learned mathematical principles and extend prior mathematical knowledge. Concepts emphasized in this unit will reappear throughout the course, so take the time to complete each lesson carefully.As you work through the unit, you will be introduced to vectors and parametric equations. You will explore vector notation, including terms such as magnitude, direction, and resultant. You will learn how to add, subtract, and multiply vectors algebraically and geometrically. Then, you will determine if two vectors are perpendicular by finding their cross product. You will write, solve, and graph two-dimensional and three-dimensional vector and parametric equation problems. Finally, you will use your knowledge of vectors to solve real-world applications involving vectors.

Polar Coordinates and Complex Numbers

In this unit, you will expand your knowledge of complex numbers and be introduced to polar coordinates. You will continue your study of polar coordinates by graphing polar equations, converting polar and rectangular coordinates, and writing the polar form of a linear equation. Then, you will learn how to add, subtract, multiply, and divide complex numbers in rectangular form as well as multiply and divide complex numbers in polar form. Finally, you will use De Moivre’s Theorem to calculate the powers and roots of complex numbers.

Conics

In this unit, you will review and expand your knowledge of geometry. You will review how to find the distance and midpoint using a coordinate plane and prove geometric relationships. Then, you will use algebra to write and graph the standard and general form of an equation for circles, ellipses, hyperbolas, and parabolas. You will explore rectangular and parametric forms of conic sections. You will identify the discriminant and graph conic transformations. Finally, you will solve systems of second-degree equations and inequalities.

Exponential and Logarithmic Functions

In this unit, you will explore exponential and logarithmic functions. You will evaluate and simplify rational exponent expressions and equations, graph exponential equations and functions, and solve exponential growth and decay problems using the number e. Then, you will solve equations and inequalities involving common and natural logarithms. Finally, you will model real-world situations with exponential and logarithmic functions.

Sequences and Series

In this unit, you will continue your study of sequences and series. You will identify and use formulas to generate mathematical patterns, arithmetic sequences, and geometric sequences. You will explore limits and use them to evaluate infinite arithmetic and geometric sequences and series. Then, you will analyze a series to determine if it convergent or divergent. You will write a series in sigma notation using the nth term. You will learn the Binomial Theorem and use it to solve special sequences and series. Finally, you will solve and graph functions using iteration and prove conjectures using mathematical induction.

Combinatorics and Probability

In this unit, you will extend your knowledge of probability. You will review the Counting Principle, independent and dependent events, permutations, and combinations. You will explore permutations with repetitions and circular combinations. Then, you will solve problems that involve the probability of an event, odds, probability of a compound event, and conditional probability. Finally, you will find the probability of an event using the Binomial Theorem.

Statistics and Data Analysis

In this unit, you will explore statistics and data analysis methods. You will draw and interpret data using bar graphs, line plots, back-to-back bar graphs, three-dimensional bar graphs, and histograms. You will calculate measures of central tendency for a set of data. Then, you will analyze data using measures of variability including range, quartiles, interquartile range, semi-interquartile range, mean deviation, and standard deviation. You will explore normal distributions. Finally, you will determine the standard error of the mean and level of confidence for a sample set of data.

Precalculus B Final

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Advanced Mathematical Concepts

Textbook

  • ¥ Glencoe Advanced Mathematical Concepts †

Statistics A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of HS level algebra.

Description:
In this course, the student will become familiar with the vocabulary, method, and meaning in the statistics, which exist in the world around them. This is an applied course in which students actively construct their own understanding of the methods, interpretation, communication, and application of statistics. Each unit is framed by enduring understandings and essential questions designed to allow students a deep understanding of the concepts at hand rather than memorization and emulation. The TI-83+/84 OR 89 calculator and computers will be used to explore the world of data and the patterns which can be found by analyzing this information as well as statistical relationships. General topics of study include exploring data, planning and design of a study, and anticipating patterns.

Units:

Univariate Data and Graphical Displays: Part 1

This unit begins with an introduction to univariate data, beginning with a video that covers the basics of statistics using real-world examples. Next, you will learn about different kinds of data, such as qualitative and quantitative. Different ways to display data is introduced, such as bar charts, pie graphs, plots, and histograms. You will begin to learn about data distribution in regards to center, shape, and spread. Then you will have the opportunity to practice displaying data using different methods, including using an interactive histogram. Finally, you will review and use all the information introduced in this unit prior to taking the unit test.

Univariate Data and Graphical Displays: Part 2

In this unit, you will continue the process of describing distributions by using quantities to describe the data set. Specifically, you will learn how to describe the center using the mean or the median and the spread using the range, quartiles, variance, and standard deviation. You will learn how this information contributes to the five-number summary and how to display this information in a boxplot. You will also learn about Tukey’s Rule which can be used to determine if a data point is an outlier.

Introduction to Bivariate and Categorical Data

This unit provides an introduction to bivariate data beginning with classifying and identifying different types of variables, such as explanatory and response variables. You will then learn how to plot bivariate data using a scatterplot to determine if there is a relationship between the two variables. Interpreting scatterplots involves identifying and describing associations such as direction, form and strength and identifying any data points that do not seem to follow the pattern, called outliers. You will learn about correlation, such as how to calculate and interpret, and the difference between correlation and causation. Using a scatterplot, you will learn how data can be modeled with a least squares regression line and use this model to make predictions. Regressions will be evaluated through the use of residuals, as well as influential points and coefficient of determination.

Exploring Bivariate and Non-linear Data

In this unit, you will continue working with modeling and interpreting bivariate data. However, the focus will be on data in which linear regression is not the best model. You will learn about exponential data and the power function and how these can be used to model and interpret bivariate data. You will also get an opportunity to analyze bivariate data that is categorical rather than quantitative. Other concepts will include Simpson’s Paradox, lurking variables, causation, and extrapolation.

Conducting Studies – Samples and Surveys

This unit introduces how reliable data can be obtained for studies, experiments, and simulations. You will learn how a sample can be used to represent a population and how to identify bias, including its affect on any conclusions drawn from the collection of data. Opportunities are provided for you to design samples and surveys, including how randomization should be used in order to obtain reliable data. You will also learn about the different types of good sampling methods that should be used to obtain reliable data as well as sampling cautions that can contribute to sampling error.

Semester Review and Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to review and pull together all the information introduced in the first semester of the course in order to prepare for the semester exam.

Statistics B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of HS level algebra.

Description:
In this course, the student will become familiar with the vocabulary, method, and meaning in the statistics, which exist in the world around them. This is an applied course in which students actively construct their own understanding of the methods, interpretation, communication, and application of statistics. Each unit is framed by enduring understandings and essential questions designed to allow students a deep understanding of the concepts at hand rather than memorization and emulation. The TI-83+/84 OR 89 calculator and computers will be used to explore the world of data and the patterns which can be found by analyzing this information as well as statistical relationships. General topics of study include exploring data, planning and design of a study, and anticipating patterns.

Units:

Conducting Experiments

In this unit, you will learn about experiments and what information you can expect to obtain. Terminology related to experiments such as experimental units, treatments, factors, and levels are explained. You will learn about the different kinds of experiments and experimental designs. Experimental cautions are explained as well as how to conduct a simulation. The concept of generalizability, making generalizations about a population, is covered as well as how to control for variables that you know will affect the results, such as blocking.

Probability

In this unit, you will learn the meaning of probability and how to calculate probability. You will use various methods for finding probability based on the circumstances, such as using the counting principle, the multiplication principle, and the addition rule. You will learn how working with and without replacement affects probability. Concepts such as disjoint events, independence and conditional probability are explained as well as how Venn diagrams and tree diagrams can be used to determine probability.

Random Variables

In this unit you will learn about random variables, such as discrete random variables and continuous random variables, including notation convention and probability distributions related to each. You will also learn how to calculate expected values and determine if a game is fair using mean, standard deviation, and variance.

Binomial and Geometric Distributions

In this unit you will learn that certain events can be described and predicted using binomial and geometric models. The criteria for each model is introduced as well as how to find the probabilities of each using mean, standard deviation, and formulas.

Sampling Distributions

This unit explores sampling distributions which provide descriptive measurements, such as mean, median, and standard deviation of a sample. You will learn how sampling statistics relate to the population through the Central Limit Theorem, normal approximations, and sample proportions and means.

Semester Review and Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to review and pull together all the information introduced in the second semester of the course in order to prepare for the semester exam.

AP Biology A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Algebra 1, Biology, and Chemistry

Description:
AP Biology A is taught at the same level as a first-year college biology class. In this course, the student will develop a framework for biology and gain a deeper understanding of science as a process. Some of the major themes throughout this course include organic molecules and free energy changes, prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, cellular energetics, heredity, and molecular genetics.

This course adheres closely to the College Board standards for AP Biology and will prepare the student to take the AP Biology Exam.

AP Biology B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of AP Biology A

Description:
AP Biology B is taught at the same level as a first-year college biology class. In this course, the student will develop a framework for biology and gain a deeper understanding of science as a process. Some of the major themes throughout this course include diversity of organisms, the structure and function of plants and animals, population dynamics, and global issues with ecology.  This course adheres closely to the College Board standards for AP Biology and will prepare the student to take the AP Biology Exam.

AP Environmental Science A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of two years of laboratory sciences and Algebra

Description:
The goal of AP Environmental Science is to provide the student with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world and to identify and analyze environmental problems that are natural and made my humans. The student will evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems and examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing problems. Laboratory experiments support student content mastery in both hands-on and virtual experiences.

Units:

Environmental Problems

Unit 1 provides you with an overview of environmental issues. You will experience the interdisciplinary nature of the course, with lessons on politics, economics, and history. Unit 1 is challenging, especially if you are new to AP courses. It is one of the longer units, with both lab and field work components. Working closely during this unit, providing help resources through pro-active feedforward, and lots of encouraging feedback is the best practice to insure your success. Unit 1 also introduces the semester 1 collaborative project.

The Living World

In Unit 2, you will investigate the components of the living world: species, populations, symbiotic relationships like predator-prey, food webs, and the energy involved in the living systems. This unit draws on your previous knowledge from your Biology courses. Biogeochemical cycles and biodiversity are included in this unit.

The Physical World

In Unit 3, the physical world is the focus. Climate, biomes, ocean circulation, and the structure of the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere are included in this unit.

Population

In Unit 4, Population, you are introduced to population dynamics, demographics, and urbanization. Although this unit appears short with five lessons, it is important to your success on the AP Exam and includes math skills that will be tested.

Energy

Unit 5 is a very important unit that introduces all types of energy: energy units of measurement, calculations and conversions, fossil fuels, nuclear power, and alternative energy sources. A great deal of information is included in this unit and it is one of the longer parts of the course. This unit is also the end of the first semester of the course, so the semester 1 final exam occurs at the end of unit 5. The collaboration project for the first semester is due in this unit.

AP Environmental Science B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Environmental Science A

Description:
The goal of AP Environmental Science is to provide the student with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world and to identify and analyze environmental problems that are natural and made by humans. The student will evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems and examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing problems. Laboratory expermients support student content mastery in both hands-on and virtual experiences.

Units:

Atmosphere & Climate Change

Unit 1 deals with the atmosphere and climate change. It is the beginning of semester 2 and the semester 2 collaborative assessment is introduced. Topics discussed in this unit include the atmosphere, air pollution, global climate change, acid deposition and ozone layer thinning.

Land and Food

Soil, soil pollution, agriculture, pesticides and land conservation are the main topics of Unit 2. The unit is intensely hands-on, with four of the five lessons requiring active participation in the form of labs, model construction or surveying family and friends.

Water

Unit 3 is all about water: water pollution, water supply, and water quality. Although the unit is shorter than others, the lessons are critically important to the AP Exam.

Toxicology & Risk

Toxicology is the topic of this unit. Human health and risk are also important topics included here.

Recycling and Sustainability

Unit 5 is the last unit in the course. The semester 2 final exam is included in Unit 5 and the semester 2 collaborative assessment is due in this unit. Topics described in this unit are solid waste, hazardous waste, and recycling. The final lesson of the course emphasizes the theme of sustainability, which has been woven throughout the course.

AP Physics B A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Trigonometry and PreCalculus

Description:
Physics is the science of matter and energy—how the universe is put together. AP Physics A and B are non-calculus survey courses covering five general areas: Newtonian mechanics, thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, waves and optics, and atomic and nuclear physics. In AP Physics A, the student will be introduced to physics and will concentrate on Newtonian mechanics, fluid mechanics, and thermal physics. The student will get an understanding of the core principles involved and learn to apply these principles in the solution of problems.

Units:

Prerequisities

This unit will review the skills that you will have to master in order to be successful in AP Physics B. You will review measurement, systems of equations, the Pythagorean theorem, and other algebra and geometry concepts.

Kinematics

Have you ever wondered how a batter times his swing so that he hits a baseball out of the park? Or have you tossed a ball up to the ceiling just to see if the ball will “barely” touch it before it returns to the ground. This unit will deal with motion in one and two dimensions that scientists term kinematics. In kinematics, you will learn how to qualitatively and quantitatively describe motion. You will also learn how fast you need to toss that ball to just barely reach the ceiling.

Newton’s Laws of Motion

Why does an object move? What makes an object at rest begin to move? What causes an object to accelerate or decelerate? For each question, you can answer that a force is required. In this unit, you will investigate the connection between force and motion. This is known as dynamics,

You’ll begin the discussion of dynamics by talking briefly about force, then you’ll move into Newton’s Laws of Motion and how to apply the mathematical models of Newton’s Laws to problem solving.

Work, Energy, Power and Momentum

You know from your studies of Newton’s laws that if two vehicles collide the forces involved are equal—meaning even if the two vehicles are largely different in mass, they will exert the same amount of force on each other. So, why does the smaller vehicle usually have more damage?

In this unit, you’ll explore the concepts of work, energy, power, and momentum to help you answer that question.

Circular, Rotational and Gravitational Motion

How does a car stay on a curved road without running off? Why do you feel forces when the car goes around a curve? Why do astronauts feel weightless in space? What keeps a satellite from falling out of the sky? You’ll find answers to all these questions and more as you move through the Circular, Rotational, and Gravitational Motion Unit.

Fluid Mechanics

In previous units, you learned about objects moving, bouncing off each other, deforming or not. You often treated all objects as points. Now, you will shift your thinking a bit to substances that are very deformable—fluids. Hopefully, you already know that liquids and gases are fluids.

You will learn about fluids at rest (statics) and fluids in motion (dynamics). You’ll also learn how to answer many questions like “Why do humans float?”, “How does floating compare to sinking?”, and “Why does a boat made of metal float, but a block of metal won’t?”

Thermal Physics

Heating the air inside a “hot-air” balloon raises the air’s temperature, causing it to expand and force air out the opening at the bottom. The reduced amount of gas inside means its density is lower, so there is a net buoyant force upward on the balloon.In this unit, you will learn about heat, temperature, thermal expansion, the gas laws, and the laws of thermodynamics. All of these work together to make the hot-air balloon ride successful.

Semester 1 Exam

Kit

  • ¥ AP Physics Kit

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Principles with Applications, 6th Edition

Supplies

  • ¥ Batteries AA
  • ¥ Battery holder
  • ¥ Concave Mirror
  • ¥ Conductor 2 Snaps
  • ¥ Conductor 3 Snaps
  • ¥ Convex Mirror
  • ¥ Cup, styrofoam
  • ¥ Fishing line (1 ft)
  • ¥ Hanging Mass Set
  • ¥ Laser Pointer
  • ¥ LED green
  • ¥ LED red
  • ¥ Marbles
  • ¥ Metal Washers
  • ¥ Mini Base Grid
  • ¥ Refraction Cell
  • ¥ Resistor 1 K
  • ¥ Ruler
  • ¥ Ruler with groove
  • ¥ Salt 1 T.
  • ¥ Single Snap
  • ¥ Snap Jumper Wire Black
  • ¥ Snap Jumper Wire Red
  • ¥ Spring
  • ¥ Spring scale
  • ¥ Stopwatch
  • ¥ Switch Slide
  • ¥ Tube, Aluminum or Plastic

Textbook

  • ¥ AP Physics: Principles with Applications, 6th Ed †

AP Physics B B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of AP Physics B A

Description:
Physics is the science of matter and energy—how the universe is put together. AP Physics A and B are non-calculus survey courses covering five general areas: Newtonian mechanics, thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, waves and optics, and atomic and nuclear physics. In AP Physics A, the student will be introduced to physics and will concentrate on Newtonian mechanics, fluid mechanics, and thermal physics. The student will get an understanding of the core principles involved and learn to apply these principles in the solution of problems. This course is two semesters.

Units:

Electrostatics

In this unit, you will be introduced to the properties of electrical charges including the magnitude and direction of electrical fields created by differences in electrical potential. You will also study the electrostatic mechanisms of conductors, insulators, and capacitors, and you will use your knowledge to calculate the electrical potential of various conducting objects.

Electric Current

In this unit, you will learn the basics of electrical current by analyzing and interpreting circuit diagrams. Specifically, you will use Ohm’s Law and Kirchhoff’s rules to calculate current, resistance, voltage, capacitance, and power dissipation in simple and complex circuits.

Magnetism

In this unit, you will be introduced to the properties of magnetism, including the movement of particles within magnetic fields. You will also calculate the current and flux within a magnetic field as well as determine the size of magnetic forces and current-carrying wires using Faraday’s and Lenz’s laws.

Vibrations and Waves

In this unit, you will be introduced to the motions and properties of different vibrations and waves. You will begin to understand simple harmonic motion as it relates to pendulums and describe wave motion and sound waves in terms of their definitive properties.

Optics

In this unit, you will learn the specifics of different optical properties. You will be introduced to the parts of the electromagnetic spectrum and will be able to use the laws of reflection and refraction to reason the differences of several mirror images. You will also understand the characteristics of images through lenses by analyzing the properties of beams of light.

Modern Physics

In this unit, you will be introduced to the most recent physical science theories. Specifically, you will learn about photoelectric effect, modern wave particle theories, as well as atomic energy levels and spectra. Recent models of the atom as well as information about radioactive decay and nuclear manipulation will provide insight into modern physical science developments.

AP Physics B B Exam

Demonstrate the knowledge you have obtained in this course by preparing for and completing the AP Physics BB exam and the physics portfolio assessment.

Kit

  • ¥ AP Physics Kit

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Principles with Applications, 6th Edition

Supplies

  • ¥ Batteries AA
  • ¥ Battery holder
  • ¥ Concave Mirror
  • ¥ Conductor 2 Snaps
  • ¥ Conductor 3 Snaps
  • ¥ Convex Mirror
  • ¥ Cup, styrofoam
  • ¥ Fishing line (1 ft)
  • ¥ Hanging Mass Set
  • ¥ Laser Pointer
  • ¥ LED green
  • ¥ LED red
  • ¥ Marbles
  • ¥ Metal Washers
  • ¥ Mini Base Grid
  • ¥ Refraction Cell
  • ¥ Resistor 1 K
  • ¥ Ruler
  • ¥ Ruler with groove
  • ¥ Salt 1 T.
  • ¥ Single Snap
  • ¥ Snap Jumper Wire Black
  • ¥ Snap Jumper Wire Red
  • ¥ Spring
  • ¥ Spring scale
  • ¥ Stopwatch
  • ¥ Switch Slide
  • ¥ Tube, Aluminum or Plastic

Textbook

  • ¥ AP Physics: Principles with Applications, 6th Ed †

Biology A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
In this course, the student will study the science of life. The student will explore the idea that living things are extremely diverse in form, yet are unified by certain core characteristics that they all share. In learning about these core characteristics, the student will be able to critically evaluate data and information related to biological problems, connect many ideas to the student’s own life, and see the world in a new way.

Units:

The Nature of Life

In this unit, you will begin by considering the fundamental nature of science and the role it plays in the study of biology. You will lay a foundation for the remainder of the course by exploring the unifying factors that are common to all living things.

Ecology

In this unit, you will study the environmental factors, both living and nonliving, that affect the survival of organisms. You will learn how matter and energy move within and between ecosystems, creating networks and linkages that connect all organisms on Earth. You will complete a unit portfolio assessment in which you will design, run, and evaluate experiments to test the effects of fertilizer on algae growth.

Cells

In this unit, you will focus on the cell as the smallest unit of life. You will investigate cell size, structure, and organization, and link these characteristics to the many functions that the cell performs. As a unit portfolio assessment, you will carry out a lab exercise to study the effect of cell size on diffusion of materials into the cell.

Genetics

In this unit, you will learn how biological information is encoded and passed from an organism to its offspring. You will begin with the work of Gregor Mendel to understand the basis for the patterns of inheritance that can be observed any time the features of parents and their young are compared. You will move on to develop an understanding of the basic unit of biological information, the gene, as a sequence of DNA. As part of this unit, you will complete a portfolio assessment in which you will make and present a model to describe the process of meiosis.

Unit Test

Biology B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
In this course, the student will study the science of life. The student will explore the idea that living things are extremely diverse in form, yet are unified by certain core characteristics that they all share. In learning about these core characteristics, the student will be able to critically evaluate data and information related to biological problems, connect many ideas to the student’s own life, and see the world in a new way.

Units:

Evolution

In this unit, you will consider the observations Charles Darwin made that led him to propose his theory of evolution. You will explore the range of diversity of living organisms as well as the methods biologists use to classify them, which are rooted in evolutionary theory. As a portfolio assessment, you will develop a dichotomous key for identifying a group of organisms in your local area.

From Microorganisms to Plants

In this unit, you will explore the structure, function, reproduction, and evolution of viruses and the organisms in the kingdoms of Eubacteria, Archaebacteria, “Protista,” Fungi, and Plantae. You will discover the ways in which plants respond to their environments and why they do so. You will research and prepare a presentation about an organism that causes human disease as a portfolio assessment.

Animals

In this unit, you will explore the evolution and diversity of the animal kingdom. You will discover how scientists classify animals, how their body systems work together to maintain homeostasis, and how animal behavior affects their survival. You will research and prepare a presentation explaining how animal body structures are related to their function and as a portfolio assignment, you will explore some trends in animal evolution.

Chemistry A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
Chemistry A is the first of two comprehensive courses incorporating math support and problem-solving along side the chemistry curriculum. The first course provides a foundation in elemental chemistry; students explore the atoms and elements, concepts in chemical bonding, and how atoms and elements react to one another.

Units:

Introduction to Chemistry

Chemistry can help explain much of what is happening in the world around you. This branch of science is vast because it deals with the study of matter, which is present just about everywhere. In this introductory unit, you will study the different areas of chemistry, identify how chemistry affects various industries, review the steps of the scientific method, and examine the measurement system that all scientists use. You will also learn how to measure, convert, and calculate accurately to solve chemistry problems. You will repeatedly apply these math concepts throughout the course.

An Overview of Matter and Change

Chemistry is the study of matter and the changes it undergoes. In this unit you will begin to examine the basic types of matter and the factors that may alter it. You will learn how to classify matter, review the chemical naming system of elements, describe the physical and chemical properties of different substances, and analyze chemical and physical changes of matter. You will further explore some of these concepts later in the course.

Atoms and Elements

In order to understand the composition of matter, you need to understand the structure of an atom, the smallest particle of an element that has all the characteristics of that element. In this unit you will study the composition of atoms and elements. You will examine various historic models of the atom, learn how to write an electron configuration for an atom, compare atoms of different elements, and learn how an atom becomes an ion. In addition, you will review how elements are organized in the periodic table and analyze trends in the table.

Chemical Bonding

Atoms and molecules constantly combine to form new substances. In this unit you will learn how different types of chemical bonding occur. You will examine how atoms become charged ions; compare ionic, metallic, and covalent bonds; model how atoms combine; describe the properties of different types of compounds; and evaluate the strength of bonds. It is important that you to understand how chemical bonding occurs before you study chemical reactions.

Chemical Formulas and Reactions

In order to understand many core chemistry concepts, you must be able represent and analyze chemical reactions. In this unit you will practice doing so as you apply rules for naming and writing chemical formulas, balance equations, compare and interpret empirical and molecular formulas, and predict the products of different types of reactions. In addition, you will learn how to convert one quantity of a substance, such as mass or volume, to another, such as moles or number of particles, and calculate percent composition of a compound.

Stoichiometry

In order to thoroughly understand chemical equations, you need to be able to mathematically interpret them. In this unit you will apply math concepts in order to analyze chemical equations in terms of moles, particles, mass, and volume. You will also learn how to calculate the maximum amount of product that reaction can produce.

Final Review and Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. The final exam may include any material that has been presented throughout the semester. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes and answers to questions in your Science journal before you begin to review.

CD/DVD

  • ¥ Virtual CHEMLab

Course Sets

  • ¥ Chemistry (Standard, Honors)

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Prentice Hall Chemistry

Chemistry B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
Visual learning and hands-on exercises help reinforce the concepts covered in Chemistry B, which include the properties of matter, solutions, and energy. Students are also introduced to the principles of electrochemistry, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry.

Units:

Solids, Liquids, and Gases

In this unit you will analyze the states of matter in terms of particles and use the kinetic theory of matter to describe the behavior of matter in each state. You will predict how temperature, volume, and the number of particles affect gas pressure, and how to quantify these effects using Boyle’s, Charles’s, and the combined gas laws. You will have the opportunity to perform a virtual lab to investigate the relationship between the pressure and volume of a gas. Finally, you will learn how solutions form and compare different types of solutions.

Solutions, Acids, and Bases

In this unit you will continue to learn about different types of solutions as you examine some special properties of solutions and solve problems involving solubility and concentration. You will explore acids and bases as you compare acid-base theories, calculate acid and base concentrations, and describe what happens during neutralization reactions. You will have the opportunity to perform a virtual and a hands-on titration lab at the end of the unit.

Heat, Energy, and Reactions

In this unit you will continue to explore chemical reactions in terms of heat and energy as you learn how scientists measure the heat of a reaction and solve problems involving heat transfers in chemical reactions. You will identify factors that affect the rate of a reaction and design an experiment to test these factors. Finally, you will learn how amounts of reactants and products change in a chemical system at equilibrium and identify stresses that can change the equilibrium of a chemical reaction.

Electrochemistry

In this unit you will study electrochemistry, the branch of chemistry that deals with the relationship between electricity and chemical changes. You will examine how reactants and products gain and lose electrons, learn how to determine the oxidation number of an atom, and compare different types of electrochemical cells, which convert electrical energy into chemical energy or vice versa. In addition, you will have the opportunity to perform a virtual redox titration.

Organic Chemistry

Many everyday items, such as clothes, food, and containers, are carbon-based, or organic compounds. Throughout this unit you will classify organic compounds, model their structures, examine how they form, and identify the organic compounds that certain common products contain. In addition, you will learn about the roles that carbon plays in biochemical processes.

Nuclear Chemistry

Although nuclear materials are fairly common, most people do not know exactly what they are or what makes them both beneficial and dangerous. In this unit, you will explore different types and uses of radioactivity and analyze the various changes that nuclear particles may undergo. Also, you will learn how nuclear waste is stored and how scientists detect radiation.

Final Review and Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. The final exam may include any material that has been presented throughout the semester. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes and answers to questions in your Science journal before you begin to review.

CD/DVD

  • ¥ Virtual CHEMLab

Course Sets

  • ¥ Chemistry (Standard, Honors)

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Prentice Hall Chemistry

Earth Science A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the first of two courses that comprise Earth Science. This course is designed to prepare the student to confidently enter and complete college-level Earth science courses. The Prentice Hall text, Earth Science, provides the basis for the course content.

This course consists of varied curriculum that provides the student the opportunity to explore, compare, research, reflect, and make real-world connections. The student will engage in hands-on explorations and virtual simulations, which will enhance traditional lesson formats.

During this course, the student will identify the branches of Earth science, locate geographic features on topographic maps, conduct hands-on experiments with minerals and rocks, compare and contrast weathering and erosion, explore plate tectonics with relation to earthquakes and volcanoes, and investigate the formation of mountains.

Units:

Introduction to Earth Science

Earth Science is a vast branch of science that covers many subject areas, including geology, oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy. Earth scientists study physical and chemical aspects of Earth and its place in the solar system, using various mapping techniques and advanced global positioning technology. Because Earth contains so many interactive parts, scientists often study Earth as a system. The Earth system is powered by energy from the sun and by geologic forces inside Earth.

In this introductory unit, you will learn about Earth’s composition and internal structure. You will read about different techniques that scientists use to study Earth and other planets in the solar system and you will learn how the theory of plate tectonics influences the field of Earth science. You will explore Earth’s four major spheres—the geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere—and you will determine how human activity impacts the Earth system.

Minerals

Did you know that close to 4,000 different minerals have been identified on Earth? When scientists discover a new mineral, they study its physical characteristics and try to determine how it may have formed. Once a mineral has been named, it can be grouped with other minerals that share similar properties.

In this unit, you will examine some of the more common mineral groups on Earth, including silicates, carbonates, oxides, sulfates, sulfides, halides, and native elements. You will learn about mineral properties and the tests that scientists conduct to classify minerals. You will also study elements, atoms, and subatomic particles, and you will learn how atoms of different elements combine to form compounds.

Rocks

When different minerals mix together, they form rocks. There are three main types of rocks on Earth—igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic—each of which forms in a unique way. Rocks can change from one type to another because of the rock cycle, which you will learn about, and the constant changes within Earth’s interior.

In this unit, you will study each rock type in great detail. You will learn how each one forms and where scientists usually find that type of rock on Earth. You will explore the rock cycle and the natural processes that influence rock transformations. At the end of the unit, you will conduct an investigation using various samples from your rock kit.

Earth’s Resources

Earth contains valuable resources—such as air and water—that are used every day by plants, animals, and humans. These resources are categorized into two main groups: renewable resources and nonrenewable resources. Since there are limited amounts of nonrenewable resources on Earth, scientists have determined alternative ways to extract energy from resources such as wind, water, and the sun.

In this unit, you will explore different forms of renewable and nonrenewable resources. You will read about fossil fuels and the ways they are used to produce energy for various human activities. You will identify alternative energy resources and their advantages and disadvantages, and you will explore how Earth’s natural resources can be protected from harmful pollutants and overuse.

Sculpturing Earth’s Surface

Geologically, Earth is constantly changing. Earth’s surface is influenced by internal forces that create mountains and external forces that weather and erode Earth’s crust. Some geologic changes occur over long periods of time, while others happen quickly, drastically changing landscapes in minutes.

In this unit, you will study processes that sculpt Earth’s surface, including weathering, erosion, deposition, and even human activities such as logging and construction. You will learn how and why mass movements occur, and you will explore the various ways water can shape landscapes over time.

Glaciers, Deserts, and Wind

Glaciers cover and shape approximately 10 percent of the total land area on Earth. As a glacier moves—or flows—it erodes rock from valley floors and walls. In sharp contrast, deserts are areas that lack moisture and have very little organic material. Desert ecosystems are easily shaped by running water and wind.

In this unit, you will learn about glaciers and deserts. You will study different types of glaciers and how they move, and you will read how sand- and pebble-covered deserts are affected by the processes of weathering and erosion. At the end of the unit, you will take a closer look at exactly how wind erodes desert landscapes.

Earthquakes and Earth’s Interior

Caused by the rapid release of energy stored inside Earth, earthquakes can greatly damage Earth’s surface, particularly if they occur near a large city. Earthquakes can create various hazards, including seismic shaking, landslides, and even tsunamis.

In this unit, you will explore earthquakes and why they occur. By completing the lab Locating an Earthquake you will learn how scientists are able to determine an earthquake’s epicenter and its focus. In order to understand how scientists measure earthquakes, you will study two types of seismic waves: body waves and surface waves.

Plate Tectonics and Other Igneous Activity

The hypothesis of continental drift, followed by the theory of plate tectonics, significantly changed scientists’ understanding of Earth’s geologic forces. As scientists began to accept new ideas about movement within Earth’s layers, they were able to explain many other geologic forces, such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and even seafloor spreading.

In this unit, you will explore the theory of plate tectonics and how it impacted the field of geology. You will learn what causes tectonic plate motion and you will examine different types of plate boundaries. During the unit, you will read how volcanic eruptions are directly related to activity within Earth’s interior. You will learn about different types of volcanism and you will study the three main types of volcanoes: shield, cinder cone, and composite cone.

Mountain Building

Mountains are classified into four main types: volcanic, folded, fault-block, and dome. These types of mountains can be found in various places on Earth’s surface. The mountain-building process occurs mostly at convergent plate boundaries, where colliding plates result in massive forces that create mountains.

In this unit, you will explore how and where mountains are built on Earth’s surface. You will identify the four main types of mountains and at which convergent plate boundary they usually occur. During the unit, you will complete an investigation of anticlines and synclines, which will help you better understand the different types of folded mountains.

Final Review and Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. The final exam may include any material that has been presented throughout the semester. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes and answers to questions in your science journal before you begin to review.

CD/DVD

  • ¥ Prentice Hall Virtual Earth Science CD

Course Sets

  • ¥ Earth Science (Basic, Standard, Honors)

Kit

  • ¥ Science Kit – Earth Science

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Prentice Hall Earth Science

Supplies

  • ¥ Goggles, safety
  • ¥ Thermometers (2)

Earth Science B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the second of two courses that comprise Earth Science. This course is designed to prepare the student to confidently enter and complete college-level Earth science courses. The Prentice Hall text, Earth Science, provides the basis for the course content.

This course consists of varied curriculum that provides the student the opportunity to explore, compare, research, reflect, and make real-world connections. The student will engage in hands-on explorations and virtual simulations, which will enhance traditional lesson formats.

During this course, the student will explore Earth’s history by studying fossils and rock layers; investigate oceanic productivity and features on the sea floor; learn about atmospheric processes, including the water cycle; infer how severe storms form; study the Earth-moon-sun relationship; and explore other celestial bodies, such as stars.

Units:

Geologic Time and Earth’s History

In this introductory unit, you will explore Earth’s early history by studying fossils, the rock record, and the geologic time scale. You will learn how scientists are able to date rock layers using radiometric dating, and how they are able to develop theories of past environments using fossils. In addition, you will learn how the geologic time scale is organized and how it was originally developed by scientists in the 1800s.

During this unit, you will complete a lab on fossils, which will enable you to understand how fossils can be used to define rock sequences. At the end of the unit, you will study Precambrian Time and the Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic Eras. You will learn how Earth changed biologically and geologically during these important time periods in history.

Oceanography

In this unit, your reading assignments and activity components will immerse you in the field of oceanography. From physical features of the ocean floor to ocean productivity and the diversity of marine life, you will find that you cover most aspects of the world’s oceans throughout this unit.

During this unit, you will study the density of seawater. You will be asked to complete a Virtual Lab in which you will experiment with different solids and liquids, to better understand density. At the end of the unit, you will learn about waves, tides, and how ocean waters circulate throughout the world. You will also learn about shoreline processes and how various features are created due to natural causes.

Meteorology: Part 1

In this unit, you will study various topics within the field of meteorology. You will learn how to differentiate between weather and climate, and you will compare and contrast heat and temperature. When studying heat, you will complete an investigation about the specific heat of land and water.

During this unit, you will also explore how clouds form. You will learn about the four processes that lift air—orographic lifting, frontal wedging, convergence, and localized convective lifting—and you will study how different types of precipitation form. At the end of the unit, you will study air pressure and wind. You will learn how air pressure is exerted on objects and how local and regional wind patterns form.

Meteorology: Part 2

In this unit, you will continue your study of meteorology. First you will learn about air masses and how they are classified. Then you will explore fronts, including: warm fronts, cold fronts, stationary fronts, and occluded fronts. You will also study severe storms and you will identify the conditions in which they form.

During this unit, you will explore global climates and the characteristics that define them. You will learn about some of the natural processes that can cause changes in climate, and you will study global warming. Upon completion of the unit, you will have a better understanding of the consequences of global warming and climate change.

Astronomy: Part 1

In this unit, you will begin to study outer space. You will first learn how early astronomers viewed Earth’s place in the solar system, and you will study famous contributors to early astronomy, such as Galileo and Newton. Next you will study the Earth-moon-sun system and you will identify different features on the surface of the moon.

During this unit, you will examine the solar system and its interrelated parts. You will learn about the terrestrial and Jovian planets, as well as other bodies such as asteroids, meteors, and comets. By the end of the lesson, you will be able to explain why Pluto is no longer considered one of the planets in our solar system.

Astronomy: Part 2

In this unit, you will study light and how it applies to the field of astronomy. You will examine the electromagnetic spectrum and you will learn how the Doppler effect can be used to study stars. You will also study the following types of telescopes: refracting, reflecting, radio, and space.

During this unit, you will investigate the orbital speed of the planets in our solar system. You will also learn about star properties and the birth, life, and death of stars. Finally, you will learn about the universe on a greater scale; you will discover that scientists believe in universal expansion and you will study the big bang theory.

Final Review and Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. The final exam may include any material that has been presented throughout the semester. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes and answers to questions in your science journal before you begin to review.

CD/DVD

  • ¥ Prentice Hall Virtual Earth Science CD

Course Sets

  • ¥ Earth Science (Basic, Standard, Honors)

Kit

  • ¥ Science Kit – Earth Science

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Prentice Hall Earth Science

Supplies

  • ¥ Goggles, safety
  • ¥ Thermometers (2)

Honors Biology A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
In this course, the student will study the science of life. The student will explore the idea that living things are extremely diverse in form, yet are unified by certain core characteristics that they all share. In learning about these core characteristics, the student will be able to critically evaluate data and information related to biological problems, connect many ideas to the student’s own life, and see the world in a new way. This Honors level course includes ample opportunities for the student to engage in open-ended extension activities and independent research and demonstrate critical thinking skills.

Units:

The Nature of Life

In this unit, you will begin by considering the fundamental nature of science and the role it plays in the study of biology. You will lay a foundation for the remainder of the course by exploring the unifying factors that are common to all living things.

Ecology

In this unit, you will study the environmental factors, both living and nonliving, that affect the survival of organisms. You will learn how matter and energy move within and between ecosystems, creating networks and linkages that connect all organisms on Earth. You will complete a unit portfolio assessment in which you will design, run, and evaluate experiments to test the effects of fertilizer on algae growth.

Honors Biology B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
In this course, the student will study the science of life. The student will explore the idea that living things are extremely diverse in form, yet are unified by certain core characteristics that they all share. In learning about these core characteristics, the student will be able to critically evaluate data and information related to biological problems, connect many ideas to the student’s own life, and see the world in a new way. This Honors level course includes ample opportunities for the student to engage in open-ended extension activities and independent research and demonstrate critical thinking skills.

Honors Chemistry A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
Honors Chemistry A is the first of two comprehensive courses incorporating math support and problem-solving along side the rigorous chemistry curriculum. The first course provides a foundation in elemental chemistry; students explore the atoms and elements, concepts in chemical bonding, and how atoms and elements react to one another. This Honors level course also includes greater opportunities for independent research and the demonstration of critical thinking skills.

Units:

Introduction to Chemistry

Chemistry can help explain much of what is happening in the world around you. This branch of science is vast because it deals with the study of matter, which is present just about everywhere. In this introductory unit, you will study the different areas of chemistry, identify how chemistry affects various industries, review the steps of the scientific method, and examine the measurement system that all scientists use. You will also learn how to measure, convert, and calculate accurately to solve chemistry problems. You will repeatedly apply these math concepts throughout the course.

An Overview of Matter and Change

Chemistry is the study of matter and the changes it undergoes. In this unit you will begin to examine the basic types of matter and the factors that may alter it. You will learn how to classify matter, review the chemical naming system of elements, describe the physical and chemical properties of different substances, and analyze chemical and physical changes of matter. You will further explore some of these concepts later in the course.

Atoms and Elements

In order to understand the composition of matter, you need to understand the structure of an atom, the smallest particle of an element that has all the characteristics of that element. In this unit you will study the composition of atoms and elements. You will examine various historic models of the atom, learn how to write an electron configuration for an atom, compare atoms of different elements, and learn how an atom becomes an ion. In addition, you will review how elements are organized in the periodic table and analyze trends in the table.

Chemical Bonding

Atoms and molecules constantly combine to form new substances. In this unit you will learn how different types of chemical bonding occur. You will examine how atoms become charged ions; compare ionic, metallic, and covalent bonds; model how atoms combine; describe the properties of different types of compounds; and evaluate the strength of bonds. It is important that you to understand how chemical bonding occurs before you study chemical reactions.

Chemical Formulas and Reactions

In order to understand many core chemistry concepts, you must be able represent and analyze chemical reactions. In this unit you will practice doing so as you apply rules for naming and writing chemical formulas, balance equations, compare and interpret empirical and molecular formulas, and predict the products of different types of reactions. In addition, you will learn how to convert one quantity of a substance, such as mass or volume, to another, such as moles or number of particles, and calculate percent composition of a compound.

Stoichiometry

In order to thoroughly understand chemical equations, you need to be able to mathematically interpret them. In this unit you will apply math concepts in order to analyze chemical equations in terms of moles, particles, mass, and volume. You will also learn how to calculate the maximum amount of product that reaction can produce.

Final Review and Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. The final exam may include any material that has been presented throughout the semester. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes and answers to questions in your Science journal before you begin to review.

CD/DVD

  • ¥ Virtual CHEMLab

Course Sets

  • ¥ Chemistry (Standard, Honors)

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Prentice Hall Chemistry

Honors Chemistry B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
Visual learning, hands-on exercises, and independent research help reinforce the concepts covered in Honors Chemistry B, which include the properties of matter, solutions, and energy. The more rigorous curriculum includes the exploration of concepts and principles in the fields of electrochemistry, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry.

Units:

Solids, Liquids, and Gases

In this unit you will analyze the states of matter in terms of particles and use the kinetic theory of matter to describe the behavior of matter in each state. You will predict how temperature, volume, and the number of particles affect gas pressure, and how to quantify these effects using Boyle’s, Charles’s, and the combined gas laws. You will have the opportunity to perform a virtual lab to investigate the relationship between the pressure and volume of a gas. Finally, you will learn how solutions form and compare different types of solutions.

Solutions, Acids, and Bases

In this unit you will continue to learn about different types of solutions as you examine some special properties of solutions and solve problems involving solubility and concentration. You will explore acids and bases as you compare acid-base theories, calculate acid and base concentrations, and describe what happens during neutralization reactions. You will have the opportunity to perform a virtual and a hands-on titration lab at the end of the unit.

Heat, Energy, and Reactions

In this unit you will continue to explore chemical reactions in terms of heat and energy as you learn how scientists measure the heat of a reaction and solve problems involving heat transfers in chemical reactions. You will identify factors that affect the rate of a reaction and design an experiment to test these factors. Finally, you will learn how amounts of reactants and products change in a chemical system at equilibrium and identify stresses that can change the equilibrium of a chemical reaction.

Electrochemistry

In this unit you will study electrochemistry, the branch of chemistry that deals with the relationship between electricity and chemical changes. You will examine how reactants and products gain and lose electrons, learn how to determine the oxidation number of an atom, and compare different types of electrochemical cells, which convert electrical energy into chemical energy or vice versa. In addition, you will have the opportunity to perform a virtual redox titration.

Organic Chemistry

Many everyday items, such as clothes, food, and containers, are carbon-based, or organic compounds. Throughout this unit you will classify organic compounds, model their structures, examine how they form, and identify the organic compounds that certain common products contain. In addition, you will learn about the roles that carbon plays in biochemical processes.

Nuclear Chemistry

Although nuclear materials are fairly common, most people do not know exactly what they are or what makes them both beneficial and dangerous. In this unit, you will explore different types and uses of radioactivity and analyze the various changes that nuclear particles may undergo. Also, you will learn how nuclear waste is stored and how scientists detect radiation.

Final Review and Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. The final exam may include any material that has been presented throughout the semester. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes and answers to questions in your Science journal before you begin to review.

CD/DVD

  • ¥ Virtual CHEMLab

Course Sets

  • ¥ Chemistry (Standard, Honors)

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Prentice Hall Chemistry

Honors Earth Science A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the first of two courses that comprise Honors Earth Science. This course is designed to prepare the student to confidently enter and complete advanced college-level Earth science courses. The Prentice Hall text, Earth Science, provides the basis for the course content. This course consists of rigorous curriculum that provides students the opportunity to deeply explore Earth science concepts and engage in independent research. The student will conduct hands-on explorations and virtual simulations, which will enhance traditional lesson formats.  During this course, the student will identify the branches of Earth science, locate geographic features on topographic maps, conduct hands-on experiments with minerals and rocks, compare and contrast weathering and erosion, explore plate tectonics with relation to earthquakes and volcanoes, and investigate the formation of mountains.

Units:

Introduction to Earth Science

Earth Science is a vast branch of science that covers many subject areas, including geology, oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy. Earth scientists study physical and chemical aspects of Earth and its place in the solar system, using various mapping techniques and advanced global positioning technology. Because Earth contains so many interactive parts, scientists often study Earth as a system. The Earth system is powered by energy from the sun and by geologic forces inside Earth.

In this introductory unit, you will learn about Earth’s composition and internal structure. You will read about different techniques that scientists use to study Earth and other planets in the solar system and you will learn how the theory of plate tectonics influences the field of Earth science. You will explore Earth’s four major spheres—the geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere—and you will determine how human activity impacts the Earth system.

Minerals

Did you know that close to 4,000 different minerals have been identified on Earth? When scientists discover a new mineral, they study its physical characteristics and try to determine how it may have formed. Once a mineral has been named, it can be grouped with other minerals that share similar properties.

In this unit, you will examine some of the more common mineral groups on Earth, including silicates, carbonates, oxides, sulfates, sulfides, halides, and native elements. You will learn about mineral properties and the tests that scientists conduct to classify minerals. You will also study elements, atoms, and subatomic particles, and you will learn how atoms of different elements combine to form compounds.

Rocks

When different minerals mix together, they form rocks. There are three main types of rocks on Earth—igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic—each of which forms in a unique way. Rocks can change from one type to another because of the rock cycle, which you will learn about, and the constant changes within Earth’s interior.

In this unit, you will study each rock type in great detail. You will learn how each one forms and where scientists usually find that type of rock on Earth. You will explore the rock cycle and the natural processes that influence rock transformations. At the end of the unit, you will conduct an investigation using various samples from your rock kit.

Earth’s Resources

Earth contains valuable resources—such as air and water—that are used every day by plants, animals, and humans. These resources are categorized into two main groups: renewable resources and nonrenewable resources. Since there are limited amounts of nonrenewable resources on Earth, scientists have determined alternative ways to extract energy from resources such as wind, water, and the sun.

In this unit, you will explore different forms of renewable and nonrenewable resources. You will read about fossil fuels and the ways they are used to produce energy for various human activities. You will identify alternative energy resources and their advantages and disadvantages, and you will explore how Earth’s natural resources can be protected from harmful pollutants and overuse.

Sculpturing Earth’s Surface

Geologically, Earth is constantly changing. Earth’s surface is influenced by internal forces that create mountains and external forces that weather and erode Earth’s crust. Some geologic changes occur over long periods of time, while others happen quickly, drastically changing landscapes in minutes.

In this unit, you will study processes that sculpt Earth’s surface, including weathering, erosion, deposition, and even human activities such as logging and construction. You will learn how and why mass movements occur, and you will explore the various ways water can shape landscapes over time.

Glaciers, Deserts, and Wind

Glaciers cover and shape approximately 10 percent of the total land area on Earth. As a glacier moves—or flows—it erodes rock from valley floors and walls. In sharp contrast, deserts are areas that lack moisture and have very little organic material. Desert ecosystems are easily shaped by running water and wind.

In this unit, you will learn about glaciers and deserts. You will study different types of glaciers and how they move, and you will read how sand- and pebble-covered deserts are affected by the processes of weathering and erosion. At the end of the unit, you will take a closer look at exactly how wind erodes desert landscapes.

Earthquakes and Earth’s Interior

Caused by the rapid release of energy stored inside Earth, earthquakes can greatly damage Earth’s surface, particularly if they occur near a large city. Earthquakes can create various hazards, including seismic shaking, landslides, and even tsunamis.

In this unit, you will explore earthquakes and why they occur. By completing the lab Locating an Earthquake you will learn how scientists are able to determine an earthquake’s epicenter and its focus. In order to understand how scientists measure earthquakes, you will study two types of seismic waves: body waves and surface waves.

Plate Tectonics and Other Igneous Activity

The hypothesis of continental drift, followed by the theory of plate tectonics, significantly changed scientists’ understanding of Earth’s geologic forces. As scientists began to accept new ideas about movement within Earth’s layers, they were able to explain many other geologic forces, such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and even seafloor spreading.

In this unit, you will explore the theory of plate tectonics and how it impacted the field of geology. You will learn what causes tectonic plate motion and you will examine different types of plate boundaries. During the unit, you will read how volcanic eruptions are directly related to activity within Earth’s interior. You will learn about different types of volcanism and you will study the three main types of volcanoes: shield, cinder cone, and composite cone.

Mountain Building

Mountains are classified into four main types: volcanic, folded, fault-block, and dome. These types of mountains can be found in various places on Earth’s surface. The mountain-building process occurs mostly at convergent plate boundaries, where colliding plates result in massive forces that create mountains.

In this unit, you will explore how and where mountains are built on Earth’s surface. You will identify the four main types of mountains and at which convergent plate boundary they usually occur. During the unit, you will complete an investigation of anticlines and synclines, which will help you better understand the different types of folded mountains.

Final Review and Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. The final exam may include any material that has been presented throughout the semester. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes and answers to questions in your science journal before you begin to review.

CD/DVD

  • ¥ Prentice Hall Virtual Earth Science CD

Course Sets

  • ¥ Earth Science (Basic, Standard, Honors)

Kit

  • ¥ Science Kit – Earth Science

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Prentice Hall Earth Science

Supplies

  • ¥ Goggles, safety
  • ¥ Thermometers (2)

Honors Earth Science B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the second of two courses that comprise Honors Earth Science. This course is designed to prepare the student to confidently enter and complete advanced college-level Earth science courses. The Prentice Hall text, Earth Science, provides the basis for the course content. This course consists of rigorous curriculum that provides students the opportunity to deeply explore Earth science concepts and engage in independent research. The student will conduct hands-on explorations and virtual simulations, which will enhance traditional lesson formats.  During this course, the student will explore Earth’s history by studying fossils and rock layers; investigate oceanic productivity and features on the sea floor; learn about atmospheric processes, including the water cycle; infer how severe storms form; study the Earth-moon-sun relationship; and explore other celestial bodies, such as stars.

Units:

Geologic Time and Earth’s History

In this introductory unit, you will explore Earth’s early history by studying fossils, the rock record, and the geologic time scale. You will learn how scientists are able to date rock layers using radiometric dating, and how they are able to develop theories of past environments using fossils. In addition, you will learn how the geologic time scale is organized and how it was originally developed by scientists in the 1800s.

During this unit, you will complete a lab on fossils, which will enable you to understand how fossils can be used to define rock sequences. At the end of the unit, you will study Precambrian Time and the Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic Eras. You will learn how Earth changed biologically and geologically during these important time periods in history.

Oceanography

In this unit, your reading assignments and activity components will immerse you in the field of oceanography. From physical features of the ocean floor to ocean productivity and the diversity of marine life, you will find that you cover most aspects of the world’s oceans throughout this unit.

During this unit, you will study the density of seawater. You will be asked to complete a Virtual Lab in which you will experiment with different solids and liquids, to better understand density. At the end of the unit, you will learn about waves, tides, and how ocean waters circulate throughout the world. You will also learn about shoreline processes and how various features are created due to natural causes.

Meteorology: Part 1

In this unit, you will study various topics within the field of meteorology. You will learn how to differentiate between weather and climate, and you will compare and contrast heat and temperature. When studying heat, you will complete an investigation about the specific heat of land and water.

During this unit, you will also explore how clouds form. You will learn about the four processes that lift air—orographic lifting, frontal wedging, convergence, and localized convective lifting—and you will study how different types of precipitation form. At the end of the unit, you will study air pressure and wind. You will learn how air pressure is exerted on objects and how local and regional wind patterns form.

Meteorology: Part 2

In this unit, you will continue your study of meteorology. First you will learn about air masses and how they are classified. Then you will explore fronts, including: warm fronts, cold fronts, stationary fronts, and occluded fronts. You will also study severe storms and you will identify the conditions in which they form.

During this unit, you will explore global climates and the characteristics that define them. You will learn about some of the natural processes that can cause changes in climate, and you will study global warming. Upon completion of the unit, you will have a better understanding of the consequences of global warming and climate change.

Astronomy: Part 1

In this unit, you will begin to study outer space. You will first learn how early astronomers viewed Earth’s place in the solar system, and you will study famous contributors to early astronomy, such as Galileo and Newton. Next you will study the Earth-moon-sun system and you will identify different features on the surface of the moon.

During this unit, you will examine the solar system and its interrelated parts. You will learn about the terrestrial and Jovian planets, as well as other bodies such as asteroids, meteors, and comets. By the end of the lesson, you will be able to explain why Pluto is no longer considered one of the planets in our solar system.

Astronomy: Part 2

In this unit, you will study light and how it applies to the field of astronomy. You will examine the electromagnetic spectrum and you will learn how the Doppler effect can be used to study stars. You will also study the following types of telescopes: refracting, reflecting, radio, and space.

During this unit, you will investigate the orbital speed of the planets in our solar system. You will also learn about star properties and the birth, life, and death of stars. Finally, you will learn about the universe on a greater scale; you will discover that scientists believe in universal expansion and you will study the big bang theory.

Final Review and Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. The final exam may include any material that has been presented throughout the semester. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes and answers to questions in your science journal before you begin to review.

CD/DVD

  • ¥ Prentice Hall Virtual Earth Science CD

Course Sets

  • ¥ Earth Science (Basic, Standard, Honors)

Kit

  • ¥ Science Kit – Earth Science

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Prentice Hall Earth Science

Supplies

  • ¥ Goggles, safety
  • ¥ Thermometers (2)

Honors Physical Science A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the first of two courses that comprise Honors Physical Science. The course consists of rigorous curriculum that provides the student the opportunity to deeply explore chemistry concepts so that he may confidently enter and complete formal honors chemistry high school courses. The course extends the student’s prior knowledge of the properties, states, and structure of matter, explores the dynamics of chemical bonding and reactions, and introduces the student to organic and nuclear chemistry. Honors Physical Science A includes hands-on explorations and virtual simulations to enhance the student’s comprehension of key concepts.

Units:

Science Skills

In this introductory unit, you will learn that physical science is a vast branch of science that covers the physics and chemistry of nonliving things. You will explore how the major branches of science overlap and you will learn how scientists solve problems using the scientific method. By completing this unit, you will have a general understanding of the International System of Units (SI) and how to present scientific data.

Properties and States of Matter

In this first unit on chemistry, your studies will focus on the physical and chemical properties of matter. You will learn how to classify matter and how to identify physical and chemical changes in matter. By completing this unit, you will have a better understanding of the different states of matter, the gas laws, and the processes by which phase changes occur.

Atoms, Elements, and Bonds

In this unit, you will learn how scientists’ theories and models of the atom changed over time. You will study atomic structure, focusing on atomic number, mass number, and isotopes. By completing this unit, you will be more comfortable with how elements are organized within the modern periodic table of elements. You will also have a better understanding of chemical bonds.

Chemical Reactions, Acids, and Bases

In this unit, you will study different types of chemical reactions, energy changes that occur during chemical reactions, and how to describe chemical reactions using chemical equations. You will learn about reaction rates and how to identify physical and chemical equilibrium. You will also study the physical properties of a solution and the general properties and strengths of acids and bases. By completing this unit, you will have a better understanding of changes that occur during chemical reactions.

Nuclear Chemistry

In this unit, you will learn about nuclear chemistry—the study of the processes that take place within an atom’s nucleus. You will focus on the decay processes of a radioactive substance, half-life, radiocarbon dating, and artificial transmutation. You will also study nuclear fission and nuclear fusion; by completing this unit, you will be able to recognize the conditions that are required for these nuclear processes to occur.

Semester Review and Exam

In this unit, you will prepare for and take the final exam. The exam may include any material that has been presented throughout the semester. Since the final exam is comprehensive, it may be helpful to organize your notes and answers to the section and chapter assessments before you begin to review.

CD/DVD

  • ¥ Physical Science Virtual Lab CD

Course Sets

  • ¥ Physical Science (B, S, H)

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Physical Science: Concepts in Action

Honors Physical Science B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the second of two courses that comprise Honors Physical Science. The course consists of rigorous curriculum that provides the student the opportunity to deeply explore physics concepts so that he may confidently enter and complete formal honors physics high school courses. The course extends the student’s prior knowledge of motion, force, work, power, energy, wave mechanics, electricity, magnetism, and the electromagnetic spectrum. In addition, the course includes a unit that focuses on earth science content. Honors Physical Science B includes hands-on explorations and virtual simulations to enhance the student’s comprehension of key concepts.

Units:

Forces and Motion

In this unit, you will study forces and motion. You will focus on distance, displacement, speed, velocity, and acceleration, and then move on to balanced and unbalanced forces, momentum, and universal forces. You will also examine Newton’s three laws of motion as well as Pascal’s principle and Bernoulli’s principle. Finally, you will learn how to calculate pressure and analyze the effects buoyancy has on the apparent weight of an object.

Work and Energy

In this unit, you will study work, power, machines, and energy. You will begin by learning how to calculate work and power; later on, you will learn how to calculate mechanical advantage and efficiency. You will study the six types of simple machines and learn how to identify compound machines. You will learn about heat, temperature, and thermal energy, and you will study conductors, insulators, and the laws of thermodynamics in order to better understand heat and how it can be used.

Waves

In this unit, you will study the properties and behavior of waves. You will learn about different types of mechanical waves and examine how waves are affected by reflection and refraction. You will learn how sound is produced and how the ear is able to detect sound. As you study the electromagnetic spectrum, you will focus on the characteristics of electromagnetic waves and how different waves of the electromagnetic spectrum are used. You will study how light behaves, how light is produced, and how color is determined.

Electricity and Magnetism

In this unit, you will study electricity and magnetism. You will primarily focus on electric charge, current, and circuits; however, you will also learn about common electronic devices and how they work. You will identify the two types of electric current and you will study circuit diagrams for series and parallel circuits. In the latter part of the unit, you will study magnets, magnetic fields, and how electromagnets work. By completing this unit, you will have a better understanding of how electricity and magnetism are related.

Earth in the Universe

In this unit, you will explore various aspects of the solar system, including the different models of the solar system, the Earth-moon system, the eight planets, and the origin of the solar system. You will also study the sun and stars. By completing this unit, you will have a better understanding of how the sun produces energy for the solar system and how stars form.

Semester Review and Exam

In this unit, you will prepare for and take the final exam. The exam may include any material that has been presented throughout the semester. Since the final exam is comprehensive, it may be helpful to organize your notes and answers to section and chapter assessments before you begin to review.

CD/DVD

  • ¥ Physical Science Virtual Lab CD

Course Sets

  • ¥ Physical Science (B, S, H)

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Physical Science: Concepts in Action

Physical Science A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the first of two courses that comprise Physical Science. The course is designed to provide students with an understanding of essential chemistry concepts. The course extends the student’s prior knowledge of the properties, states, and structure of matter, explores the dynamics of chemical bonding and reactions, and introduces the student to nuclear chemistry. Physical Science A includes hands-on explorations and virtual simulations to enhance the student’s comprehension of key concepts.

Units:

Science Skills

In this introductory unit, you will learn that physical science is a vast branch of science that covers the physics and chemistry of nonliving things. You will explore how the major branches of science overlap and you will learn how scientists solve problems using the scientific method. By completing this uniit, you will have a general understanding of the International System of Units (SI) how to present scientific data.

Properties and States of Matter

In this first unit on chemistry, your studies will focus on the physical and chemical properties of matter. You will learn how to classify matter and how to identify physical and chemical changes in matter. By completing this unit, you will have a better understanding of the different states of matter, the gas laws, and the processes by which phase changes occur.

Atoms, Elements, and Bonds

In this unit, you will learn how scientists’ theories and models of the atom changed over time. You will study atomic structure, focusing on atomic number, mass number, and isotopes. By completing this unit, you will be more comfortable with how elements are organized within the modern periodic table of elements. You will also have a better understanding of chemical bonds.

Chemical Reactions, Acids, and Bases

In this unit, you will study different types of chemical reactions, energy changes that occur during chemical reactions, and how to describe chemical reactions using chemical equations. You will learn about reaction rates and how to identify physical and chemical equilibrium. You will also study the physical properties of a solution and the general properties and strengths of acids and bases. By completing this unit, you will have a better understanding of changes that occur during chemical reactions.

Nuclear Chemistry

In this unit, you will learn about nuclear chemistry—the study of the processes that take place within an atom’s nucleus. You will focus on the decay processes of a radioactive substance, half-life, radiocarbon dating, and artificial transmutation. You will also study nuclear fission and nuclear fusion; by completing this unit, you will be able to recognize the conditions that are required for these nuclear processes to occur.

Physical Science A Review and Exam

In this unit, you will prepare for and take the final exam. The exam may include any material that has been presented throughout the semester. Since the final exam is comprehensive, it may be helpful to organize your notes and answers to section and chapter assessments before you begin to review.

CD/DVD

  • ¥ Physical Science Virtual Lab CD

Course Sets

  • ¥ Physical Science (B, S, H)

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Physical Science: Concepts in Action

Physical Science B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the second of two courses that comprise Physical Science. The course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of essential physics and earth science concepts. The physics-focused lessons cover motion, force, work, power, energy, wave mechanics, electricity, magnetism, and the electromagnetic spectrum. Earth science topics include an exploration of the Earth, sun, and planets. Physical Science B includes hands-on explorations and virtual simulations to enhance the student’s comprehension of key concepts.

Units:

Forces and Motion

In this unit, you will study forces and motion. Your studies will focus on distance, displacement, speed, velocity, and acceleration—moving on to balanced and unbalanced forces, momentum, and universal forces. You will examine Newton’s three laws of motion as well as Pascal’s principle and Bernoulli’s principle. You will also learn how to calculate pressure and what effects buoyancy has on the apparent weight of an object.

Work and Energy

In this unit, you will study work, power, machines, and energy. You will begin by learning how to calculate work and power; later on, you will learn how to calculate mechanical advantage and efficiency. You will study the six types of simple machines and learn how to identify compound machines. You will learn about heat, temperature, and thermal energy, and you will study conductors, insulators, and the laws of thermodynamics in order to better understand heat and how it can be used.

Waves

In this unit, you will study the properties and behavior of waves. You will learn about different types of mechanical waves and examine how waves are affected by reflection and refraction. You will learn how sound is produced and how the ear is able to detect sound. As you study the electromagnetic spectrum, you will focus on the characteristics of electromagnetic waves and how different waves of the electromagnetic spectrum are used. You will study how light behaves, how light is produced, and how color is determined.

Electricity and Magnetism

In this unit, you will study electricity and magnetism. You will primarily focus on electric charge, current, and circuits; however, you will also learn about common electronic devices and how they work. You will identify the two types of electric current and you will study circuit diagrams for series and parallel circuits. In the latter part of the unit, you will study magnets, magnetic fields and how electromagnets work. By completing this unit, you will have a better understanding of how electricity and magnetism are related.

Earth in the Universe

In this unit, you will explore various aspects of the solar system, including the different models of the solar system, the Earth-moon system, the eight planets, and the origin of the solar system. You will also study the sun and stars. By completing this unit, you will have a better understanding of how the sun produces energy for the solar system and how stars form.

Semester Exam and Review

In this unit, you will prepare for and take the final exam. The exam may include any material that has been presented throughout the semester. Since the final exam is comprehensive, it may be helpful to organize your notes and answers to section and chapter assessments before you begin to review.

CD/DVD

  • ¥ Physical Science Virtual Lab CD

Course Sets

  • ¥ Physical Science (B, S, H)

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Physical Science: Concepts in Action

Physics A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Algebra 2

Description:
The goal of physics is to describe the physical world using a small number of basic assumptions, concepts, and equations. In this course, emphasis is placed on relating physics to the everyday world. The student will explore the concepts involved with motion in one- and two-dimensions, forces, work and energy, momentum and collisions, circular motion and gravitation. The students will recognize the importance of the laws of thermodynamics.

Approximately 40 percent of the course involves virtual laboratory investigations. Some activities will require ordinary household items such as rulers, meter sticks, balls or marbles, string, paper, and pencils.

Physics A focuses on understanding motion. The student will learn kinematic equations and apply them to various situations. The student will explore forces, work, and energy and apply these concepts in the special case of circular motion. Heat and the laws of thermodynamics are covered.

Units:

Introduction

Welcome to Physics A. This unit introduces the course objectives and explains the grading guidelines for research assignments and laboratory reports. In addition, the unit reviews the scientific method.

Physics and the Laws of Motion

Throughout this unit you will explore the motion of objects. Most of the types of motion described in this unit are likely familiar to you. You will learn about these common types of motion by studying laws of motion, performing calculations, and conducting virtual laboratory experiments.

Energy and Motion

In this unit you will learn about work, energy, and motion. You will study the different kinds of energy that are involved when things move and learn how energy is converted from one form to another during collisions. In addition, you will learn about the forces involved with circular motion and gravitation. You will continue to solve real-world problems and conduct virtual laboratory experiments.

Heat and Thermodynamics

In the previous unit you studied energy. In this unit you will learn about a particular form of energy: heat. Thermodynamics involves understanding how the transfer of heat affects the work done by a system. You will also study the first and second laws of thermodynamics and continue to solve real-world problems and conduct virtual laboratory experiments.

Final Review and Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. The final exam may include any material that has been presented throughout the semester. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes and answers to questions before you begin to review.

Course Sets

  • ¥ Physics (Standard)

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ Partial iText Holt Physics

Textbook

  • ¥ Holt Physics

Physics B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Algebra 2 and Physics A

Description:
The goal of physics is to describe the physical world using a small number of basic assumptions, concepts, and equations. In this course, emphasis is placed on relating physics to the everyday world. The student will learn the characteristics of waves and describe the behavior of waves with emphasis on light and sound. The student will understand the relationship between electricity and magnetism. Finally, the student will gain a simple understanding of atomic physics.
Approximately 40 percent of the course involves virtual laboratory investigations. Some activities will require ordinary household items such as rulers, meter sticks, balls or marbles, string, paper, and pencils.

Physics B focuses on waves, in particular sound and light. Then the course moves to understanding electricity and magnetism and the relationship between the two. It concludes with a basic exploration of atomic physics.

Units:

Waves

In this unit you will explore the behavior of oscillations and waves. You will study periodic motion, analyze the characteristics of sound and light, and learn how waves transport energy. You will perform virtual labs to investigate the relationship between the length and period of a pendulum, and the correlations among frequency, speed, and amplitude of sound waves.

Electricity

In this unit you will explore the properties of electric charges. You will calculate the electric force produced by point charges, interpret electric field lines, learn how capacitors store electrical energy, and compare series and parallel circuits. You will perform a virtual lab to investigate the relationships between voltage and current and resistance and current. In an interactive discussion with your classmates, you will debate if using hybrid electric vehicles may help to solve some of our energy problems and discuss some of the environmental problems associated with carbon emissions.

Magnetism and Atomic Physics

In this unit you will explore the relationship between electricity and magnetism. You will learn how electromagnets work, analyze the forces exerted on charges in a magnetic field, and study a field of physics known as quantum mechanics, which describes the physics of the particles that make up atoms. You will perform virtual labs to investigate the magnitude of the magnetic fields of solenoids and the relationship between kinetic energy, emitted electrons, and the wavelengths of light.

Final Review and Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. The final exam may include any material that has been presented throughout the semester. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes and answers to questions before you begin to review.

Course Sets

  • ¥ Physics (Standard)

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ Partial iText Holt Physics

Textbook

  • ¥ Holt Physics

American Government A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
An in-depth examination of American government and its fundamental principles and organization, American Government A promotes understanding and participation in government by presenting information in a context relevant to students. Students examine government concepts such as the growth of democracy, federalism, separation of powers, and checks and balances. The branches of government—legislative, executive, and judicial—are studied in detail, and activities develop students’ abilities to question, analyze, and evaluate different forms of information.

Units:

Foundations of American Government

In this unit, you will explore the beginnings of government in the United States. You will learn about the political and economic features of American government. You will discover how the American colonies won independence from Great Britain and what models they looked to in creating a new nation. You will study the Constitution, the three branches of government, and the principle of federalism.

The Legislative Branch

In this unit, you will learn about the powers and functions of the legislative branch of the United States government. You will explore the House of Representatives, the Senate, and additional committees and agencies. You will study how Congress works with the president, as well as how new laws are made.

The Executive Branch

In this unit, you will explore the powers and functions of the executive branch of the United States government. You will learn about the responsibilities of the president, vice president, and the cabinet. You will also study the seven major roles of the president and styles of leadership that lead to presidential success. Finally, you will learn about the bureaucratic and civil service systems of the executive branch.

The Judicial Branch

In this unit, you will explore the powers and functions of the judicial branch of the United States government. You will learn about the judicial systems of federal and state courts. You will study the Supreme Court, and learn about how it selects, hears, and decides cases. Finally, you will investigate how the Supreme Court shapes public policy as well as the factors that influence the Court’s decisions.

American Government A Final

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText United States Government

American Government B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
The second of two courses, American Government B starts with an overview of the basic rights and responsibilities of U.S. citizens. Students explore constitutional freedoms, citizen requirements, and aspects of American law. Following units examine the participants in government, including the media, political parties, and interest groups. Students learn about local and state government structures, and complete the course with a unit in comparative politics.

Units:

Liberty and Justice for All

In this unit, you will learn about the basic rights and responsibilities of U.S. citizens. You will explore the freedoms granted by the Bill of Rights. You will also study U.S. immigration policy as well as the requirements for U.S. citizenship. Finally, you will learn about aspects of American law, including the concepts of equal protection, privacy, and equal opportunity.

Participating in Government

In this unit, you will explore the different ways in which Americans participate in the political system. You will learn about the role and organization of political parties. In addition, you will study the election process in the U.S. You will also explore the roles and responsibilities of voters, and discover how they influence and are influenced by the political system. Finally, you will learn about the roles of interest groups, public opinion, and the media in American government.

Public Policies and Services

In this unit, you will explore public policies and services of the U.S. government. You will learn about how the government raises and manages money. You will also study the government’s policies on business, the environment, public health, education, housing, and transportation. Finally, you will learn about the nation’s foreign policy, and how it has changed over time.

State and Local Government

Political and Economic Systems

In this unit, you will identify the characteristics of different types of political systems. You will evaluate the relationship between economic decision-making and political freedom. Finally, you will compare capitalism, socialism, and communism.

American Government B Final

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText United States Government

AP Human Geography A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This course is designed to provide college-level instruction on the patterns and processes that impact the way humans understand, use, and change Earth’s surface. The student will use geographic models, methods, and tools to examine human social organization and its effect on the world. The student will also use maps and geographical data to examine spatial patterns and analyze the changing interconnections among people and places.

AP Human Geography B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completon of AP Human Geography A

Description:
This is the second of two courses that comprise AP Human Geography. In this course, the student will continue to study the systematic patterns and processes that have shaped the way humans understand, use, and alter Earth’s surface. In addition, the student will employ spatial concepts and landscape
analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. The student will also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice.

AP Macroeconomics

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
AP Macroeconomics presents the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. Students will distinguish between absolute and comparative advantage, explore the way the tools of supply and demand are used to analyze how a free-market economy works, and study the concept of a business cycle. In addition, students will study and analyze economic fluctuations, the dynamics of unemployment, and inflation.

Students must take the Advanced Placement Exam in order to receive Advanced Placement credit. Students who do not take the AP® Exam will be awarded Honors level credit.

Units:

Basic Economic Concepts

Before you begin your journey into the field of macroeconomics, you must first understand some basic principles used by economists and government leaders. Unit One will help you examine several key concepts and tools that appear throughout the course. It is unlikely that this information would appear in a free response question but it will be tested in the multiple choice section of the AP Exam in May. Approximately 8-10% of the AP Exam will include material from this unit.

Measurements of Economic Performance

Perhaps one of the most surprising aspects of macroeconomics is how everything in our economy is constantly being measured—using something we call National Income Accounting. In this unit, you will examine the methods used by households, businesses, and government leaders to “measure the economy.” Specifically, you will observe how we keep track of the following key economic indicators: Gross Domestic Product, Inflation, and Unemployment.Material from this unit may be included in the free response section of the AP Macro exam. It will be tested in the multiple-choice section of the course. Approximately 12–16% of the material for the exam will come from this unit.

National Income, Price Determination, and Economic

Now that you have examined some of the basic tools for measuring the economy, now begin using economic models to predict future performance. Every economy has three goals: price stability, low unemployment, and economic growth. By using the models of Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply, we can make assumptions that will help us propose sound economic policy, enabling us to reach our economic goals. After finishing this unit, you should be able to clearly see the effects that certain fiscal policies would have on the economy.Material from Unit Three will be included in the free response section of the AP Macro Exam. It will also be tested in the multiple-choice section of the course. Approximately 20–24 % of the material for the exam will come from this unit.

International Economics

In recent years there has been a lot of media attention paid to the loss of jobs in the United States to overseas workers. Likewise, there are many who would argue that American businesses are not only going overseas, but they are also abusing many of the workers in these developing countries. These are just some of the issues in the dynamics of global economics and international trade. This unit will give you a firm understanding of the reasoning behind international trade, including some of the positives and negatives of what economists call globalization.Material from this unit may be included in the free response section of the AP Macroeconomics Exam. It will be tested in the multiple-choice section of the exam. Approximately 10–15% of the material for the exam will come from this unit.

The Financial Sector

“As you well know, banks have a great impact on the amount of money in the economy of the United States. The banks here on the Macro Islands have that same type of influence. They impact the money supply by loaning money out to customers. But did you know there is more than one definition of the money supply? Are you curious? If so, read on.”Material from this unit may be included in the free response section of the AP Macroeconomics Exam. It will also be tested in the multiple-choice section of the course. Approximately 5–8% of the material for the exam will come from this unit.

Inflation, Unemployment, and Stabilization Policie

After studying the different tools used by the government to control the economy, we can better understand many of the events that shape our everyday life. From buying a car to paying taxes, it is safe to say that the government influences our economic decisions every day. In this unit, we will explore some of the historical and philosophical approaches to using fiscal and monetary tools. Specifically, we will look at different ideas on how to stimulate aggregate demand and aggregate supply. Approximately 15-20% of the material on the AP exam will come from this unit.

Final Review and Comprehensive Exam

You have concluded our tour of the island. You now have the skills to advise the Leader of changes that are necessary for the Macronian economy to flourish. Before you can do that, you will need to take a final exam to show your new knowledge.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Foundations of Economics, AP, 5th Edition

Textbook

  • ¥ AP Edition Foundations of Economics 5th Edition †

AP Microeconomics

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
Microeconomics emphasizes how individuals make choices with limited resources. The student will examine concepts such as supply and demand, factors of production, roles of labor and management, the relationship between the environment and the economy, and the impact of the government on individual decision making processes. The student studies the stock market as an investment option and trace various stocks through the semester using the Wall Street Journal and the Internet as resources.

Students must take the Advanced Placement Exam in order to receive Advanced Placement credit. Students who do not take the AP® Exam will be awarded Honors level credit.

Units:

Unit One

Whether you are dealing with macroeconomics—that is, huge economies and nations—or individual businesses, there are certain basic principles that universally apply. In this unit you will learn some of the underlying mechanisms that drive the subject of microeconomics.

Unit Two

The single most important model used in microeconomics is the study of supply and demand. Simply put, this is a graphical explanation of how prices fluctuate in the marketplace. The model depends on how much people want (demand) and how much suppliers are willing to produce (supply). In most cases, the government allows businesses and individuals to conduct transactions without interference; in other cases, however, the government may regulate prices and production.

Unit Three

Now that you have learned how to determine costs of production and use supply and demand graphs, you must examine how different business structures function in the market place. For example, the nature of doing business for farmers (where there are thousands of competitors) is vastly different than that of the oil industry (where only a few companies control supply). In this unit you will consider the market structure as it pertains to perfect competition, monopolies, and oligopolies. You will also examine the effects of government regulation in the economy.

Unit Four

Now that you have learned how the product market structures work, you will look at the factor or resource market. The factor market is based around factors of production such as land, capital and labor. Since the product market drives the demand for these resources, you say the factor market is a ‘derived demand market’. You will look closely at the Circular Flow Model, how wages are influenced and how financial markets come into play.

Unit Five

In the past four units, you’ve set the stage for how a market can run, but no system is perfectly efficient. In this unit you will analyze why markets fail and learn various solutions to returning balance to a system out of equilibrium. After looking at externalities and government intervention, you will close out the course with an overview of how income distribution and taxes impact a population.

Unit Six

You’ve completed everything you need to know before you report to the board at the Sunny Sea Shell Company. You now have the skills necessary to pass your exam. Good luck!

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Foundations of Economics, AP, 5th Edition

Textbook

  • ¥ AP Edition Foundations of Economics 5th Edition †

AP U.S. History A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of U.S. History

Description:
AP U.S. History covers the material to prepare students for the AP U.S. History Exam. In the first semester, students will understand a broad body of historical knowledge, expressing their ideas clearly in writing. They will also learn to interpret and apply data from original source documents and identify less commonly represented points of view. In AP U.S. History, students will cover the exploration and colonization of America, the rise of nationalism and sectionalism, and onward to the Civil War.

Units:

A New World

U.S. History involves learning about people, events, trends, and turning points of the past five centuries and how they have shaped the development and identity of this nation.  In this unit, you will learn about the first Americans, the Columbian Exchange, colonial societies, the English colonies, and the expansion of the colonies.

Revolution and Independence

The diverse population of the American Colonies contributed to an emerging “American” identity. The colonial population included: British, Scots-Irish, Germans, Irish, Dutch, Swedes, Welsh, Jews, and French. It also included Africans who were brought against their will as slaves. In this unit you will learn about the American Revolution, life in the colonies, a Republican model of government, and the young republic.

The Growing Republic

In the first part of the 1800s America underwent revolutions in transportation and communication.  A strong national economy emerged linking different sections of the country.  At the same time, the slavery issue drove Americans further apart.  In this unit you will learn about the new American government, expanding territories, foreign policy, the Missouri compromise, the rise of a national economy, and a mass democracy.

A House Divided

During the western expansion, the issue of slavery came to a head.  Many Northerners maintained slavery should be banned from the new lands while Southerners believed slavery had to expand into the west or the institution would die.  In this unit you will learn about the United States expansion into the western territories, the secession of the South, and the Civil War.

A New Order

America’s economic expansion, which began in the first half of the nineteenth century, accelerated in the decades following the Civil War. The emergence of new machinery, mass manufacturing, and larger factories sparked the rise of a new industrial order.  In this unit you will learn about the Gilded Age, the rise of big business and a nation on the move.

AP U.S. History A Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText AMERICA Past and Present, AP Edition

Textbook

  • ¥ AP America Past & Present. 9th Edition

AP U.S. History B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of AP U.S. History A

Description:
AP U.S. History covers the material to prepare students for the AP U.S. History Exam. In the first semester, students will understand a broad body of historical knowledge, expressing their ideas clearly in writing. They will also learn to interpret and apply data from original source documents and identify less commonly represented points of view. In AP U.S. History, students will cover the exploration and colonization of America, the rise of nationalism and sectionalism, and onward to the Civil War.

Units:

Becoming a Modern Nation

Earlier in the course, you learned that the nation’s economy boomed in the late nineteenth century. By the 1890s, the United States had become the most industrialized country in the world. In this unit you will explore the role of large-scale industrialization, urbanization, and mass migrations during this time, the Progressive Era. Then, you will examine the United States’ first steps toward imperialism and study of the causes, events, and effects of World War I. Finally, you will compare values and ideals held by different groups during the roaring twenties.

Facing Challenges at Home and Abroad

By the end of 1929, it looked likely that prosperous times were over for the United States as the economy descended into the worst depression in the nation’s history. In this unit, you will explore the economic, social, and political challenges faced by Americans home and abroad during the Great Depression through World War II. You will also have the opportunity to analyze the causes and effects of the Great Depression, determine the reasons for the political victories of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and the subsequent embrace of the New Deal. In the latter part of the unit, you will learn how involvement in World War II increased America’s role in global affairs.

An Age of Confidence and Anxiety

For more than 20 years following World War II, the United States experienced a period of unprecedented prosperity. During this time, however, Americans were challenged by several tumultuous events. In this unit, you will analyze the quarter century following World War II by studying the Cold War era, the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War, and the oil crisis. At the end of the unit, you will have an opportunity to evaluate models of historical periodization, recognizing that specific dates privilege particular regions or groups.

Modern Times

Events in recent history have repeatedly reshaped the social, economic, and political currents in the United States. In this unit, you will explore the events of the last 30 years in American history. You will learn about the resurgence of conservative Republicanism and the presidencies of Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, and George W. Bush—in addition to the Democratic presidencies of Bill Clinton and Barack Obama. You will also examine the foreign policy challenges the United States faced in the 1990s. Finally, you will look at the events that have shaped the beginning of the twenty-first century, including global terrorism and immigration.

Understanding American History

Throughout this course, you have read about countless events in American history. In this unit, you will have the opportunity to revisit the themes of America’s history to create a better understanding of the big picture of the nation’s history. You will analyze how the understanding of American identity has changed over time, examine how the government’s role in labor relations changed throughout history, analyze the importance of milestones in American political history, and identify the role of technology advances in American labor history.

AP U.S. History B Exam

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText AMERICA Past and Present, AP Edition

Textbook

  • ¥ AP America Past & Present. 9th Edition

AP United States Government

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of HS level government course

Description:
AP U.S. Government surveys the complex subjects of the United States government and politics. Students will make detailed analyses of the processes and institutions (both formal and informal) by which the political system functions and policy decisions are made. These analyses include the Constitutional structure of government, participatory politics, the formal institutions of power (and extra-constitutional influences on them), and public policy and individual rights and liberties.

Units:

Constitutional Foundations

The study of American politics involves not only the study of the U.S. Constitution, but also the many factors that influenced its development and implementation. When the Constitution was written, the framers could not possibly foresee the changes in the country, its people and the available technology. In this unit we will evaluate sources of information, begin looking at the beliefs of the American population and then consider the making of the U.S. Constitution.

Civil Liberties and Rights

Americans have been protesting and asking for “redress of grievances” since before the revolutionary war. They considered it their right as Englishmen to demand change as do Americans today. Throughout our history people have recognized injustice and worked to change it through peaceful means. The middle of the twentieth century saw our liberty to petition government come together again, this time with the demand for civil rights for all. In this unit, we will examine our liberties and our civil rights and the policies and court cases designed to protect them both.

People and Politics

Our government is based on the belief that the ultimate power in our system rests with “We the People.” In this unit you will study how the people are linked to the institutions of government and how they exercise their political power.

The Policymakers

Who takes action in response to a problem in our country? Our policymakers, Congress, the president, the federal bureaucracy, and the federal courts, all respond to the issues of “We the People.” In our system of government there are many voices to be heard and no one policymaker can act alone. The challenge for policymakers is to work together to make the best decisions for the country’s health and prosperity. In this unit you will examine how the three brances of American government influence and create public policy.

Public Policy

When there is a problem in our country, many Americans expect the government to “do something” especially when the problem is widespread. At the same time, many Americans distrust government and want to limit its power. This contradictory political culture leads to a narrow range of options for policymakers. In this unit we will look at how policy is created, implemented, evaluated, and then revised or terminated.

AP U.S. Government Exam

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Gov’t in America:People,Politics,and Policy

Textbook

  • ¥ AP Edition! Government in America. 15th Edition

AP World History A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
NovaNET Advance online courses are media rich, multi-media courses. This course provides a student-centered curriculum focused on learning mastery of critical AP World History concepts. This course meets the curricular requirements established by the College Board. Students have the opportunity to develop skills and show mastery in a variety of assessment types.

Units:

Foundations – Time Period 8000 B.C.E. to 600 C.E.

Time Period 600 C.E. to 1450 C.E.

Time Period 1450 C.E. to 1750 C.E.

AP World History B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
NovaNET Advance online courses are media rich, multi-media courses. This course provides a student-centered curriculum focused on learning mastery of critical AP World History concepts. This course meets the curricular requirements established by the College Board. Students have the opportunity to develop skills and show mastery in a variety of assessment types.

Units:

Time Period 1750 C.E. to 1914 C.E.

Time Period 1914 C.E. to the Present

Economics

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
For Georgia students, Personal Finance is a prerequisite for Economics

Description:
From the stock market to the intricacies of U.S. monetary policy, Economics explores how modern capitalism and the global economy works, and introduces students to concepts in both macro- and microeconomics. Students learn about supply and demand, labor issues, financial markets, taxes, and international trade.

Units:

Introduction to Economics

In the first unit of Economics, you will be introduced to the basic ideas of economics. You will study scarcity, the factors of production, decision making, and opportunity cost. You will also examine how societies have developed different economic systems to make choices about resource allocation. Finally, you will study the American free enterprise system.

How Markets Work

In this unit, you will study the factors that affect the way markets perform. You will learn about demand, consumer desire for a product, and how it is affected by other economic factors. In addition, you will examine supply and its role in the market. Both supply and demand affect prices, which you will also learn about in this unit. Finally, you will study the four types of market structures and identify their advantages and disadvantages.

Business and Labor

In this unit, you will learn about how the world of work is organized. You will develop an understanding of the types of business organizations, including sole proprietorships, parnerships, and corporations. You will also examine the history and development of organized labor as well as factors that determine wages. Finally, you will learn about trends in the labor force and in wages and benefits.

Money, Banking, and Finance

In this unit, you will learn about money, banking, and finance. You will examine the characteristics of money, the historic role of banks, and trends in banking today. You will also study the world of finance and develop an understanding of savings and investment, including investment options, such as stocks and bonds.

Measuring Economic Performance

In this unit, you will discover how economic performance is measured. You will learn about the calculation and use of gross domestic product and the significance of business cycles. In addition, you will study economic growth and the factors that contribute to it. You will examine the economic challenges of unemployment, inflation, and poverty, and the effect of these challenges on the economy.

Government and the Economy

In this unit, you will learn about the ways the government obtains and spends resources as well as how it intervenes in the economy. You will study taxes and federal spending. You will also learn about fiscal policy and the different ways economists view the role of government in the economy. Finally, you will examine monetary policy, the money creation process, bank regulation, and the role of the Federal Reserve.

The Global Economy

In the final unit of Economics, you will learn about international trade and economic development. You will study reasons why nations trade, barriers to trade, international cooperation, and ways in which trade is measured. Finally, you will study levels of economic development and the changes that are occurring throughout much of the world today.

Economics Final Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Course Sets

  • ¥ Economics (Basic, Standard)

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Prentice Hall Economics:Principles in Action

Workbook

  • ¥ Economics Guided Reading and Review Workbook

Geography and Society

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
Students build the skills they acquired in World Geography. In addition, students delve into different aspects of geography, such as culture, government, and economics. Students also build practical skills using geographic concepts such as weather forecasting and map creation.

Units:

Geography Workshop

In this unit, you will begin by learning about the different perspectives that underpin the science of geography. Once you have become familiar with those concepts, you will work extensively with the primary tool of a geographer: maps. From examining how maps have evolved over centuries, their different forms and uses, and utilizing maps, you will gain an appreciation for the work that geographers do in our society.

Physical Systems

In this unit, you will examine the physical systems that shape and affect our every day lives through weather and climate. You will begin by examining the major components of Earth’s physical systems and how the Earth’s relationship with the Sun plays a dramatic role in our world. Once you have completed your study of those systems, you will study how those systems affect the climate and weather all over the planet.

Environmental Issues

In this unit, you will examine the environmental issues that affect the biodiversity of our planet. You will examine the impact that humans have on the environment as well as what can be done to honor and protect it. Your study of population growth, land use, conservation, and climate change will identify factors that can positively influence and protect the planet. You will watch a multimedia presentation in order to investigate the available sources of renewable and nonrenewable energy and explore which sources have the least impact on the natural world.

Human Systems

In this unit, you will examine components of culture and how cultures change over time. You will learn about the primary world religions and belief systems of the eastern and western hemispheres.  Your exploration of how societies govern themselves will include an analysis of political maps. By the end of this unit, you will draw your own conclusions about the electoral process governing the United States.

Migration and Cultural Exchange

In this unit, you will examine what makes the United States a melting pot. You will interpret population patterns and consider solutions for managing population growth. Your study of the causes and effects of migration will include two primary accounts, one from a Mexican migrant and one from an Afghan refugee. Your study of cultural diffusion and multiculturalism will identify factors that unite and divide humans living in the United States and around the world.

Resources and Conflict

In this unit, you will study and learn how to examine ongoing conflicts all over the globe. Using critical thinking and analysis, you will learn what kinds of conflicts exist, who the key players or groups in those conflicts are, and why conflicts may be happening. Through learning how to apply these critical analysis skills, you will also learn how to compare and contrast existing conflicts in order to gain a greater and more complex understanding of future conflicts around the world.

Geography and Society Final Exam

Honors American Government A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
A rigorous, in-depth examination of American government and its fundamental principles and organization, Honors American Government A promotes understanding and participation in government by presenting information in a context relevant to students. Students examine government concepts such as the growth of democracy, federalism, separation of powers, and checks and balances. The branches of government—legislative, executive, and judicial—are studied in detail, and activities develop students’ critical thinking skills, including the ability to question, analyze, and evaluate different forms of information.

Units:

Foundations of American Government

In this unit, you will explore the beginnings of government in the United States. You will learn about the political and economic features of American government. You will discover how the American colonies won independence from Great Britain and what models they looked to in creating a new nation. You will study the Constitution, the three branches of government, and the principle of federalism.

The Legislative Branch

In this unit, you will learn about the powers and functions of the legislative branch of the United States government. You will explore the House of Representatives, the Senate, and additional committees and agencies. You will study how Congress works with the president, as well as how new laws are made.

The Executive Branch

In this unit, you will explore the powers and functions of the executive branch of the United States government. You will learn about the responsibilities of the president, vice president, and the cabinet. You will also study the seven major roles of the president and styles of leadership that lead to presidential success. Finally, you will learn about the bureaucratic and civil service systems of the executive branch.

The Judicial Branch

In this unit, you will explore the powers and functions of the judicial branch of the United States government. You will learn about the judicial systems of federal and state courts. You will study the Supreme Court, and learn about how it selects, hears, and decides cases. Finally, you will investigate how the Supreme Court shapes public policy as well as the factors that influence the Court’s decisions.

Honors American Government A Final

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText United States Government

Honors American Government B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
The second of two courses, Honors American Government B starts with an overview of the basic rights and responsibilities of U.S. citizens. Students explore constitutional freedoms, citizen requirements, and aspects of American law. Following units examine the participants in government, including the media, political parties, and interest groups. Students learn about local and state government structures, and complete the course with a unit in comparative politics. This Honors level course includes more rigorous curriculum and greater opportunities for students explore concepts, engage in independent research, and demonstrate critical thinking skills.

Units:

Liberty and Justice for All

In this unit, you will learn about the basic rights and responsibilities of U.S. citizens. You will explore freedoms granted by the Bill of Rights. You will also study U.S. immigration policy as well as the requirements for U.S. citizenship. Finally, you will learn about aspects of American law, including the concepts of equal protection, privacy, and equal opportunity.

Participating in Government

In this unit, you will explore the different ways in which Americans participate in the political system. You will learn about the role and organization of political parties. In addition, you will study the election process in the U.S. You will also explore the roles and responsibilities of voters, and discover how they influence and are influenced by the political system. Finally, you will learn about the roles of interest groups, public opinion, and the media in American government.

Public Policies and Services

In this unit, you will explore public policies and services of the U.S. government. You will learn about how the government raises and manages money. You will also study the government’s policies on business, the environment, public health, education, housing, and transportation. Finally, you will learn about the nation’s foreign policy, and how it has changed over time.

State and Local Government

In this unit, you will learn about different roles and responsibilities of state and local governments. You will explore the similarities and differences in their history and organization. Finally, you will learn about the ways in which state and local government influences your daily life.

Political and Economic Systems

In this unit, you will identify the characteristics of different types of political systems. You will evaluate the relationship between economic decision-making and political freedom. Finally, you will compare capitalism, socialism, and communism.

Honors American Government B Final

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText United States Government

Honors United States History A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the first of two Honors courses that comprise United States History. The student begins by examining early American history focusing on key events of the American Revolution up to the causes and conclusion of the American Civil War. The student will then study the Gilded Age in which many changes took place in political and business practices, immigration and demographic changes, to the equality of African Americans, and the effect of labor unions. Next, the student will examine the emergence of the United States as a world power focusing on imperialism and how that shaped financial and political policies in the United States and abroad. The student will also focus on the United States policy on World War I. Finally, the student will address the impact of economic, social, and political change on American culture during the two decades following World War I. The main focus will be the Great Depression and how Franklin Roosevelt and his New Deal policies led the United States out of economic disaster.

Units:

The Early American Republic

In this unit, you will review your knowledge of early American history by surveying key events from the Revolutionary War to the Civil War. You will investigate the causes of the American Revolution, including the influence of the Enlightenment. You will analyze America’s founding documents such as the Articles of Confederation, Declaration of Independence, The United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Early English documents such as Magna Carta and the English Bill of Rights will be examined to show how they influenced our system of government in the new world. You will trace the realities of of economic power, racial prejudice, and conservatism of the time period. Through an analysis of various plans for Reconstruction, students will assess the nature of the power struggle over how to restore the nation following the Civil War. Students will apply previously-developed historical thinking skills and be introduced to new skills such as document analysis, making comparisons, analysis of subtext, and conducting historical research.

Industrialization of the United States

In this unit, you will study key historical events from the Gilded Age. You will demonstrate how American culture was transformed by economic, social, and political changes during the late 19th century. Using a regional approach, the unit explains industrialization in the North, West and South. Topics and case studies include business and political practices, demographic changes, impacts on urban and rural areas, and the dynamics of interactions among different immigrant and cultural groups. You will evaluate the efforts of farmers’ organizations and labor unions to improve working conditions. You will also examine African-American organizations created to advocate social and political equality, and the role of government reform at the local, state, and national levels.

Emergence of the Modern United States

This unit covers the United States during the Progressive Era, from the late 1800s to the end of World War I. You will learn about the reforms enacted during the Progressive Era focusing on election reform, regulation of business, environmental protection, and women’s suffrage. Students will also examine how and why the United States emerged as a world power. From early attempts to acquire territories, to land gained in the Spanish-American War, to establishment of spheres of influence, and to the participation in World War I, students will analyze the United State’s rise as an imperialistic power.

Prosperity and Depression

This unit addresses the impacts of economic, social, and political change on American culture during the two decades following World War I. Students will analyze various reactions during the 1920s including significant changes in economic behaviors and cultural conflicts. Students will have the opportunity to analyze multiple causations and devastating effects of the Great Depression. Students will determine the reasons for political victories of Franklin Delano Roosevelt and the subsequent embrace of the New Deal. Students will investigate the general goals of the New Deal and examine criticisms of increased government intervention. Students will conclude the unit by evaluating the effectiveness of the New Deal in addressing the many problems of depression in a modern economy.

Review & Final

You will review and study for your U.S. History A Honors exam by completing the given review activities and studying your notes and assignments.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText United States History: Survey Edition

Textbook

  • ¥ United States History: Survey Edition †

Honors United States History B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the second of two courses that comprise Honors U.S. History. In this course, the student will learn about the people, events, and ideas that shaped the United States from World War II on. The student will begin by exploring the causes, events, and effects of World War II. Then the student will study the Cold War era and the tumultuous events of the 1950s and 1960s, including the civil rights movement and the Vietnam War. Next the student will learn about the latter part of the twentieth century, including the scandals and economic troubles of the 1970s, the rebirth of the conservative movement and end of the Cold War in the 1980s, and the information revolution of the 1990s. Finally, the student will consider the challenges of the twenty-first century. Throughout this course, the student will study primary sources, and use both primary and secondary sources as a basis for a semester-long research project.

Units:

World War II and Postwar America

This unit focuses on the events of World War II and the beginning of the Cold War. You will learn about the causes, events, and effects of World War II. You will learn about changes in the United States as World War II ended and the Cold War began. You will examine how tensions developed between the Soviet Union and the United States and how those tensions affected foreign policies and life at home. In this unit, you will also start a semester-long project, the writing of a research paper.

Challenges and Change

This unit focuses on the major changes in the United States during the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. You will begin the unit by examining the events of the civil rights movement. You will learn about the policies of Presidents Kennedy and Johnson, including the war in Vietnam. You will learn about the protests that swept the nation for women’s and minorities’ rights and against the Vietnam War. Finally, you will learn about key events of the 1970s, including the Watergate scandal, stagflation, and the Iran hostage crisis. Throughout the unit, you will continue to work on your major research project.

Changing and Enduring Issues

This unit focuses on the events of the last 30 years in American history. You will learn about the resurgence of conservative Republicanism and the presidencies of Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, and George W. Bush—in addition to the Democratic presidency of Bill Clinton. You will also learn about the main domestic and international events of the 1990s. Finally, you will look at the events that have shaped the beginning of the twenty-first century, including global terrorism and immigration. At the end of the unit, you will finish and submit your major research project.

Semester Review

In this unit, you will review for and take your U.S. History Semester B exam.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText United States History: Survey Edition

Textbook

  • ¥ United States History: Survey Edition †

Honors World History A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
Honors World History A includes more rigorous curriculum and greater opportunities for students to explore concepts, engage in independent research, and demonstrate critical thinking skills. Comprehensive in scope, the course begins with a review of ancient civilizations, and then moves through the emergence of modern nation-states, concluding with the Napoleonic Wars. Primary source documents bring the past to life, introducing students to people and cultures across the world and across time.

Units:

Reading and Writing for History

In this unit, you will practice skills that will make you a better historian. You will hone your critical reading skills and develop a process for preparing and writing a research paper. Finally, you will learn how to identify reliable research sources and avoid committing plagiarism.

Geography and History

In this unit, you will learn about the relationship between geography and historic events. You will learn more about the purpose and uses of globes and maps and examine the themes and elements associated with the study of geography.

The World Before Modern Times

In this unit, you will learn about the emergence of civilizations from prehistory to about 1500. You will study ancient societies of Western Asia, Egypt, India, and China. You will also examine the contributions of the Greek, Roman, Arab, African, and Asian empires to world history. Finally, your study of ancient American civilizations will conclude the first unit of the course.

The Early Modern World – Part I

In this unit, you will learn about world cultures between 1400 and 1800. You will study the Renaissance and its impact on people’s interpretation of the world around them. In addition, you will explore the role of religion and study the effect of the Protestant Reformation and the Catholic Counter-Reformation. You will also look at various societies’ explorations around the globe. Finally, you will examine social and political struggles in Europe between 1550 and 1715.

The Early Modern World – Part II

In this unit, you will continue to study the contributions of world cultures between 1400 and 1815. You will examine the expansion of Muslim Empires throughout the world and the impact of the religion of Islam. Additionally, you will learn about cultures of the East Asian world, including China, Japan, and Korea. You will also examine the causes and effects of the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment and study their impact on the American colonies. You will conclude World History A by learning about the French Revolution and its consequences, as well as studying the contributions of Napoleon.

Honors World History A Final Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Course Sets

  • ¥ World History (Basic, Standard, Honors)

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Glencoe World History: Modern Times

Workbook

  • ¥ World History Active Reading Note-Taking Guide

Honors World History B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Honors World History A

Description:
The second of two courses, Honors World History B starts with the Industrial Revolution and the social and technological changes that swept across Europe and North America. The advances and turmoil of the 20th century are studied in depth, and the course ends with the opportunities and challenges of today’s global networked society. A more rigorous curriculum and independent research opportunities allow for an in-depth exploration of concepts and the development of critical thinking skills.

Units:

An Era of European Imperialism

In this unit, you will explore the causes and effects of European Imperialism between 1800 and 1914. You will examine how industrialization and nationalism influenced empire-building around the globe. In addition, you will learn about European colonies in Southeast Asia, Africa, India, and Latin America, and consider the consequences of imperialism on indigenous peoples. Finally, you will study social and political challenges in China and Japan in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

The Twentieth Century Crisis

In this unit, you will study social, political, and military struggles throughout the world between 1914 and 1945. You will examine the causes and effects of World War I, and study how the outcome of that world laid the foundation for a second world war. Additionally, you will study world cultural trends between the world wars. You will also explore the role of nationalism in the Middle East, Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Finally, you will learn about the reasons for and consequences of World War II.

Toward a Global Civilization

In this final unit of World History, you will learn about developments throughout the world between 1945 and the present. You will examine the causes and consequences of the Cold War and trace the influence of communism throughout the postwar world. You will also learn about the emergence of new economies and independent nations in Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Finally, you will consider the challenges facing the global civilization and how nations try to achieve peace.

Honors World History B Final Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Course Sets

  • ¥ World History (Basic, Standard, Honors)

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Glencoe World History: Modern Times

Workbook

  • ¥ World History Active Reading Note-Taking Guide

Personal Finance

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
Through real-world applications and clear, engaging lessons, Personal Finance prepares students for making sound financial decisions. Exercises illustrate the influence of economics in daily life and how financial decisions made today affect the future.

Units:

Money Management and Career Planning

In the first unit of Personal Finance, you will define personal financial planning, and explore the six steps of financial planning. You will also identify economic factors that affect personal financial decisions and explain how opportunity costs are associated with personal financial decisions. Finally, you will identify strategies for achieving financial goals at different stages of life.

Taxes, Retirement, and Health Insurance

In Unit 2 of Personal Finance, you will learn to identify the personal issues to consider when choosing and planning your career. You will also understand how education and training affect career advancement. You will study tax strategies, insurance and risk management, health insurance and financial planning, and culminate with a discussion of retirement planning.

Consumer Credit and Investing

In this unit, you will identify different types of financial services, and calculate the cost and benefits of different savings plans. You will study how to build and protect your credit rating. You will discuss ways to obtain funds for investing and identify the factors that affect their investment choices. You will also identify the main types of savings and investment alternatives and explain the steps involved in developing a personal investment plan. As you explore your own personal plan, you will identify sources of financial information.

Starting a Business

In this unit, you will study the three essential types of business arrangements, namely sole proprietorship, general and limited partners, and types of corporations. As you study how to form a corporation and explore its advantages and disadvantages, you will consider the broader concern of financial management for a business. As the lessons progress, you will formulate a business plan and explain its components. Similarly, you will describe the aspects of a financial plan and explain the importance of accounting in financial management. Finally, you will explore the primary functions of accounting.

Operating your Business

In this unit, you will be defining terms such as: start-up costs, operating costs, and reserve funds, and you will show how this is related to entrepreneurship. You will also identify sources of personal and private financing, and discuss the options available through bank funding. Additionally, you will examine the role of accounting and record keeping. Finally, you will explore the nuances of accounting, and you will apply this analysis to how businesses run from their inception to their perpetuation and growth.

Review and Final Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review.

United States History A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the first of two courses that comprise United States History. This course will explore the growth of American society and the emergence of the United States as a world power. The course covers the significant developments in America’s past from Reconstruction to World War I with a brief review of early settlement, colonization, and the development of America as an independent nation. The student will focus on American political, economic, and social history from a chronological point of view. Activities in this course are designed to develop the student’s abilities to question, read, analyze, interpret, and evaluate different forms of information, as well as to communicate his or her ideas to others. Geography skills will be interwoven in the lessons, as the student makes connections between the evolution of America’s geography and its historical impact.

Units:

The Early American Republic

In this unit, you will review your knowledge of early American history by surveying key events from the Revolutionary War to the Civil War. You will investigate the causes of the American Revolution, including the influence of the Enlightenment. You will analyze America’s founding documents. You will trace the growing sectionalism during the 1800s, ending in the Civil War. Finally, you will determine the effects of the Civil War and Reconstruction on the United States.

Industrialization of the United States

In this unit, you will study key historical events from the Gilded Age. Studying inventions, business practices and labor unions, you will trace the effects of the Second Industrial Revolution. You will learn about the effect of immigration and urbanization on America’s landscape. You will examine the changes in the South and the West during this period, and growing political and social movements throughout the country.

Emergence of the Modern United States

This unit covers the United States during the Progressive Era, from the late 1800s to the end of World War I. In this unit, you will learn about the reforms enacted during the Progressive Era. You will explore the United States’ first steps toward imperialism. The unit will finish with your study of the causes, events, and effects of World War I.

Prosperity and Depression

This unit focuses on the United States during the 1920s, and the 1930s. You will examine the cultural, economic, and political trends of the 1920s. You will learn about the causes of the Great Depression, its effect on everyday Americans and efforts to bring the country back to prosperity. You will particularly evaluate the effects of Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal on the United States.

Review & Final

You will review information from Units 1–4 and take your Semester A Exam.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText United States History: Survey Edition

Textbook

  • ¥ United States History: Survey Edition †

United States History B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is the second of two courses that comprise United States History. This course will continue the study of American history, tracing the changes in American society from World War II through the present. This course will continue to follow the chronology of American political, economic, and social history. Every unit will provide practice with critical social studies skills, including analyzing primary sources, recognizing point of view, identifying cause and effect, evaluating different forms of information, and communicating ideas to others. Geography skills are interwoven in the lessons, as the student makes connections between the evolution of America’s geography and its impact on historical events.

Units:

World War II and Postwar America

This unit focuses on the events of World War II and the beginning of the Cold War. You will learn about the causes, events, and effects of World War II. You will learn about changes in the United States as World War II ended and the Cold War began. You will examine how tensions developed between the Soviet Union and United States and how those tensions affected foreign policies and life at home.  In this unit, you will also start a semester-long project, the writing of a research paper.

Challenges and Change: Part 1

This unit focuses on the major changes in the United States during the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. You will begin the unit by examining the events of the civil rights movement. You will learn about the policies of Presidents Kennedy and Johnson, including the war in Vietnam. Finally, you will learn about the protests that swept the nation for women’s and minorities’ rights and against the Vietnam War. Throughout the unit, you will continue to work on your major research project.

Challenges and Change: Part 2

This unit continues to focus on the major changes in the United States during the 1960s and 1970s. You will begin the unit by examining the events of the women’s rights movement. You will learn about the policies of Presidents Nixon, Ford, and Carter. Finally, you will learn about key events of the 1970s, including the Watergate scandal, stagflation, and the Iran hostage crisis. Throughout the unit, you will continue to work on your major research project.

Changing and Enduring Issues

This unit focuses on the events of the last thirty years in American history. You will learn about the resurgence of conservative Republications and the presidencies of Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush. You will learn about the main domestic and international events of the 1990s. Finally you will look at the events that have shaped the beginning of the 21st century, including global terrorism and immigration. You will finish your major research project.

U.S. History B Semester Review

In this unit, you will review for the U.S. History B Semester Exam. You will study by using the graphic organizers from each unit, by taking a practice test, and by choosing from a list of other review strategies. Finally, you will take the exam itself.

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText United States History: Survey Edition

Textbook

  • ¥ United States History: Survey Edition †

World Geography

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
Students master basic geography skills and principles in this course, which covers major locations, the United States, world economic activity, and understanding and using maps. Students acquire an understanding of multiculturalism and the relationships between people and their environment.

Units:

People and Places

In this unit, you’ll gain some background in the origins of geography in order to get a sense of where and how this science began. This brief history will also give you some perspective on just how much our knowledge of geography has changed and grown. Glimpses into the travel journals of Marco Polo and the epic story of Odysseus, among others, reflect how imagination took the wheel when facts could go no further. You’ll also follow a timeline of maps, from the Babylonians simplistic clay-tablet world map to the minutely detailed satellite maps of today.

After delving in the beginnings of geography, you will familiarize yourself with the basics of physical geography, a necessary prerequisite to exploring human geography. You will scrutinize the anatomy of our planet, from its interior to its ionosphere. The science of plate tectonics will be introduced, and then you will dive into the topics of oceans and continents. You’ll also examine the concepts of the latitude and longitude, hemisphere, equator, and prime meridian. Climate and its effects on human populations.

You will learn what defines human geography and how it is different than physical geography. You will also familiarize yourself with the aspects of study that fall under the umbrella term of human geography, how each in some way is intricately woven into the natural landscape of the planet.

Europe

In this unit, you’ll first examine the topographical characteristics of Europe and become acquainted with its flora and fauna (the plants and animals) of the continent, and take a trip in the process. You’ll then get an overview of the many nationalities that make up Europe and pay a virtual visit to a selected country, keeping a travel journal of your stay. In the final lesson of the unit, you’ll learn about the European Union, a group of 27 (to date) European nations that have made a commitment to work together as one entity to keep peace and grow economically.

Africa

In this unit, you will examine the topographical characteristics of Africa and discover its incredible animals and plants. In the process, you will take a virtual field trip to an African nation to study one of its ecosystems. You will get an overview of the many peoples and tribes that make up Africa and pay a virtual visit to a selected country, keeping a travel journal of your stay. Finally, you will learn about the economic and political climates in Africa, and the efforts being made to include this continent into the globalization movement.

Asia

In Unit 4, you have a lot of ground to cover—millions of miles, in fact. Your virtual trek now takes you to the vast and extraordinarily diverse continent of Asia. Because Asia encompasses vast stretches of the planet, scores of countries, and hundreds of individual cultures, economies, and governments, the first lesson in this unit will include a general introduction to Asia through video clips. Once you have an overview of the region, you will explore its physical geography. In lesson 2, you’ll explore the culture of India, in which ancient traditions and religions meet modern technology and lifestyles. China’s economic and political identity will be examined in lessons 3 and 4, as this country rides the fast track to becoming a global economic superpower.

North America

In this unit, you will first examine the physical terrain of the continent and become acquainted with its rich biodiversity. You will also have the chance to pay a virtual visit to one of the few mega diverse countries in the world. Then, you will get an overview of the many peoples and cultures that make up North America and take another virtual trip to a selected country, keeping a travel journal of your stay. In the final lesson of the unit, you will learn about the political and economical landscape of this continent’s major players and take a look at the economic phenomenon of free trade agreements, in particular, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).If you are from North America, this unit gives you the grand tour of your own backyard. If you are from another part of the world, it may provide a rich and informative guide to this amazing continent.

South America

With this unit, you arrive on the next continent in your whirlwind virtual world tour: South America. Like all the other continents you’ve studied thus far, South America has its own character, both physically and culturally. Its culture is similar to that of Central America, but with a stronger Latin influence. Even with all the cultural diversity found throughout this continent’s 13 nations, the Latin flavor is ever present.

For starters, you’ll take a look at the physical features of South America, which presents a varied landscape and holds several “world’s no. 1″ titles in the physical geography hall of fame (longest mountain range, biggest river, to name two). In the first lesson, you’ll also take a little excursion off the coast of Ecuador to discover the weird and wonderful flora and fauna of the Galapagos Islands. In Lesson 2, you will learn how the story of the Spanish invasion of Mexico and Central America was continued into South America, and how its effects are evident in today’s South American culture. Yet the continent has attracted an ethnic rainbow of people from throughout the world, and you’ll discover how these immigrants have adapted while still maintaining their cultural identities. For the unit’s final lessons, you will review the frequently changing political scene in South America and learn how South America, too, is working to facilitate economic growth

Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands

In this unit, you will study the final region in your virtual world tour: Oceania. You will learn more about its diverse and beautiful physical geography, as well as the diversity of cultures that have shaped Oceania’s history. You will examine Australia, New Zealand, and some of the Pacific Island nations of Oceania.

Current Issues

In Unit 8, you will gain an understanding of the characteristics of populations, including how they are distributed over the land, what spurs populations to grow, and the stages of growth—known as demographic transition. You will then study the topic of overpopulation, learn about exponential growth, and learn the world’s population— 6.6 billion. As well, you will explore the causes and consequences of human overpopulation. In lessons 3 and 4, you will delve into what is arguably the most dire environmental issue we face—global warming. You will examine such questions as how did this phenomenon happen. Then you will be introduced to possible ways to mitigate this predicament while exploring what sustainability entails.

Final Review and Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with the questions.

World History A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
Comprehensive in scope, the World History courses begin with a review of ancient civilizations, and then moves through the emergence of modern nation-states, concluding with the Napoleonic Wars. Primary source documents bring the past to life, introducing students to people and cultures across the world and across time.

Units:

Reading and Writing for History

In this unit, you will practice skills that will make you a better historian. You will hone your critical reading skills and develop a process for preparing and writing a research paper. Finally, you will learn how to identify reliable research sources and avoid committing plagiarism.

Geography and History

In this unit, you will learn about the relationship between geography and historic events. You will learn more about the purpose and uses of globes and maps and examine the themes and elements associated with the study of geography.

The World Before Modern Times

In this unit, you will learn about the emergence of civilizations from prehistory to about 1500. You will study ancient societies of Western Asia, Egypt, India, and China. You will also examine the contributions of the Greek, Roman, Arab, African, and Asian empires to world history. Finally, your study of ancient American civilizations will conclude the first unit of the course.

The Early Modern World – Part I

In this unit, you will learn about world cultures between 1400 and 1800. You will study the Renaissance and its impact on people’s interpretation of the world around them. In addition, you will explore the role of religion and study the effect of the Protestant Reformation and the Catholic Counter-Reformation. You will also look at various societies’ explorations around the globe. Finally, you will examine social and political struggles in Europe between 1550 and 1715.

The Early Modern World – Part II

In this unit, you will continue to study the contributions of world cultures between 1400 and 1815. You will examine the expansion of Muslim Empires throughout the world and the impact of the religion of Islam. Additionally, you will learn about cultures of the East Asian world, including China, Japan, and Korea. You will also examine the causes and effects of the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment and study their impact on the American colonies. You will conclude World History A by learning about the French Revolution and its consequences, as well as studying the contributions of Napoleon.

World History A Final Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Course Sets

  • ¥ World History (Basic, Standard, Honors)

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Glencoe World History: Modern Times

Workbook

  • ¥ World History Active Reading Note-Taking Guide

World History B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
The second of two courses, World History B starts with the Industrial Revolution and the social and technological changes that swept across Europe and North America. The advances and turmoil of the 20th century are studied in depth, and the course ends with the opportunities and challenges of today’s global networked society.

Units:

An Era of European Imperialism

In this unit, you will explore the causes and effects of European Imperialism between 1800 and 1914. You will examine how industrialization and nationalism influenced empire-building around the globe. In addition, you will learn about European colonies in Southeast Asia, Africa, India, and Latin America, and consider the consequences of imperialism on indigenous peoples. Finally, you will study social and political challenges in China and Japan in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

The Twentieth Century Crisis

In this unit, you will study social, political, and military struggles throughout the world between 1914 and 1945. You will examine the causes and effects of World War I, and study how the outcome of that world laid the foundation for a second world war. Additionally, you will study world cultural trends between the world wars. You will also explore the role of nationalism in the Middle East, Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Finally, you will learn about the reasons for and consequences of World War II.

Toward a Global Civilization

In this final unit of World History, you will learn about developments throughout the world between 1945 and the present. You will examine the causes and consequences of the Cold War and trace the influence of communism throughout the postwar world. You will also learn about the emergence of new economies and independent nations in Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Finally, you will consider the challenges facing the global civilization and how nations try to achieve peace.

World History B Final Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Course Sets

  • ¥ World History (Basic, Standard, Honors)

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Glencoe World History: Modern Times

Workbook

  • ¥ World History Active Reading Note-Taking Guide

Elective Courses

Career Exploration

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
From writing an effective resumé to giving the perfect interview and succeeding at a chosen career, this course introduces students to a broad scope of future career opportunities and outlines steps to ensure success. Students start planning their transition from secondary school to college to the workplace.

Units:

Career Exploration Introduction

Knowing the Plan

Getting to Know Yourself

Knowing What You Want

Getting to Know the Job Market

Getting Ready for a Career

Getting a Job

Keeping Your Career Going

Health, Fitness, and Nutrition A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
The benefits of nutrition and exercise are among the many health-related topics covered in this course. Students gain awareness of their own fitness level and nutritional needs through the study of the body’s musculature and respiratory system.

Units:

Unit 1

In this unit, you will learn about the different aspects of being fit and why these aspects are important. You will also learn factors that determine fitness but are out of your control. Various tests, components, and guidelines for exercise, joints, flexibility, stretching, and the mind-body connection are covered.

Unit 2

In this unit, you will study the anatomy of the heart and its relation to exercise and muscle strengthening. Aerobic training and the importance of training properly will also be discussed. You will discover why developing positive exercise habits at young age will help increase longevity and quality of life.

Final Exam

Health, Fitness, and Nutrition B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
In the second of two courses, students learn first aid, personal wellness, and the dangers of alcohol and drug use. Students learn how to adopt long-term, healthy habits and lifestyle changes to improve and inspire an overall state of well being. Students also explore how fitness can influence self image and how to develop social strategies to understand peer pressure.

Units:

Unit 1

Students will begin to explore the causes of obesity and the steps to prevent obesity and other diseases that arise from a sedentary lifestyle. You will learn about weight control and the different types of diets that are common today. You will also be able to detemine which diets can and cannot work. Stress and stress management will also be explored in this unit.

Unit 2

In this unit, you will learn about first aid, personal wellness, and the dangers of alcohol and drug use. Students will discover myths that surround exercise and identify ways to prevent injury while exercising. You will also explore how fitness can influence self image and how to develop and design a personal exercise program.

Final Exam

Personal Fitness

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
The lessons in Personal Fitness help students gain an understanding of the proper ways to exercise and diet, as well as learn how to assess their own fitness level. The course also teaches strategies to attain the highest possible fitness level.

Units:

Fitness Awareness and Understanding

In this unit, you will learn about the importance of fitness and be able to describe your fitness level. Topics covered include the five health-related factors and the six skill-related factors. You’ll be able to define and perform a series of fitness tests to evaluate a) cardiovascular fitness, b) body composition measurements, and c) body fat evaluation.You will also be able to explain the principles of overload, progression, and specificity. With this knowledge, you will learn how to plan your own exercise sessions, including the warm-up and cool down.Flexibility, the different kinds of joints, and how to apply principles to flexibility will also be covered.

Cardiovascular Fitness

In this unit, you will be able to define cardiovascular fitness, describe the functioning of the cardiovascular system, and will be familiar with the major structural features of the heart. You will learn about blood presure, the respiratory process, features of the lungs, benefits of aerobic exercise, the types of muscle fibers, how to deveop cardiovascular fitness and muscular strength and endurance, oxygen transport, how blood is carried, and body fat.

Nutrition

You will learn about the best food sources for the six major nutrients as well as the basic food groups to optimize your health benefits. Sports nutrition myths are debunked. Other topics include: hydration, weight control, fad diets, eating disorders, and the effect of stress.

Designing Your Personal Exercise Program

You will learn about common exercises and how to avoid injuries. You will learn how to track your progress and as well as how to reach specific goals. This program design will improve a) cardiovascular endurance, b) muscular strength and endurance, and c) promote positive changes in flexibility.

Physical Education

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This course places priority on self-motivated physical activities that students can participate in throughout life. Students’ proficiency in the activities most important for personal development are measured with written assignments, class evaluations, and demonstrated physical skill competencies.

Units:

Fitness

You will learn about the mechanics of several muscle specific stretches, the benefit of cardiovascular fitness, self-evaulations of personal fitness level, and proper technique and spotting for safe weight lifting.

Team Sports

In this unit, you will learn the rules and regulations of various team sports, including basketball, volleyball, softball, baseball, and soccer. You will also acquire the skills that accompany these activities.

Individual Sports

You will learn various activities that can be performed on your own that promote lifelong fitness. Included in the unit are lessons on hiking, swimming, and running, among other activities. You will gain an appreciation for fitness and how it contributes to a higher quality of life.

Final Exam

AP Art History A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This course is designed to provide college-level instruction in art history and prepares the student for the AP exam. The student will examine major forms of artistic expression from the past and present and from a variety of cultures. The student will learn to look at works of art critically, with intelligence and sensitivity, and to articulate what he sees or experiences.

Units:

Introduction to AP Art History

Unit 1 covers an introduction to AP Art History, course navigation, course features, College Board AP Art History Exam information, basic art vocabulary, how to understand a prompt, write a short or long response to a prompt and to learn how to interpret a floor plan.

The Art of the Ancient Near East and Ancient Egypt

Unit 2 covers major works of art and architecture from the Ancient Near East, Egypt, China, and Japan. Ancient Near East works of art and architecture that expressed power over nature, in civic life, and in the realm of the gods are explored. The use of a canon of style is examined and why it was temporarily abandoned during the time of Akhenaten. Common features in the early cultures of China and Japan are explored through a study of their art and architecture.

Art of Early Greece, Rome, Mesoamerica and South A

Unit 3 covers works of art from the Ancient Greece, Rome, Early South America and Early Mesoamerica. The art of early Aegean cultures and the Cycladic, Minoan, and Mycenaean civilizations are explored along with the art and architecture of ancient Greece from the Geometric through the Archaic periods. How the ancient Roman fused their own innovations with Greek artistic ideals to form a distinctly new style is discussed. The aesthetic and cultural differences between Western and non–Western civilizations are analyzed as early South American and Mesoamerican works of art are examined.

Early Christian, Byzantine, Islamic, Asian, and Me

Unit 4 covers Early Christian, Byzantine, Islamic, and Early Medieval works of art. How the imagery and styles of Early Christian art were influenced by earlier spiritual and artistic practices, as well as how the art from this time period drew on preceding artistic styles is investigated. How the art of the Byzantine Empire reflects its beliefs and values as a Christian society with Muslims and Jews existed within its framework is analyzed. How the art and architecture in the early Middle Ages reflected a synthesis of old Rome and a new, Christian focus is explored. The religious and international influences that affected the early art and architecture of Indian and Islamic cultures is investigated.

Romanesque, Gothic, Early African, and North Ameri

Unit 5 covers Romanesque, Gothic, Early African and North American works of art. How Romanesque churches were the beneficiaries of innovations in architecture as well as the influence of pilgrimage, the growth of the monastic orders, and the rise of powerful patrons is examined. The defining features of Gothic architecture—high, thin walls, large stained-glass windows, intricate ribbed vaulting, and pointed arches—which introduces the emergence of the early French Gothic style at Saint-Denis, Notre Dame, Laon, and Chartres is explored. How the concepts of the spiritual world, sociopolitical realities, and materials valued in Africa and the Americas differ from Western tradition is investigated.

AP Art History B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This course is designed to provide college-level instruction in art history and prepare the student for the AP exam. The student will examine major forms of artistic expression from the past and present and from a variety of cultures. The student will also learn to look at works of art critically, with intelligence and sensitivity, and to articulate what he sees or experiences.

Units:

14th and 15th Century Art in Italy and Northern Eu

Unit 1 covers 14th and 15th Century Italy, Northern Europe works of art and later works of art from South America and Mesoamerica. 14th century Italian art was a time of transition that included previous traditions and a revival of interest in the Greco–Roman past. 15th century Italian Renaissance art with its renewed interest in the natural world, changes in status of the artist, and issues of patronage is examined. The 15th century Northern Renaissance embodied an interest in observable subjects, in contrast to the Italian Renaissance that emulated Greco–Roman idealism. The concept that the Mesoamerican and South American cultures had no contact with one another and how each provides a unique world view is investigated.

16th Century Art in Italy and Northern Europe

Unit 2 covers 16th works of art in Italy, Northern Europe and Oceania. 16th century Italian art was the High Renaissance period which was characterized by an artistic emphasis on balance and reason. The great High Renaissance artists: Michelangelo, Raphael, and Leonardo da Vinci created works of art during this time. 16th century Northern European art showed a different economy and social structure that resulted in religious change which led to changes in the subjects of art and new sources of patronage. The art of Oceania is narrative conveying the history and tradition of the diverse cultures while sharing several commonalities.

17th and 18th Century Art

Unit 3 covers 17th and 18th century, Later Islamic and South Asian works of art. 17th century was commonly known as the Baroque period. Baroque art subjects were depicted with realism and drama. Landscape and still life were common subjects in Northern European works of art while religious subjects remained important in Italian, Flemish and Spanish works of art. 18th century art changes from the sensuously ornate Rococo style to the Neoclassical style which looked back to ancient Greece and Rome for inspiration. The later Islamic and South Asian works of art are often religious in nature and includes works of art from three major religions: Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism.

19th Century Art

Unit 4 covers art from the 19th Century and from Japan after 1336 and China after 1279. 19th century art covers many different styles of art such as Romanticism, influences of the Royal Academy of Arts and the Paris Salon, Realism, Impressionism, Postimpressionism, Symbolism, Art Nouveau and new trends in architecture. The invention of photography and its impact on art is examined. After 1885, the Postimpressionists tried new techniques and subjects in their art. The influence of Japanese art on 19th century art such as Impressionism and Postimpressionism is investigated along the study of later Chinese and Japanese works of art.

20th and 21st Century Art

Unit 5 covers 20th and 21th centuries works of art and Native North American works of art created after 1300 and African works of art created after 1800. Astounding scientific discoveries, technological breakthroughs, tumultuous political and social events all affected the artworks of the 20th century. Works of art reflected the horrors of WWI and WWII in a variety of ways. American Modernists sought to differentiate their art from that of Europeans, and New York became the new center of the international art world. The turbulent episodes in politics and society, including the Vietnam War, in the 1960s and 1970s led to extremes in artistic expression. Recent artists have revised definitions of art as they put old techniques to new uses and employed new materials and technologies to create art. North American tribes created ornate, beautiful and refined utilitarian objects. African tribes created religious, moral, and sacred objects; the aesthetic of their art was to be beautiful or fierce according to the spiritual reasons.

AP Spanish Language A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Spanish III

Description:
The main objective of the AP Spanish Language course is to develop the student’s interpersonal communication skills in Spanish and to prepare the the student for the AP Language examination. In this course, the student will develop a strong command of the Spanish language with proficiency in integrating language skills and synthesizing written and aural materials, the formal writing process, extensive interpersonal and presentational speaking and writing practice, and aural comprehension skills through quality, authentic, and level-appropriate audio and video recordings. This objective is achieved through highly engaging course content and interactive simulations, which gives the student ample opportunities throughout the course to integrate reading, writing, and speaking.

The student will be exposed to literature, historical, and current events of Spanish-speaking countries through authentic newspapers and magazines, music, movie, radio and television productions, literary texts, and virtual visits online.

Units:

AP Spanish – Introduction

Unit 1 is an introduction to the course, including navigation, user interface, assessments, and more.

Escuelas del Mundo

This unit deals with education: schools of the world, educational systems, extracurricular activities, standardized tests, academic integrity, and choosing the right college. You are also introduced to your first Mi Voz activity.

Introduccion a la literatura: El cuento y la poesi

Unit 3 deals with Literature and the arts. You will use a lot of comparison/contrast when dealing with the authors and artists.

La juventud y sus valores

Unit 4 deals with teen life and coming of age. Lives of teenagers are compared in the US, the Caribbean, Spain, Israel, Japan, and Latin American countries.

La tecnologia en el pasado

Unit 5 deals with technology, both in the US and in other countries. It also deals with technology in the future.

Historia de los medios de communicacion: Mexico y

Unit 6 deals with communication. The first lesson is about means of communication, followed by censorship of communication in China and the Arab countries, Hispanics in the US and their means of communication, publicity and communication and publicity and you. Unit 6 marks the end of Semester 1. There is a Unit 6 test, as well as a semester exam.

AP Spanish Language B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of AP Spanish Language A

Description:
The main objective of the AP Spanish Language course is to develop the student’s interpersonal communication skills in Spanish and to prepare the the student for the AP Language examination. In this course, the student will develop a strong command of the Spanish language with proficiency in integrating language skills and synthesizing written and aural materials, the formal writing process, extensive interpersonal and presentational speaking and writing practice, and aural comprehension skills through quality, authentic, and level-appropriate audio and video recordings. This objective is achieved through highly engaging course content and interactive simulations, which gives the student ample opportunities throughout the course to integrate reading, writing, and speaking.

The student will be exposed to literature, historical, and current events of Spanish-speaking countries through authentic newspapers and magazines, music, movie, radio and television productions, literary texts, and virtual visits online.

Units:

El medio ambiente en Espana y China

Global Environment is the theme of Unit 1. You will visit Spain, China, India, the US, and then recycling around the world and where you live.

La sociedad global

Unit 2 deals with global society and immigration. The unit starts by introducing what a global society is, then focuses on Spain. It is then tied to the US, and immigration is presented.

Las oportunidades de empleo en dos culturas

Unit 3 deals with employment and finances. The unit begins talking about the job market in other countries, and then focuses on the US. You will talk about how much money you dream of making, what to do to reach that dream, and then how to plan a budget.

El sistema de salud en dos culturas

Unit 4 deals with health. It talks about health care in the 3 countries, and then in the US. The final focus is on you and your health. This is the last unit of AP Spanish. There is a Unit 4 test, 2 practice AP exams, and the Semester Exam.

Art History A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
In Art History, students explore the basic elements and principles of art and its role in human history and the development of early cultures. Students look at how art impacted cultures from Paleolithic times to ancient Egypt, and explore the factors that affect the analysis and interpretation of art.

Units:

Journey Through Ancient Art History

This unit offers a foundation of the elements and principles of art and the knowledge of what to look for when the student critiques and explores various works of art. Creating art is an important part of experiencing life. It allows the student the opportunity to express himself in a unique form. It forces the student to seek out new ways to convey his thoughts and feelings to others. Studying the art that has been created by others helps the student to understand the thoughts and feelings that motivated them to create. It opens the student’s mind to the similarities and differences among cultures and societies.

Art at the Start: Early Civilization

Prehistoric Expression and Early Art and Architecture of the Fertile Crescent

This unit explores Prehistoric art as well as the art and architecture of the civilizations of the fertile crescent.

Historians usually consider works of art to be prehistoric if they were produced more than 5,000 years ago. This is the case with the works you will study in this unit. However, it is important to note that not all societies and cultures developed at the same time in history.

You will study the Sumerians who were responsible for the first forms of writing, law, a complex economy, irrigation methods, and singular expressions of art and architecture. The visual arts of the Sumerians were so influential that their legacy carried on in the cultures that followed: those of the Assyrians, the Babylonians, and the neo-Babylonians.

Egypt: Art on the Nile

Images of ancient Egypt abound in our imagination. The great treasures of the ancient world, such as the pyramids and the Sphinx, are instantly recognizable. In this particular unit, the student will begin by familiarizing himself with the geography and history of ancient Egypt. Then, the student will build a foundation of knowledge by getting an overview of the ancient art and architecture of this amazing civilization through the Old, Middle, and New Kingdoms.

Final Review and Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Art History B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
In Art History, students embark on a journey of discovery examining the artistic endeavors of early Western civilizations. Students use art theory to analyze works from ancient Greece and the Roman Empire. Students gain an enhanced understanding of ancient history, as well as how art is both a reflection and engine of history.

Units:

Greece: Gods and Glory

In this unit, you will discover the world of Ancient Greece and the many wonders that have stemmed from this civilization. Ancient Greece is such an integral part of our modern view of the world that we see the evidence nearly everywhere we look, in our institutions and civil organizations as well as behind our ideas about beauty in art and architecture. The distinguishing periods of the ancient Greek civilization: the Archaic, the Classical, and the Hellenistic, will also be explored.

You will also look at the architecture of Ancient Greece and understand how its different styles reflect the different periods of ancient Greek history. You will explore the individual buildings and temples of Ancient Greece, namely those found on the Acropolis, the “sacred hill.”

In the last lesson of the unit, the history and beauty of Greek pottery will be explored. More than mere containers, the vases, amphorae, and other ceramics of this culture were beautiful objects that often told stories, myths, and legends on their painted surfaces.

Ancient Rome: Art of an Empire

Unit 2 embarks on a journey toward understanding life and artistic developments in ancient Rome. Early Rome, during the Roman republic, sheds light on a driving desire for territorial expansion, military initiatives, an advantageous geographical position, and views on citizenship. These topics set the stage for a gaining a deeper insight into the people, culture, and artistic legacy of ancient Rome. You will learn that Roman portrait sculptures not only serve as beautiful art pieces, but also serve as models for learning artistic influences from other societies, individualized national innovation, and esteemed ideals and perspectives. The concluding lessons on Roman architecture will demonstrate Roman ingenuity in its purest and highest manifestation.

Final Review and Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Chinese I A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is a beginning level course that will introduce the student to a variety of areas of Mandarin Chinese. In this course, the student will learn listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a variety of activities. Throughout the five units, or themes, of material (introduction to Chinese, greetings, calendar, weather, and time), the student will learn to express himself using an ever-increasing vocabulary. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is presented throughout the course to help the learner focus on the Chinese-speaking world, people, geographical locations, and histories.

Units:

Greetings

Each unit consists of a variety of activities that are designed for you to meet certain standards. These standards are a part of the objectives listed for each unit. In Unit 1, you will learn how to greet people and exchange basic information like name and nationality in Chinese.

Family

Unit 2 deals with family. You will learn how to present your family members to your peers in Chinese. Each Unit also has a rubric for a “final performance” which tells you what to do in order to show you how you have met the standards for the Unit.

Friends

Unit 3 focuses on your understanding of the nature of language through comparisons of the language studied and your own. You will learn how to introduce your friend’s name, age, address and hobby in conversation while also presenting information and concepts on a variety of topics related to Chinese culture.

Time

Chinese festivals are a cultural spotlight for this unit along with teaching you how to express time in the Chinese language.

Chinese I B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Chinese I A

Description:
This is a beginning level course that will introduce the student to a variety of areas of Mandarin Chinese. In this course, the student will learn listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a variety of activities. Throughout the five units, or themes, of material (places, family, food, activities, and school), the student will learn to express himself using an ever-increasing vocabulary. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is presented throughout the course to help the learner focus on the Chinese-speaking world, people, geographical locations, and histories.

Units:

Clothes and Food

In this unit, you will learn how to describe people and things; how to state likes and dislikes; and how to communicate on the topics of food, drinks, colors, and clothes. Unit 1 also transitions from Semester 1 to Semester 2 in the course, beginning with a review of the topics in Semester 1.

Hobbies

In this unit, you will learn how to talk with somebody about hobbies, make an appointment, and ask directions properly in Chinese.

Art

In this unit, you will learn how to describe some art patterns and how to talk about film and art works. You will also learn a series of vocabulary which have something to do with arts. In “Visit China,” you will learn typical Chinese folk art like Chinese knot, paper cutting.

Business

Unit 8 is the last unit in the course. You will learn how to ask and describe price and brand and learn some famous company names in Chinese. You will also learn a series of vocabulary for currency.

Chinese II A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Chinese I A and I B

Description:
Chinese II enables the students to further develop the communicative skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing of Mandarin Chinese at a more advanced level. Students are immersed in Chinese culture as virtual exchange students in China. Virtual excursions from one Chinese city to another expand their vocabulary helping them learn to interact with others and use appropriate terms to communicate in various everyday situations.

Units:

School Life

In Unit 1, you will first complete a knowledge review from Chinese 1 to help them with the transition between the two courses. Then you will learn about different aspects related to school life such as ways to greet classmates or teachers, and how to describe a typical school schedule in Chinese. For the cultural lesson, you will study the differences between Chinese and U.S educational system, you will also learn about some historial sites in Beijing, China. You will also learn to write 20 Chinese characters that appear in this unit, and study 4 radicals and their origins and meanings.

Sports and Leisure Activities

Unit 2 focuses on sports and leisure activities. In this unit, you will learn the vocabulary of popular sports and leisure activities in China, ways to ask for directions or express personal opinions or feelings. You will also learn to discuss about sports injury and to use the word Zhengzai to express present tense. For the cultural lesson, you will learn about the Shaolin temple monks’ everyday ritals, and compare and contrast different styles of Chinese martial arts. You will have the opportunity to learn to write 20 Chinese characters that appear in the unit and study four radicals and their origins and meanings.

Careers

In Unit 3, you will learn to discuss about popular occupations in China. You will accumulate the vocabulary of different occupation titles and identify skills required for different occupations in Chinese. In addition, you will learn to discuss in Chinese the process of job hunting. For the cultural lesson, you will learn about and reflect on the importance of learning a foreign language in seeking employment and career choice. You will also learn to writer 20 Chinese characters that appear in this unit, and study 4 radicals and their origins and meanings.

Travel

Unit 4 focuses on the “four corners” in China. In this unit, you will learn to discuss travel arrangements such as transportation, weather, things to bring, and travel activities in Chinese. For the cultural lesson, you will learn about four beautiful cities in different regions of China and compare and contrast them with the four corners in the U.S. You will also learn to write 20 Chinese characters that appear in this unit and study 4 radicals and their origins and meanings.

Chinese II B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Chinese II A

Description:
Chinese II enables the students to further develop the communicative skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing of Mandarin Chinese at a more advanced level. Students are immersed in Chinese culture as virtual exchange students in China. Virtual excursions from one Chinese city to another expand their vocabulary helping them learn to interact with others and use appropriate terms to communicate in various everyday situations.

Units:

Places Where We Live

In Unit 1, Chinese architecture is discussed. You will learn new vocabulary and sentence structures used to describe various architectural formats and styles including Suzhou garden architecture, school architecture, as well as Feng Shui related to Chinese people’s general dwelling. For the culture lesson, you will learn about Feng Shui tips and traditions related to Chinese architecture. You will compare and contrast the Chinese and U.S. architecture styles. You will also learn to write 20 Chinese characters that appear in this unit and study 4 radicals and their origins and meanings.

Community and Celebrations

In Unit 2, you will study the vocabulary, sentence structures, and grammar points related to Chinese festivals and traditions. Several typical Chinese festivals are introduced including the moon festival and Chinese Valentines’s Day. For the cultural lesson, you will learn about the origins of several Chinese festivals and compare and contrast the Chinese festivals with your favorite western festivals. You will also learn to write 20 Chinese characters that appear in this unit, and study 4 radicals and their origins and meanings

Food and Clothes

Unit 3 is about food. In this unit, you will study ways to order in a restaurant using Chinese. You will also learn the vocabulary, sentence structure, and grammar points related to buying items in a supermarket. In addition, you will learn about being a guest in someone’s house. For the cultural lesson, you will study about some famous Chinese dishes or food items as well as their origins. You will also learn about traditions and etiquettes in Chinese banquets. You will also learn to write 20 Chinese characters that appear in this unit and study 4 radicals and their origins and meanings.

Art, Music, and Recreation

You will learn about art and music in China in Unit 4. In the beginning, you will study about an art form that is very popular in China – yu (jade). You will learn about different forms of jade arts, as well as the origins and traditions behind the jade. You will then learn about pop music in China, as well as the vocabulary, sentence structures, and grammar points related to Chinese pop music. For the cultural lesson, you will study and discuss the origin and tradition of jade ornament used as presents between family members. You will also learn to write 20 Chinese characters that appear in this unit and study 4 radicals and their origins and meanings.

Chinese III A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Chinese II

Description:
In Chinese III, the student will continue to expand his abilities in various aspects of Chinese Mandarin learning. The student will continue to build his knowledge in vocabulary, sentence patterns, and grammar points in communicative contexts. He will also enhance his Chinese Mandarin listening and speaking skills such as pronunciations and intonations. The student will learn more in-depth Chinese reading and writing strategies and skills. His Chinese reading abilities and efficiency will be greatly improved and will be able to write in Chinese in various formats such as a journal, letter, invitation, and an essay. The student’s knowledge and skills in writing simplified Chinese characters will also be enriched and fortified.

In this course, the student will learn more about the essential Chinese culture knowledge including the origins, histories, anecdotes, and etiquettes for various cultural settings, events, or occasions. He will also gain the ability to compare and contrast the Chinese culture with his own cultures in many different aspects.

Units:

Family and Friends

In Unit 1, you are going to learn about typical family structure. You will be working on an interactive family tree by completing it according to the audio prompts. Then you will study Chinese surnames and given names. You will learn the five most popular Chinese surnames, their meanings and origins. You are also required to choose a Chinese name and discuss about its meaning and origin, as well as other background information. Besides the two main topics, you will also learn about dating rituals, different ways to communicate, and expressions of love. You will be able to learn about the famous Chinese love story Liangzhu, and compare it with Romeo and Juliet. At the end of the unit, you will review the entire unit and take the unit exam.

Anatomy and Medicine

In this unit, you will focus on body parts and Chinese medicine. In the first lesson “Body Movements and Chinese Medicine”, you will study the five famous Chinese folk dances, and learn about terms for body movements. Then you will study typical Chinese herbal treatments that can help heal common illness such as cough or fever. In this unit, you are also exposed to some interesting Chinese medicine concepts such as homeopathic remedies, acupuncture, and diet treatment. In the end, you will also learn the special terms used by patients and doctors to describe pain and injury. At the end of the unit, you will review the entire unit and take the unit exam.

Li Bai Poetry

In this unit, you are taught the basic concepts about Chinese poetry. First you will be enaged by poems written by famous poets in Chinese history such as Li Bai, Du Fu, and Li Qing Zhao. You will then learn about the basic principles of writing a traditional Chinese poetry. You will also learn about th Dui’ou and Dui Zhang rules that are commonly used when writing a Chinese poem. You are required to write a Chinese poem by applying these rules. In addition, you will also compare and contrast Chinese folk songs and poetry. At the end of the unit, you will review the entire unit and take the unit exam.

Education and Community

In this unit, you are going to learn about college life. In the beginning, you will be introduced the college application process in China, and you will learn about the college life in China including the college course setup, everyday schedule, and about students’ leisure activitied in Chinese colleges. You will be required to create a college application of your own in Chinese after you have learned these lessons. In addition, you are going to study about Chinese college art festival and create a brochure for an art festival. Toward the end of the unit, parental influence on students are discussed, and you will learn about the alternatives to higher education in China. At the end of the unit, you will review the entire unit and take the unit exam.

Chinese III B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Chinese III A

Description:
In Chinese III, the student will continue to expand his abilities in various aspects of Chinese Mandarin learning. The student will continue to build his knowledge in vocabulary, sentence patterns, and grammar points in communicative contexts. He will also enhance his Chinese Mandarin listening and speaking skills such as pronunciations and intonations. The student will learn more in-depth Chinese reading and writing strategies and skills. His Chinese reading abilities and efficiency will be greatly improved and will be able to write in Chinese in various formats such as a journal, letter, invitation, and an essay. The student’s knowledge and skills in writing simplified Chinese characters will also be enriched and fortified.

In this course, the student will learn more about the essential Chinese culture knowledge including the origins, histories, anecdotes, and etiquettes for various cultural settings, events, or occasions. He will also gain the ability to compare and contrast the Chinese culture with his own cultures in many different aspects.

Units:

Environment and Health

This unit focuses on pollution and environment. You are going to learn about pollution in China and discuss about suggestions that can be made to help with the pollution situation in China. Then you will study the current affairs about recycling in China. A collaborative assessment is provided here for you to work with others as a group, to provide constructive suggestions for environment in China. Then reforestation is discussed, and you will learn about pandas and panda natural reserves. You will also study about environmental clubs and environmental art in China. You are also required to create an art piece from a recycyling item such as a coke cam. At the end of the unit, you will review the entire unit and take the unit exam.

Entertainment and Generations

In this unit, you are going to learn about popular activities from different points of view. You will learn how to communicate formally and informally. On grammar, you will learn how to express past, present, and future tenses in Chinese correctly. An interesting topic, Karaoke, will be discussed, and you are going to compare and contrast western and Chinese music, popular recreational activities, as well as Chinese and Western economics and their mutual impact. At the end of the unit, you will review the entire unit and take the unit exam.

Finding Work

This is a short unit but you are going to learn very useful knowledge about job hunting in China. You will learn about finding employment in China, and you will study useful tips to be used during job interviews. In addition, volunterrism in China is discussed. By studying this unit, you will realize the importance of learning Chinese in the modern society, to bring more job opportunities. At the end of the unit, you will review the entire unit and take the unit exam.

Digital Photography

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This course contains lessons in digital photography and graphic design. Students learn general photographic concepts and composition skills, elements of graphic design, and digital image-editing and special effects techniques. Students are introduced to the fields of photography, advertising, and illustration as possible career choices.

Units:

Photo Essentials

In this introductory unit, you will be given a basic overview of digital photography. You will learn how the composition of a photograph is defined by framing, the angle at which the photo was taken, and the photographer’s intended perspective. You will also learn how pixels and resolution determine file size and the quality of your photographs.

While completing this unit, you will be asked to take a photograph of an object from three different angles. You will also be asked to choose one of your photos and try different cropping techniques on it. Finally, you will experiment with saving photo files in specific file formats.

Exploring Color and Shape

In this unit you will explore color and shape with regard to digital photography. You will study the color wheel—defining primary, secondary, analogous, and complementary colors. In addition, you will explore saturation, value, and contrast, and you will complete activities on image adjustment and capturing different shapes in photographs.

At the end of the unit, you will complete a lesson on abstract art. You will learn that abstract art relies on shape, color, and brush stroke to convey a particular theme. You will be asked to use the GIMP image-editing program to create and save your own sample of abstract art.

Drawing with GIMP

In this unit, you will practice drawing in GIMP. You will learn how to use layers in drawings and how to create different effects with a variety of brush types. You will be asked to make a drawing from a photograph of your choice. This activity will show you just how creative you can be when experimenting with digital photography.

At the end of the unit, you will complete a lesson on pattern and texture. You will learn how different design programs can help you show depth and contrast in your work. You will be asked to identify patterns and textures in various objects and photographs. Finally, you will complete a lab, Creating a Desktop Tile, which will require your creativity.

Creating Special Effects

In this unit, you will be introduced to filters, or effects that can be applied to an image so that it is changed in unusual ways. You will explore a variety of special-effect filters in GIMP before completing the lab Adding Filters and Effects. You will also learn how to cut around a part of your image with the ellipse selection tool in GIMP.

At the end of the unit, you will complete the lab Experimenting with Filters. This lab will give you the opportunity to play with up to nine filters at once. By completing this lab, you will learn how the overuse of filters can completely distort an image.

Combining Images

In this unit you will learn how to make a composite image, or an image formed by combining two or more images to make a unified picture. You will be asked to use photographs of yourself and someone else to complete this activity. Next, you will complete the lab Creating a Double Exposure. In this lab you will learn how to combine two photographs to create a new photograph.

At the end of the unit, you will build your own panoramic picture. You will be asked to shoot a series of photos, which you will then combine to form a panorama in GIMP. Finally, you will use your imagination and creativity to create a visual hoax in GIMP.

Experimenting with Type Effects

In this unit, you will study typefaces, or fonts. You will experiment with type effects, including pattern overlays, filter effects, and perspective. In addition, you will learn how to use text effectively with font type, spacing, color, and positioning.

As part of this unit, you will complete the lab Creating Text Effects. In the lab you will experiment with different text-modifying tools in GIMP. You will find that you can change the mood of your chosen text in a variety of ways.

Building Your Portfolio

In this final unit you will begin to create your own portfolio. First, you will learn how to optimize your images for viewing, which means making your image file size as small as possible. Smaller file sizes take up less computer space. Next, you will learn how to create a web gallery of your photographs in the photo-sharing program Picasa.

At the end of the unit, you will be able to share your portfolio with your teacher, family, and friends.

French I A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
The goal of this course is to give the student basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through interesting and engaging activities. This course is organized into five topics including greetings, calendar, weather, time, and colors. The student will learn to talk about himself and other people, describe his surroundings, and use numbers for dates and times. The student will be introduced to regular verbs in the present tense and will practice simple grammatical structures in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is presented throughout the course to help the student understand the context of the language and the perspectives of the French-speaking world.

Units:

Bonjour

In this unit, students will learn to:

  1. 1. introduce themselves to someone and ask their name
  2. 2. ask how someone is
  3. 3. ask where someone lives
  4. 4. ask others for some basic information in real conversations
  5. 5. recognize and recite the French alphabet
  6. 6. spell words out loud using the French alphabet
  7. 7. use appropriate basic vocabulary to greet people at different times of the day
  8. 8. choose the right farewell for the situation
  9. 9. begin to learn about the complex nature of language
  10. 10. understand French culture and how it differs from others
  11. 11. recognize the contributions that French-speaking countries have made to the world

Le Jour et La Date

This unit covers the following:

  • ¥ talking about days of the week and months
  • ¥ expressing dates
  • ¥ expressing likes and dislikes
  • ¥ using subject pronouns
  • ¥ numbers from 1–31
  • ¥ cultural aspects

Le Temps

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. talk about the weather
  2. 2. talk about the seasons
  3. 3. convert degrees from the Fahrenheit scale to Centigrade and vice versa
  4. 4. express possession
  5. 5. learn the indefinite articles
  6. 6. manipulate regular -er verbs
  7. 7. talk about what to wear in various situations
  8. 8. learn about Switzerland

L’Heure

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. talk about places in a town
  2. 2. talk about things to do in school
  3. 3. talk about things people do at different places in a town
  4. 4. manipulate some irregular verbs
  5. 5. manipulate regular -ir and -re verbs
  6. 6. learn to ask yes/no and information questions
  7. 7. learn about French-speaking Canada

Les Couleurs

In this unit, students will learn:

  1. 1. to describe themselves and others using être and adjectives
  2. 2. to describe things using colors
  3. 3. that adjectives in French have different forms based on gender and number
  4. 4. that most adjectives in French are placed differently than in English
  5. 5. additional people nouns
  6. 6. how to talk about basic things that might be in a school, desk, or backpack
  7. 7. how to talk about their school day
  8. 8. about Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast)

Exam

This unit contains the Semester Exam

French I B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of French I A

Description:
The goal of this course is to continue to give the student basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a variety of activities. Throughout the course, the student will learn to talk about himself and other people, describe his surroundings, and use numbers for dates and times. The student will be introduced to irregular verbs in the present tense and will practice simple grammatical structures in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. In this course, the student will also begin to learn some complex grammar. Culture is presented throughout the course to help the student understand the context of the language and the perspectives of the French-speaking world.

Units:

Les Endroits

In this unit, students will learn to:

  1. 1. talk about their cities or towns
  2. 2. talk about additional stores or places in their towns
  3. 3. describe where things are in relation to other things in a town
  4. 4. talk about things they do, like to do, need to do, want to do, or have to do
  5. 5. talk more about cognates
  6. 6. research and gather information about Québec
  7. 7. understand more about cities in French-speaking countries

La Famille

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. talk about their family members
  2. 2. talk about family members birthdays and ages
  3. 3. review dates and numbers
  4. 4. investigate cultural practices in French families
  5. 5. learn possessive adjectives
  6. 6. research holidays in the French-speaking world
  7. 7. learn additional cognates
  8. 8. learn additional verbs and how they work in French

La Cuisine

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. talk about foods
  2. 2. learn to order food and converse in a restaurant
  3. 3. learn the partitive article in French
  4. 4. learn additional factors in making a sentence negative in French
  5. 5. learn about dining habits in the French-speaking world

Les Passetemps

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. talk about sports and leisure time activities in the French-speaking world
  2. 2. learn how to talk about what they like to do
  3. 3. learn the verb “jouer”
  4. 4. learn what activities they might be able to do in the French-speaking world
  5. 5. learn to talk about what games they like to play
  6. 6. learn to talk about how frequently they do activities
  7. 7. learn the stress pronouns and additional prepositions to use them with
  8. 8. learn additional cognate patterns

L’Ecole

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. talk about schools and school activities in the French-speaking world
  2. 2. learn to talk about their school day in more detail
  3. 3. learn to talk about their house
  4. 4. learn to talk about chores and responsibilities they have at home
  5. 5. learn to talk about their plans
  6. 6. review verb structures they have had in this year of French
  7. 7. learn additional cognate patterns

Semester Exam

This unit contains the Semester Exam

French II A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of French I

Description:
This course builds on the skills the student learned in French I. In this course, the student will be introduced to a variety of areas of language learning. The student will learn listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a variety of activities. This course is organized into five topics: daily routine, animals, hobbies, the body, and descriptions. Throughout this course, the student will learn to express himself using an ever increasing vocabulary, present-tense verbs, articles, and adjectives. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Elements of the French-speaking world and culture appear throughout the course, including people, geographical locations, and histories.

Units:

La Routine

In this unit, students will learn to:

  • ¥ talk about what they do in a typical day
  • ¥ review telling time
  • ¥ continue to develop conversational skills
  • ¥ learn about important geographical regions in France

Les Animaux

In this unit, students will:

  • ¥ learn to talk about farm animals
  • ¥ learn to talk about tropical forest animals
  • ¥ compare nouns
  • ¥ form the superlative in French
  • ¥ use demonstrative adjectives to talk about which things they prefer
  • ¥ learn additional cognate patterns
  • ¥ learn about Corsica, another of France’s regions

Les Distractions

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. talk about their hobbies
  2. 2. talk about sports and other pastimes
  3. 3. make comparison statements
  4. 4. make superlative statements
  5. 5. learn direct object pronouns and placement
  6. 6. study another of France’s regions

Le Corps

In this unit, students will:

talk about the body

talk about what different body parts do

talk about a doctor’s visit

talk about various illnesses

learn indirect object pronouns

begin to learn the preterit (past tense) verb forms

learn about the Midi-Pyrenées region in France

La Description

In this unit, students will:

describe themselves and others using être and adjectives

learn more of the past tense verbs in French

learn to use the passé composé with être

learn to talk about people’s nationalities

learn about the French region of Aquitaine

Semester Exam

This unit contains the Semester Exam

French II B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of French II A

Description:
This course is a continuation of French II A. The student will continue to be introduced to a variety of areas of language learning. In this course, the student will learn listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a variety of activities. This course is organized into five topics: house, shopping, entertainment, spare time, and travel. In this course, the student will learn to express himself using an ever increasing vocabulary, present-tense verbs, articles, and adjectives. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Elements of the French-speaking world and culture appear throughout the course, including people, geographical locations, and histories.

Units:

La Maison

In this unit, students will learn to:

  1. 1. talk about their house (rooms and furnishings)
  2. 2. learn additional expressions to talk about things that are happening now
  3. 3. learn additional cognate patterns
  4. 4. learn about homes in other countries
  5. 5. continue to develop conversational skills in French

Les Achats

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. learn to talk about shopping
  2. 2. compare things and people
  3. 3. talk about fashion
  4. 4. talk about their preferences
  5. 5. learn the numbers beyond one hundred
  6. 6. talk about activities that happened in the past
  7. 7. learn additional cognate patterns

Les Loisirs

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. talk about events they can go to
  2. 2. talk about eating at a restaurant
  3. 3. learn negative expressions
  4. 4. talk about things that they enjoy
  5. 5. talk about how frequently they do things
  6. 6. talk about when things happen (today, yesterday, tomorrow)

Le Temps Libre

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. talk about sports and other activities
  2. 2. learn additional expressions to talk about how they feel
  3. 3. learn additional cognate patterns
  4. 4. learn additional expressions to talk about who items belong to
  5. 5. talk about activities that happened in the past
  6. 6. talk about what hobbies or activities they like to do in their spare time

Le Transport

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. learn to talk about taking a trip internationally
  2. 2. plan an international trip
  3. 3. learn to ask about where things are located in a city
  4. 4. learn to talk about things that are going to happen in the near future
  5. 5. talk about things that happened in the past
  6. 6. talk about things you know and about people/places you are familiar with
  7. 7. learn additional false cognates
  8. 8. review telling time

Semester Exam

This unit contains Semester Exam

French III A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of French II

Description:
French III A is a continuation of the first two years of French instruction. The student will continue to improve his listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a variety of activities. The course is organized into five topics: feelings, transportation, work, countries, and the future. Throughout this course, the student will build on his previous French knowledge. The student will learn additional vocabulary, verb tenses, and grammatical structures that are appropriate to his level. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Exposure to the culture of France and other French-speaking countries can be found throughout the course in order to help the student understand French, which is a dynamic language that is used by millions of people throughout the world.

Units:

Les Sentiments

In this unit, students will learn:

  1. 1. Additional negative expressions
  2. 2. Adverbs used in negative expressions
  3. 3. New idiomatic expressions
  4. 4. New concepts with the Passé Composé
  5. 5. Cultural information about France
  6. 6. Talking about free-time activities
  7. 7. Describing people in more detail

Le Transport

In this unit, students will learn:

  1. 1. Formation of adverbs
  2. 2. Adverbs of place
  3. 3. Commands
  4. 4. Vocabulary about transportation
  5. 5. Cultural issues having to do with travel
  6. 6. The Michelin Guide
  7. 7. The Chunnel

Au Travail!

In this unit students will learn:

Interrogative pronouns

Pronouns with commands

Relative pronouns

Imperfect tense

Expressions of obligation

Les Pays et les Nationalités

In this unit, students will learn:

More on relative pronouns

When to use the passé composé or the imperfect

Interrogative pronouns

Vocabulary

Qui,Que, Quoi, Dont

The pronoun Y

L’Avenir

In this unit, students will learn to:

Pronoun en

Placement of pronouns

Vocabulary on the French Educational System

About Canada

How to write a letter

The future tense

The conditional tense

“Si” clauses

Semester Exam

This unit contains the Semester Exam

French III B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of French III A

Description:
French III B is a continuation of the first two and a half years of French instruction. The student will continue to sharpen his listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a variety of activities. This course is organized into five topics: health, home, measurement, professions, and my history. The student will learn to express himself using an ever-increasing vocabulary, verbs in various tenses, articles, and adjectives. The student will review all verb tenses, including present tense, past tense, future tense, conditional tense, the passive voice, imperative verbs, and more. The student will learn to use two-object pronouns and review grammar from previous French instruction. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Elements of the French-speaking world and culture appear throughout the course, including people, geographical locations, and histories. The student will also learn about the various countries where French is spoken.

Units:

La Santé

In this unit, students will be introduced to:

  1. 1. The health professions vocabulary
  2. 2. Vocabulary and expressions to talk about physical and mental health
  3. 3. Reflexive and reciprocal verbs
  4. 4. Speaking in the past tense review

La Maison

This unit covers the following:

  1. 1. Reviewing uses of “en”
  2. 2. Irregular verb vivre
  3. 3. Difference between vivre and habiter
  4. 4. Talking about your house and where things are located in your house; what things are used for in your house
  5. 5. Adverbs
  6. 6. Conditional
  7. 7. Command form
  8. 8. Comparative/Superlative

New concepts:

  1. 1. The conditional to express desire
  2. 2. The passive voice
  3. 3. Giving and understanding directions
  4. 4. Vocabulary about housing and related topics
  5. 5. Cultural and historical issues

Les Mesures

This unit covers the following:

  1. 1. Review of verb tenses
  2. 2. Review of numbers
  3. 3. Comparatives and superlatives
  4. 4. Causative faire
  5. 5. Expressions with faire
  6. 6. Cultural practices with regard to measuring distance, volume and weight

Les Professions

This unit covers the following:

  1. 1. Vocabulary related to working
  2. 2. Vocabulary related to education
  3. 3. Review of relative pronouns
  4. 4. Pronouns—how to ask and answer questions with pronouns.
  5. 5. Using prepositions with pronouns
  6. 6. Review of vocabulary related to weather and units of time

Mon Histoire Personnelle

This unit covers the following:

  1. 1. Vocabulary and expressions to talk about yourself
  2. 2. Expressions of time
  3. 3. The passive voice
  4. 4. Expressing quantities
  5. 5. A review of the pronouns y and en
  6. 6. A review of all the tenses learned so far
  7. 7. Talking about things you used to do
  8. 8. An overview of what the European Union is

Semester Exam

This unit contains the Semester Exam

French IV A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of French III

Description:
In the first semester, students cover present-tense verbs, past-tense verbs, future tense, conditional tense, subjunctive mood, articles, and adjectives while delving more deeply into French culture. This course, rich in authentic reading material, uses nativespeaker recordings to enrich culture, grammar, and vocabulary lessons.

Units:

Les Gens

In this unit, students will be introduced to:

  1. 1. French historical and cultural information
  2. 2. Additional family members they might wish to talk about
  3. 3. Irregular plural noun patterns
  4. 4. Irregular feminine adjective formations
  5. 5. Adjective and adverb placement
  6. 6. Cultural information about families and weddings
  7. 7. Well-known French-speaking personalities

La Realisation

In this unit, students will learn:

  1. 1. To explain about things they have accomplished
  2. 2. To talk about activities that involve uncertainty or doubt
  3. 3. To express what you want others to do, what they wish others would do, etc.
  4. 4. To express what others wish or want for them to do.
  5. 5. To gather information about a French-speaking city
  6. 6. Cultural and historical issues.

Les Desires

In this unit, students will be introduced to:

  1. 1. Talking about what their desires are
  2. 2. Talking about things they hope will happen

Les Activites

In this unit, students will review:

  1. 1. Talking about things they like to do in the outdoors
  2. 2. Talking about things they want others with do
  3. 3. Expressing that others want them to do certain things
  4. 4. Talking about things related to the outdoors and to cities in general

They will be introduced to:

  • ¥ How to talk about what has happened by a certain time

Les Fetes

In this unit, students will review:

  1. 1. How to talk about things that are happening
  2. 2. How to talk about things that will happen
  3. 3. How to talk about things that happened in the past
  4. 4. How to talk about dates and days

Students will be introduced to:

  1. 1. Special dates and holidays in the French-speaking world
  2. 2. How to talk about what will have happened by a certain time

Semester Exam

This unit contains the semester exam.

French IV B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of French IV A

Description:
In the second semester students continue to cover present-tense verbs, past-tense verbs, future tense, conditional tense, subjunctive mood, articles, and adjectives while delving more deeply into French culture. This course, rich in authentic reading material, uses nativespeaker recordings to enrich culture, grammar, and vocabulary lessons.

Units:

Possibilites

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. Review talking about the future and things that would happen (if other conditions were met)
  2. 2. Learn patterns in words
  3. 3. Analyze proverbs in French
  4. 4. Learn about France and their contributions, musically and artistically, to the French-speaking world

Le Passe

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. Use adverbs to talk about how frequently or how well they do things
  2. 2. Talk about their past and things that happened in the past

Students will be introduced to:

  1. 1. Verbs in the past tense that take on a special meaning
  2. 2. New proverbs in French
  3. 3. Additional suffix patterns that will help them expand their vocabulary in French
  4. 4. Additional food vocabulary

Les Arts

In this unit, students will learn to:

  1. 1. Learn to talk about what others have said
  2. 2. Learn about the fine arts in the French-speaking world
  3. 3. Review the correct sequencing of tenses for expressing thoughts in the past, present, and future
  4. 4. Learn additional proverbs or sayings that are well known in the French-speaking world and that will help them gain insight to the French thought process
  5. 5. Learn about artists, both contemporary and historic, of great significance
  6. 6. Learn to talk about other art forms and learn ways in which they relate to the French-speaking world

Maintenant

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. Learn vocabulary that will allow them to talk about electrical items that are very common in today’s world
  2. 2. Larn to talk about actions that happen that were not planned
  3. 3. Review irregular verbs in French in order to be able to use them in conversation
  4. 4. Learn shortcuts in order to be able to use colloquial expressions instead of always using the noun
  5. 5. Learn additional idioms and sayings in French and learn to analyze them for understanding
  6. 6. Sharpen listening skills

C’est Fini!

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. Review talking about happenings in the past, present, and future
  2. 2. Review “shortcuts” for talking about others using a variety of pronouns
  3. 3. Review ways to talk about how they do things
  4. 4. Learn of additional writers important to the French, both contemporary and historical
  5. 5. Learn of additional traditions that are important to the French-speaking world

Semester Exam

This unit contains the Semester Exam

German I A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This is a beginning level course that will introduce the student to a variety of areas of language learning. In this course, the student will learn listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a variety of activities. Throughout the five units, or themes, of material (greetings, the date, weather, time, and colors), the student will learn to express himself using an ever-increasing vocabulary, present-tense verbs, articles, and adjectives. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is presented throughout the course to help the learner focus on the German-speaking world, people, geographical locations, and histories.

Units:

Die Grüße

Understanding the German language and culture offers great opportunities for appreciating art, history, and science. In this unit, you will learn and recite the German alphabet, respond appropriately to good and bad news regarding various topics, greet, ask where others are from, and bid farewell in written German.

Der Kalender

Learning the basics of any language is essential to communicating effectively. In this unit, you will learn the days of the week, numbers, and dates in German. You will examine calendars and participate in activities that require you to write, recite, and discuss.

Das Wetter

The climate of German-speaking countries and the climate in the United States are similar. In this unit, you will examine the weather in these two countries. You will also learn how to discuss your likes and dislikes and use interrogatives and conjugating verbs.

Die Uhrzeit

For centuries, the Swiss have been known for their strong, independent national identity, the great care they put into producing quality products, and the rugged breathtaking landscape known as the Swiss Alps. In this unit, you will use the location and time vocabulary that you have learned to provide and obtain information, present information about everyday activities, and solve and explain solutions to simple math problems orally.

Die Farben

In this unit, you will be taking a closer look at the German school system, school supplies, and school subjects. You will learn new adjectives to describe items, colors, and cognates. You will also identify, discuss, and analyze themes, ideas, and perspectives related to cultural products.

Semester Exam

This unit contains the semester exam for German I A

German I B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of German I A

Description:
German I B is the second semester of a beginning level course that will introduce the student to a variety of areas of language learning. In this course, the student will learn listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a variety of activities. Throughout the five units, or themes, of material (city, family, food, leisure time, and school and chores), the student will learn to express himself using an ever-increasing vocabulary, present-tense verbs, articles, and adjectives. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is presented throughout the course to help the learner focus on the German-speaking world, people, geographical locations, and histories.

Units:

Die Stadt

This unit will present you with vocabulary and skills which are essential for understanding and communicating in authentic German. In this unit you will compare living in the city versus the country, express living preferences and desires, obligations, and abilities. You will also learn about the Austrian culture and its parallels and differences to the United States.

Die Familie

In this unit you will learn about German culture and history, by creating a family tree and comparing our shared national history. You will also learn how to express family information, including relationships and birthdays through writing and speaking.

Das Essen

There are many types of foods and preferred meals in the world. In this Unit, you will be exploring what mealtimes and food consist of in Germany’s Black Forest. You will learn new vocabulary that will help you describe these foods and the culture of the Black Forest.

Die Freizeit

There are many different types of leisure activities and most vary from one culture to the next. In this unit, you will learn what German speakers enjoy doing in their free time. You will also share your own leisure activities and compare the cultural similarities and differences.

Die Schule und Pflichten

In this unit, you will study the German school system. You will identify common school objects that all cultures recognize. Then you will compare and contrast cultural similarities and differences between German and American schools and create a school schedule that showcases the similarities and differences.

Semester Exam

This unit contains the semester exam for German I B

German II A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of German I A and I B

Description:
German II A is an intermediate level course that will introduce the student to a variety of areas of language learning. In this course, the student will continue to learn listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a variety of activities. Throughout the five units, or themes, of material (daily routine, animals, pastimes, the body, and descriptions), the student will learn to express himself using an ever-increasing vocabulary, past-tense verbs, demonstrative articles, and adjectives. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is presented throughout the course to help the learner focus on the German-speaking world, people, geographical locations, and histories.

Units:

Der Tagesablauf

In this unit, you will review German vocabulary and grammar structures and will talk about daily routines in German. You will learn how to introduce yourself in German, use reflexive verbs to describe daily activities, and tell and ask time. Then you will explore Bavarian culture through reading and discussion activities.

Die Tiere

You will cover three major topics throughout this unit including German vocabulary for animals, describe various animal features, and the comparative forms of adjectives to communicate about caring for pets. Then you will learn how to use the correct negative forms of words depending on its sentence structure, and you will also adjust demonstrative articles according to case. Finally, you will learn about the development of the German capital and common expressions that people use Berlin.

Die Freizeit

In this unit, you will explore sports and pastimes enjoyed by German people and engage in conversations about your own hobbies and interests. You will also learn how to make comparison and superlative statements, proper placement of direct object pronouns in a sentence, and use the future tense of the verb to describe upcoming plans.

Der Körper

In this unit, you will learn German vocabulary for the parts of the body. You will explore common expressions that people use for the different parts of the body using indirect object pronouns. Then, you will learn how to report and describe physical complaints or illnesses to a doctor.

Die Beschreibung

In this unit, you will practice and review how to describe people’s nationalities and learn the German names for many of their fellow European Union member countries. You will also learn how to describe yourself and others using “sein” and adjectives, obtain and present information about people’s nationalities and use verbs of motion in the past tense.

Semester Exam

In this unit, you will prepare for and take the semester exam.

German II B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of German II A

Description:
This course is a continuation of German II A. In this course, the student will continue to learn listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a variety of activities. Throughout the five units, or themes, of material (house, shopping, leisure, travel destinations, and flying), the student will learn to express himself using an ever-increasing vocabulary, past-tense verbs, dative expressions, and adjectives. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is presented throughout the course to help the learner focus on the German-speaking world, people, geographical locations, and histories.

Units:

Das Haus

The focus of this unit is on the home. You will learn new vocabulary for the rooms of a house and the types of furnishings that can be found within each room. In addition, you will learn about the differences between homes in German-speaking countries and other countries throughout the world. By the end of the unit, you will discuss events in the past, explore cognate patterns, and learn more about prepositions.

Das Einkaufen

In this unit, you will go shopping. You will use numbers greater than 100 to understand prices of items and practice your German by asking for and understanding information as it related to shopping for various items. You will also compare the shopping habits between Germans and Americans, explore European currency, and learn more about Germany’s largest department store.

Die Freizeit Angebot

You will learn about leisure activities in Germany in this unit including sports, entertainment, and food. You will learn new vocabulary throughout the unit, and you will continue to expand your grammar skills in German. You will practice German using more past terms, adjective and adverbial phrases of time, and negative responses to various questions.

Reiseziele

In this unit, you will explore various modes of transportation. In particular, you will learn that the most common transportation method is by train. You will also learn new German vocabulary for traveling and camping. By the end of the unit, you will be able to demonstrate your understanding of dependent clauses, use indirect questions, and give commands.

Flugreisen

You will continue your study German by exploring air travel as a mode of transportation. You will continue to build on your German vocabulary and grammar skills by using terms related to travel, airports, and other methods of public transportation. You will also learn about the economic importance of Airport Frankfurt Hahn in Frankfurt, Germany, which is the third busiest international airport in Europe.

Semester Exam

In this unit, you will prepare for and take the semester exam.

German III A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of German II A and II B

Description:
German III A is a continuation of the first two years of German instruction. In this course, the student will continue to learn and practice successful communication through speaking, writing, reading, and listening. Throughout the five units, or themes, of material (Die GefÜhle, Der Verkehr, Bei der Arbeit, Land und Leute, and Die Zukunft), the student will learn to express himself using an ever-increasing vocabulary, present-tense verbs, articles, and adjectives. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is presented throughout the course to help the learner focus on the German-speaking world, people, geographical locations, and histories.

Units:

Ferien

Germans are among some of the most traveled people in the world. When provided the opportunity to get away, most Germans take off for places all over the world. Even within Germany’s borders, the places to visit are abundant. In this unit, you will explore vacation destinations in Germany, discuss leisure activities, learn new vocabulary, and keep a travel log.

Gesund Leben

In this unit, you will learn about Kurort’s or “towns with a health resort and spa.” Baden-Baden, Germany is known across Europe as a premier place to come to relax and tend to one’s overall health. You will examine the culture of Baden-Baden through reading, discussion, and writing activities.

Rechte und Pflichten

In this unit, you will learn about the German school system and its requirements for graduation. Throughout the unit, you will also examine the rights and responsibilities of 18-year-olds; the Abitur, which is similar to an associate’s degree; Gymnasium, or high school, studies; and miliary and civilian service professions.

Miteinander Leben

Relationships between and among people and countries are very important. In this unit, you will lean how to talk about relationships. In addition, you will explore friendships, fashions and trends, and the culture that existed between East and West Germany.

Märchen

Most Americans think of fairy tales when they hear a mention of the Grimm Brothers. However, many German speakers think not only of the Kinder- und Hausmärchen, but they also think of the major contributions to scholarly work that these two men made as well as their devotion to democracy and the preservation of the German culture. In this unit, you will learn about the brothers and the fairy tales that have been made famous by them.

Semester Exam

In this unit, you will prepare for and take the semester exam.

German III B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of German III A

Description:
This course is a continuation of German III A. In this course, the student will continue to learn and practice successful communication through speaking, writing, reading, and listening. This course presents material according to a specific theme, and the student will learn to express himself through a variety of activities using his ever-increasing vocabulary and grammar knowledge. Culture is presented throughout the course to help the learner focus on the German-speaking world, people, geographical locations, and histories.

Units:

Medien

Movies, television, newspapers, and magazines transcend the entire world. In this unit, you will learn vocabulary that is used when talking about media and how media affects culture in German-speaking countries. You will also explore the use of propaganda in German media.

Meine Kindheit

People often reminisce about their childhood memories. In this unit, you will learn how to talk about the events that happened during your childhood. You will also read short selections and learn about Franz Marc, Haribo, Diddl, Ligretto, and other aspects and figures of German pop culture.

Meine Zukunft

Students in Germany may attend university for various studies, or they may begin an occupation after high school. In this unit, you will learn more about university and vocational options for German students. You will also learn the vocabulary that is used when talking about occupations and review relative pronouns.

Guten Appetit

Food is at the center of many cultures, and German culture is not an exception. In this unit, you will explore various items relating to food. You will learn how read German menus and recipes in German cookbooks. You will also learn about the vocabulary that is used when talking about restaurants and cooking, review adjective endings, and practice using the subjunctive to make polite requests.

Die Umwelt

Understanding the problems that involve the environment and taking care of it is the focus of this unit. You will learn about the environment in Germany, the problems of the environment there, and any possible solutions. You will also learn new vocabulary that is related to the environment and how to form and use the past tense of the passive.

Semester Exam

In this unit, you will prepare for and take the semester exam.

Japanese I A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
In today’s business world, learning Japanese can be extremely valuable. In the first semester, this course focuses on spoken and written Japanese, with a thorough grounding in Japanese culture. Using warm-up activities, reading, vocabulary studies, games, and multimedia presentations, students gain the foundation to communicate successfully in Japanese.

Units:

Greetings

In this unit, students will learn to:

  1. 1. introduce themselves to someone and ask their name
  2. 2. ask how someone is
  3. 3. ask where someone lives
  4. 4. ask some basic information from others in real conversations
  5. 5. recognize and recite hiragana , one of the Japanese phonetic characters
  6. 6. spell words using hiragana
  7. 7. use appropriate basic vocabulary for greeting people at different times of day
  8. 8. choose a farewell appropriate in various situations
  9. 9. begin to learn about the complex nature of language
  10. 10. investigate the Japanese culture and how it differs from theirs with regard to talking to an individual
  11. 11. begin to realize the contributions that Japanese have made to world culture

Calendar

In this unit, students will learn to:

  1. 1. talk about the day of the week
  2. 2. learn the numbers 0–31
  3. 3. talk about the date
  4. 4. talk about what things they like to do on different days
  5. 5. talk about their birthdays
  6. 6. learn about several cultural aspects of Japan
  7. 7. learn about additional hiragana characters and sounds
  8. 8. learn to identify someone or something
  9. 9. learn to ask yes or no questions

Time

In this unit, studentswill:

  1. 1. talk about time
  2. 2. talk about places in a town
  3. 3. talk about things to do in school
  4. 4. talk about things students do at different places in town
  5. 5. learn to ask yes/no and information questions
  6. 6. learn more numbers, up to 100
  7. 7. learn about an old capital city of Japan, Kyoto
  8. 8. learn to give feedback in communication
  9. 9. practice typing in hiragana

Colors

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. describe themselves and others using adjectives
  2. 2. learn to describe things using colors
  3. 3. learn how to talk about basic things that might be in a school, desk, or backpack
  4. 4. learn how to talk about their school day
  5. 5. learn how to talk about what you like or dislike
  6. 6. learn katakana

Places

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. talk about their own cities or towns
  2. 2. talk about stores or places in their towns
  3. 3. describe where things are in relation to other things in their town
  4. 4. talk about things they do or are doing, like and dislike to do, or want to do
  5. 5. review katakana

Semester Exam

This unit contains the Semester Exam

Japanese I B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Japanese I A

Description:
In today’s business world, learning Japanese can be extremely valuable. In the second semester students continue to focus on spoken and written Japanese, with a thorough grounding in Japanese culture. Using warm-up activities, reading, vocabulary studies, games, and multimedia presentations, students gain the foundation to communicate successfully in Japanese.

Units:

Family

In this unit students will:

  1. 1. talk about family members
  2. 2. talk about family members’ birthdays and ages
  3. 3. review dates and numbers
  4. 4. learn the dictionary forms of verbs
  5. 5. investigate cultural practices in Japanese families
  6. 6. start to read and write kanji

Weather

In this unit, you will learn the following:

1. talk about the weather

2. talk about the seasons

3. convert degrees from the Fahrenheit scale to Centigrade and vice versa

4. talk about what to wear in various situations

5. talk about what they like to do

6. learn new kanji

Food

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. talk about foods
  2. 2. learn to order food and converse in a restaurant
  3. 3. learn about a verb form, so called “?form” of verbs
  4. 4. learn expressions to make requests using ??form
  5. 5. learn about dining habits in Japan

Pastime

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. talk about sports and leisure time activities in Japan
  2. 2. learn how to talk about what they like to do
  3. 3. learn how to talk about what they do well
  4. 4. learn how to invite someone for some activities
  5. 5. learn how to make a phone call

School

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. talk about schools and school activities in Japan
  2. 2. learn to talk about their school day in more detail
  3. 3. learn to talk about their houses
  4. 4. learn to talk about chores and responsibilities they have at home
  5. 5. learn to talk about their plans
  6. 6. review verb structures they have had in this year of Japanese

Semester Exam

This unit contains the Semester Exam

Japanese II A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Japanese I

Description:
In the first semester, students practice listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills as they express themselves using new vocabulary, present-tense verbs, and adjectives. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is sprinkled throughout the course as learners focus on the people, lifestyle, geography, and history of Japan.

Units:

Daily Life

In thsi unit, students will learn to:

  1. 1. Review Japanese sounds, Hiragana and Katakana
  2. 2. Review introducing themselves
  3. 3. Review verbs
  4. 4. Talk about what they do in a typical day
  5. 5. Review numbers 1–100
  6. 6. Review telling time
  7. 7. Continue to develop conversational skills
  8. 8. Learn more about the history of Japan

Animals

In this unit, students will:

Learn to talk about domestic animals

Learn to talk about many other animals

Compare nouns

Use demonstrative adjectives to talk about which things they prefer

Learn about different musical styles in Japan

Learn the present progressive in Japanese

Activities

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. Talk about hobbies
  2. 2. Talk about sports and other pastime activities
  3. 3. Make comparison statements
  4. 4. Make superlative statements
  5. 5. Study art from Japan and Japanese artists
  6. 6. Talk about things they like to do (Noun / Dictionary Form of Verb???????shy;???)
  7. 7. Talk about preferences and desires??Pre-MASU form of Verb + ?????Noun ?????????
  8. 8. Talk about plans (Dictionary Form of Verb +?????)

The Body

In this unit, students will:

1. Talk about the body

2. Talk about what different body parts

3. Talk about a doctor’s visit

4. Talk about various illnesses

5. Begin to learn past tense verb forms

Descriptions

In this unit, students will:

1. Describe themselves and others using I-adjective and NA-adjective

2. Describe themselves and others using a Noun and ??

3. Learn more of the past tense verbs in Japanese.

4. Learn to talk about people’s nationalities

5. Learn about how to quote

6. Learn about some of famous sites in Japan

7. Learn about Japanese poet Kenji Miyazawa

Semester Exam

This unit contains the Semester Exam

Japanese II B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Japanese II A

Description:
In the second semester students continue to practice listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills as they express themselves using new vocabulary, present-tense verbs, and adjectives. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is sprinkled throughout the course as learners focus on the people, lifestyle, geography, and history of Japan.

Units:

House

In this unit, students will learn to:

  1. 1. Talk about their homes (rooms and furnishings)
  2. 2. Talk about activities that happened in the past
  3. 3. Learn about homes in Japan
  4. 4. Continue to develop conversational skills in Japanese

Shopping

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. Learn to talk about shopping
  2. 2. Learn to shop at Japanese stores
  3. 3. Compare items in Japanese
  4. 4. Talk about fashions
  5. 5. Talk about their preferences
  6. 6. Learn to use the numbers beyond 100 in conversational Japanese and especially when dealing with shopping
  7. 7. Practice talking about activities that happened in the past

Entertainment

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. Talk about events they can go to for entertainment
  2. 2. Talk about eating at a restaurant
  3. 3. Learn to make negative responses in answering questions
  4. 4. Learn to talk about things they love or like
  5. 5. Talk about how frequently they do things
  6. 6. Talk about when things happen (today, yesterday, tomorrow)

Spare Time

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. Talk about sports and other activities
  2. 2. Learn expressions to talk about feelings they are experiencing
  3. 3. Learn to talk about to whom things belong
  4. 4. Review talking about activities in the past
  5. 5. Talk about what hobbies or activities they like to do in their spare time

Travel

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. Learn to talk about taking a trip internationally
  2. 2. Plan an international trip
  3. 3. Learn to ask about where things are located in a city
  4. 4. Express activities that are going to happen in the near future
  5. 5. Talk about activities that happened in the past
  6. 6. Talk about things you know and people or places you are familiar with
  7. 7. Learn additional false cognates
  8. 8. Review telling time

Semester Exam

This unit contains the Semester Exam

Latin I A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
You will be building a Roman Information Highway—the Via Latina. You will be the builder, or aedificator. The building blocks for this Roman road will include the following: 1) laying the foundation of bedrock comprised of Latin grammatical structures; 2) cementing the layers of rock together with the mortar – new Latin vocabulary; 3) fitting the top layer of cobblestones together for a smooth translation into English of Latin stories and sentences; 4) connecting your new road to other paths through words and customs derived from Latin and the Romans; and finally, 5) stopping at the rest stops along the road to learn more about Roman culture and daily life.Unit 1 covers grammar basics, the nominative and accusative cases, 1st declension, 1st conjugation, the present active tense and the present tense of sum. Unit 2 covers the genitive, dative and ablative cases, and the imperfect and future tenses of sum. Unit 3 covers 2nd declension nouns, ablative of means, vocatives, imperatives, the perfect active system, and the perfect system of sum. Unit 4 covers 2nd conjugation, infinitives, 1st and 2nd declension adjectives. Unit 4 also contains both parts of the Semester 1 Exam. Numerous cultural lessons are scattered throughout each Unit.

Units:

Unit 1

Lucia, Pausanias and Magister Grammaticus will guide you through the entire course.

Unit 2

Lucia’s presence indicates there is new vocabulary to learn.

Unit 3

Magister Grammaticus indicates that there are grammar rules to learn. You will usually want to print the information on these pages.

Unit 4

In this unit, you will learn about Roman culture through their education system. You will also increase knowledge of your own language by understanding elements of Latin.

Latin I B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
You will be building a Roman Information Highway—the Via Latina. You will be the builder, or aedificator. The building blocks for this Roman road will include the following: 1) laying the foundation of bedrock comprised of Latin grammatical structures; 2) cementing the layers of rock together with the mortar – new Latin vocabulary; 3) fitting the top layer of cobblestones together for a smooth translation into English of Latin stories and sentences; 4) connecting your new road to other paths through words and customs derived from Latin and the Romans; and finally, 5) stopping at the rest stops along the road to learn more about Roman culture and daily life.

Unit 1 covers the present passive system, the ablative of agent, -er adjectives, questions, and adverbs. Unit 2 covers the perfect passive system and appositive. Unit 3 covers 3rd conjugation and Latin idioms. Unit 4 covers 4th conjugation and personal pronouns. Unit 5 contains a comprehensive review of the entire course, as well as both parts of the Semester 2 Exam.Numerous cultural lessons are scattered throughout each Unit.

Units:

Unit 1

Pausanias indicates that you will learn about Roman culture .

Unit 2

You will learn about perspectives of the Roman culture through myths in the Roman calendar. You will also learn more about your own language through connectors, appositives and idioms in Latin.

Unit 3

You will read famous epic the Aeneid, learn about third conjugation and continue increasing their vocabulary.

Unit 4

Tempus fugit! Time flies! The final unit of the course is here! You will continue studying Latin grammar, as well as interview people for the Latin Lives! assessment.

Optional Semester 2 Exam Review

In this optional unit, you will have the chance to review nouns, adjectives, verbs, culture and Vergil before taking the Semester 2 Exam.

Latin II A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
In this course, the student will build on his knowledge of Latin grammar and vocabulary and gain a solid foundation in the structure of language, as well as an understanding of the life and times of ancient Romans. The student will learn to appreciate how Roman engineering, art, commerce, and law were all supported by a clear, expressive, and flexible language.

Units:

Act I: Monsters, Inc.

Now, ab ovo usque ad mala…from soup to nuts… let’s begin our study of the individual units.

In this unit, you will review first year grammar, the third declension, and relative pronouns. You will also learn about a classical hero, common Latin roots and derivatives, epic Conventions, mottoes and abbreviations.

Call of the Wild

This unit continues with more information about the third declension and also Sum and Possum. You will learn about The Odyssey along with derivatives of Latin words.

The Castaway

Unit 3 builds on what was learned in unit 2. You will continue with more third declension work along with further readings from The Odyssey, and more on derivatives. The study of The Odyssey comes to an end with “Ad Ithacam.”

The Twins

You will study pronouns and the 4th and 5th Declensions. You will begin your instruction on Roman history, learning about the history of the monarchy and geography. Finally, you will continue your work on derivatives.

Latin II B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
You will continue your journey to the time of the ancient Romans, but this time you will be a film student in the Roman movie, An Epic of Great Proportion. You will be the director, your script will include visits with some of the men who made Rome great. You will learn about the Roman government and how Rome grew to rule most of the known world. This epic movie will also take you back to the Trojan War where you will accompany the Greeks on a great adventure. In Unit 1 you will learn about participles and ablative absolutes. You will then continue your discussion of Roman history focusing on the beginnings of the Republic. You will also review quotes and continue working on derivatives.Unit 2 has a considerable amount of culture/history. Much happened during the Republic! Caesar; the Roman army; famous battles; mottoes and abbreviations pertinent to the times; Cincinnatus; and Regulus are covered.Unit 3 contains the study of the Empire. You will look at various emperors and the factors that caused the demise of the empire. This unit is an anomaly since it has no translation story in it. The reason is that it contains what we think is the hardest grammar concept in the course, i.e. indirect statement. The heavy dose of history in this module gives you a break from the heavy dose of grammar.Unit 4 we ask you to apply the mythological stories to your own lives.Unit 5 is one of review. There are no assignments. You will find appendix links, rollovers, concentration games, practice sites, self-drill opportunities and matching games with which to review the course material and to prepare for the final exams. You may take as much time as necessary with these and use them as often as needed before taking the exams in Unit 4.

Units:

King of Kings

In this unit, you will learn about participles and ablative absolutes. You continue your discussion of Roman history focussing on the beginnings of the Republic. You will also review quotes and continue working on derivatives.

Arms and the Man

This unit has a considerable amount of culture/history. Much happened during the Republic! Caesar, the Roman army, famous battles, mottoes and abbreviations pertinent to the times, Cincinnatus and Regulus are covered.

Silent Movie

Unit 3 contains the study of the Empire. You will look at various emperors and the factors that caused the demise of the empire.

This unit is also an anomaly since it has no translation story in it. The reason is that it contains what we think is the hardest grammar concept in the course, i.e. Indirect Statement. The heavy dose of history in this unit gives you a break from the heavy dose of grammar.

Goldfinger

In this unit, you will apply the mythological stories to your own lives.

Metamorphoses

This entire unit is one of review. There are no assessments.

You will find appendix links, rollovers, concentration games, practice sites, self-drill opportunities and matching games with which to review the course material and to prepare for the final exams. You may take as much time as necessary with these and use them as often as needed before taking the exams in Unit 4.

Latin III A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
In this course, the student will expand his knowledge of Latin by exploring prose written and spoken by Roman figures, such as Caesar, Cicero, and Catullus. Through exposure to authentic texts, the student will strengthen vocabulary and gain an understanding and appreciation of well-crafted writing.

Units:

Checking In

Julius Caesar Collection

Marcus Tullius Cicero Collection

Latin III B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
In this course, the student will continue to explore advanced Latin. He will read Latin passages and scan poetic meter as he analyzes the writing style and content of Catullus and Vergil. The student will continue to demonstrate knowledge of Latin through oral reading, essay writing, and translation activities.

Units:

Checking In

Poetae Collection

Tantae molis erat Romanam condere gentem

O tergue quaterque beati!

Music Appreciation

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
Students take a musical journey through time as they explore the major styles, influences, and personalities that shaped Western culture’s musical landscape. Students study music and culture from the classical, Renaissance, and baroque periods, as well as modern, 20th century, and contemporary music.

Units:

Music Elements

Music Time Periods

Musical Instruments

Listening

Sign Language I A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
In this course, students are introduced to the fundamental concepts of American Sign Language. Students explore vocabulary, grammar, and conversational skills using basic signing and fingerspelling techniques, and are exposed to activities and exercises that help them understand the culture of deaf and hard-of-hearing people.

Units:

Intro

In this unit, your student will be introduced to American Sign Language, or ASL. He will study the history of ASL and learn how it became the standard language for deaf and hard of hearing people in North America. He will also learn about some of the accepted rules of etiquette in Deaf culture. This introductory unit also teaches your student how to sign the letters of the alphabet and the mechanics of fingerspelling.

Numbers

This unit introduces the signing of numbers. Your student will learn how to sign numbers 1–100, as well as the signs for dollars and cents. A variety of fun activities give your student a chance to practice using ASL to discuss counting and using money.

Time

In this unit, your student will study various aspects of time. Not only will he learn how to communicate time using ASL, he will also learn the signs for the 7 days of the week and the 12 months of the year. The signs for various holidays as well as the four seasons are also taught in this unit.

Nouns

Your student will learn the signs for some commonly used nouns and pronouns. She will also be introduced to the ASL concepts of Indexing, Agency, and Nonmanual Markers. Combining these new concepts and the signs your student has learned will expand her growing library of American Sign Language knowledge.

Descriptions

This unit will teach your student how to sign various descriptions using American Sign Language. He will learn how to sign comparative adjectives and show comparison between two or more nouns or pronouns. Also, he will learn the signs for descriptive words that express size, shape, possession, color, and location. In addition, he will combine some previously taught signs for numbers, time, and nouns, with descriptive signs taught in this unit.

Sign Language II A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Sign Language I

Description:
In this course, the student will continue his study of American Sign Language. The student will expand his ASL vocabulary, grammar, and conversational skills. In addition, the student will complete activities and exercises that help him understand the culture of deaf and hard-of-hearing community.

Units:

Foundations and Fundamentals in ASL

This unit reviews some of the basic structural components of American Sign Language, including the topic-comment structure of sentences, how to form a Who-What-When-Where-Why-How (Wh) and Yes-No (Y/N) question, and non-manual markers. To better understand the history of deaf education in America and its impact on deaf education and deaf culture today, you will learn about mainstreaming versus schools for the deaf. Finally, to check understanding, you will complete Quick Checks and quizzes.

Say What You Mean

In this unit, you will learn how and when to use mouth morphemes and conceptual signing to help you communicate with a clear intent when using ASL. You will also learn how conceptual signing plays an important part in describing English idioms to the deaf. Weather signs will be introduced.

Working and Playing with Direction and Inflection

Throughout this unit, students will discover how to inflect vocabulary in ASL in order to include additional information about topics without having to include additional signs. New vocabulary will be focused around adjectives, classifiers, work, and play, activities. Students will also gain additional practice using new ASL classifiers.

Conjunction, Travel, and Putting It All Together

Throughout this unit, students will learn about conjunctions and noun-verb pairs as and will increase vocabulary that includes noun and verb pairs, classifiers, and travel words. Students will also gain additional practice using inflection.

Pronominals, Places, and Spaces

Throughout this unit, students will discover pronominals. In ASL, pronominals are pronouns that take the place of nouns. Students will learn how, in conversational American Sign Language (ASL), classifiers can be pronominals that take the place of nouns and pronouns. New vocabulary will include words used to describe a room. Students will also gain additional practice becoming fluent in conversational ASL.

Spanish I A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
Spanish I A is a beginning level course that will introduce the student to a variety of areas of the Spanish language. In this course, the student will learn listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through interesting and engaging activities. This course is organized into five topics including greetings, the date, weather, time, and colors. The student will learn to express himself using an ever-increasing vocabulary, present-tense verbs, articles, and adjectives. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Elements of the Spanish-speaking world and culture appear throughout the course, including people, geographical locations, and histories.

Units:

Saludos

Each lesson will contain material that will build upon material that was presented in previous lessons. In ¡Saludos!, students will learn to:

  • ¥ introduce themselves to someone and ask their name
  • ¥ ask how someone is
  • ¥ ask where someone lives
  • ¥ inquire some basic information of others in real conversations
  • ¥ recognize and recite the Spanish alphabet
  • ¥ spell words verbally using the Spanish alphabet
  • ¥ use appropriate basic vocabulary for greeting people at different times of day
  • ¥ choose a farewell appropriate in various situations
  • ¥ begin to learn about the complex nature of language
  • ¥ investigate the Hispanic culture, and begin to realize the contributions that Hispanics have made to our world

El Día y La Fecha

In this unit, students will:

  • ¥ talk about the day of the week
  • ¥ learn the numbers 0–31
  • ¥ talk about the date
  • ¥ talk about what things they like to do on different days
  • ¥ talk about their birthdays
  • ¥ learn about the country of Spain and several important cultural aspects of that country
  • ¥ learn about nouns and how to make them plural
  • ¥ learn that nouns have gender
  • ¥ learn the definite articles and their forms
  • ¥ learn to recognize subject pronouns

El Tiempo

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. talk about the weather
  2. 2. talk about the seasons
  3. 3. convert degrees from the Fahrenheit scale to Centigrade and vice versa
  4. 4. express possession
  5. 5. learn the indefinite articles
  6. 6. manipulate regular -ar verbs
  7. 7. talk about what one would wear in various situations
  8. 8. learn about Argentina

La Hora

In this unit, students will:

  • ¥ talk about places in a town
  • ¥ talk about things to do in school
  • ¥ talk about things one does at different places in a town
  • ¥ manipulate some irregular verbs
  • ¥ manipulate regular -er and -ir verbs
  • ¥ learn to ask yes/no and information questions
  • ¥ learn about Ecuador

Los Colores

In this unit, students will:

  • ¥ describe themselves and others using ser and adjectives
  • ¥ learn to describe things using colors
  • ¥ learn that adjectives in Spanish have different forms based on gender and number
  • ¥ learn that adjectives in Spanish are placed differently than in English
  • ¥ learn additional people nouns
  • ¥ learn how to talk about basic things that might be in a school, desk, or backpack
  • ¥ learn how to talk about their school day
  • ¥ learn about Costa Rica

Examen

This unit contains students’ Semester Exam

Spanish I B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Spanish I A

Description:
Spanish I B is a beginning level course that will introduce the student to a variety of areas of language learning. In this course, the student will learn listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a variety of activities. This course is organized into five topics including greetings, the date, weather, time, and colors. The student will learn to express himself using an ever-increasing vocabulary, present-tense verbs, articles, and adjectives. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Elements of the Spanish-speaking world and culture appear throughout the course, including people, geographical locations, and histories.

Units:

Los Lugares

In this unit, students will learn to:

  1. 1. talk about their cities or towns
  2. 2. talk about additional stores or places in their towns
  3. 3. describe where things are in relation to other things in their towns
  4. 4. talk about things they do, like to do, need to do, want to do, or have to do
  5. 5. talk more about cognates
  6. 6. research and gather information about Venezuela
  7. 7. understand more about cities in Spanish speaking countries

La Familia

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. talk about their family members
  2. 2. talk about their family members’ birthdays and ages
  3. 3. review dates and numbers
  4. 4. investigate cultural practices in Hispanic families
  5. 5. learn possessive adjectives

La Comida

In this unit, students will learn to:

  1. 1. talk about foods
  2. 2. learn to order food and converse in a restaurant
  3. 3. learn about verbs that stem-change e to i
  4. 4. learn expressions with tener
  5. 5. learn about dining habits in the Spanish speaking world

Las Actividades

In this unit, students will learn to:

  • ¥ talk about sports and leisure time activities in the Spanish speaking world
  • ¥ learn how to talk about what they like to do
  • ¥ learn the verb “jugar” that stem-changes
  • ¥ learn additional cognate patterns

La Escuela y La Rutina

In this unit, students will:

  • ¥ talk about schools and school activities in the Spanish-speaking world
  • ¥ learn to talk about your school day in more detail
  • ¥ learn to talk about your house
  • ¥ learn to talk about chores and responsibilities you have at home
  • ¥ learn to talk about your plans
  • ¥ review verb structures we have had in this year of Spanish
  • ¥ learn additional cognate patterns

Examen

This unit contains the Spanish I B Semester Exam

Spanish II A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Spanish I

Description:
This course builds on the skills the student learned in Spanish I. In this course, the student will learn listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a variety of activities. This course is organized into five topics including daily routine, animals, hobbies, the body, and descriptions. The student will learn to express himself using an ever-increasing vocabulary, present-tense verbs, articles, and adjectives. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Elements of the Spanish-speaking world and culture appear throughout the course, including people, geographical locations, and histories.

Units:

La Rutina Diaria

In this unit students are going learn to talk about their daily routine – those things that people do on a daily basis. They will:

  1. 1. talk about what they do in a typical day
  2. 2. review telling time
  3. 3. continue to develop conversational skills
  4. 4. learn more about the history of Spain
  5. 5. study the art of El Greco
  6. 6. study the art of Velázquez

Los Animales

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. learn to talk about farm animals
  2. 2. learn to talk about tropical forest animals
  3. 3. compare nouns
  4. 4. use demonstrative adjectives to talk about which things they prefer
  5. 5. learn about different musical styles in the Spanish-speaking world
  6. 6. learn the present progressive in Spanish
  7. 7. learn additional cognate patterns

La Diversión

In this unit, students will:

  • ¥ talk about your hobbies
  • ¥ talk about sports and other pastimes
  • ¥ make comparison statements
  • ¥ make superlative statements
  • ¥ learn direct object pronouns and placement
  • ¥ study art from Spanish and Latin American artists

El Cuerpo

In this unit, students will:

  • ¥ talk about the body
  • ¥ talk about what different body parts do
  • ¥ talk about a doctor’s visit
  • ¥ talk about various illnesses
  • ¥ learn indirect object pronouns
  • ¥ begin to learn the preterit (past tense) verb forms
  • ¥ learn about Central American nations

La Descripción

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. describe themselves and others using ser and adjectives
  2. 2. describe themselves and others using estar and adjectives
  3. 3. learn the basic differences between ser and estar
  4. 4. learn more of the past tense verbs in Spanish
  5. 5. learn to talk about people’s nationalities
  6. 6. learn about Cuba
  7. 7. learn about the life of José Martí
  8. 8. learn about the Dominican Republic

Examen

This unit contains the Semester Exam

Spanish II B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Spanish II A

Description:
This course is a continuation of Spanish II A. The student will continue to sharpen his listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a variety of activities. This course is organized into five topics including the house, shopping, entertainment, more free time, and trips. The student will learn to express himself using an ever-increasing vocabulary, present-tense verbs, past-tense verbs, articles, and adjectives. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Elements of the Spanish-speaking world and culture appear throughout the course, including people, geographical locations, and histories.

Units:

La Casa

In this unit, students will learn to:

  1. 1. talk about their house (rooms and furnishings)
  2. 2. talk about activities that happened in the past
  3. 3. learn additional cognate patterns
  4. 4. learn about homes in other countries
  5. 5. continue to develop conversational skills in Spanish

Las Compras

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. learn to talk about shopping
  2. 2. learn to bargain in a Spanish-speaking market
  3. 3. compare items in Spanish
  4. 4. talk about fashion
  5. 5. talk about their preferences
  6. 6. learn to use the numbers beyond 100 in conversational Spanish and especially when dealing with shopping
  7. 7. practice talking about activities that happened in the past
  8. 8. learn additional cognate patterns

El Entretenimiento

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. talk about events they can go to for entertainment
  2. 2. talk about eating at a restaurant
  3. 3. learn to make negative responses in answering questions
  4. 4. learn to talk about things they love or like
  5. 5. talk about how frequently they do things
  6. 6. talk about when things happen (today, yesterday, tomorrow)
  7. 7. study dance forms

Más Tiempo Libre

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. talk about sports and other activities
  2. 2. learn expressions to talk about feelings they are experiencing
  3. 3. learn additional cognate patterns
  4. 4. learn to talk about who things belong to
  5. 5. review talking about activities in the past
  6. 6. talk about what hobbies or activities they like to do in their spare time

Los Viajes

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. learn to talk about taking a trip internationally
  2. 2. plan an international trip
  3. 3. learn to ask about where things are located in a city
  4. 4. express activities that are going to happen in the near future
  5. 5. talk about activities that happened in the past
  6. 6. talk about things you know and people or places you are familiar with
  7. 7. learn additional false cognates
  8. 8. review telling time

Examen

This unit contains the Semester Exam.

Spanish III A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Spanish II

Description:
Spanish III A is a continuation of the first two years of Spanish instruction. The student will continue to sharpen his listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a variety of activities. This course is organized into five topics: feelings, transportation, work, countries, and the future. The student will learn to express himself using an ever-increasing vocabulary, present-tense verbs, past-tense verbs, articles, and adjectives. Elements of the Spanish-speaking world and culture appear throughout the course, including people, geographical locations, and histories.

Units:

Los Sentimientos

In this unit, students will review the following:

  1. 1. Describing people and things
  2. 2. Talking about things that happened in the past
  3. 3. Talking about things that they and others do
  4. 4. Using appropriate expressions to express everyday things they would like to say
  5. 5. Expressing things they do not do with the correct negative expressions
  6. 6. Talking about your daily routine

Students will be also be introduced to the following:

  1. 1. Reviewing and discussing cultural practices of the Hispanic people
  2. 2. Reviewing historical details about Spain
  3. 3. How to say that they do something with other people

La Transportación

In this unit, students will review the following:

  1. 1. Describing things and people
  2. 2. Talking about things that happened in the past

Students will be introduced to the following:

  1. 1. Talking about how frequently or how they do things
  2. 2. Talking about where things are
  3. 3. Making commands
  4. 4. Talking about transportation and getting from one place to another and how
  5. 5. New cultural and historical issues in the Spanish-speaking world

A Trabajar

In this unit, students will review the following:

  • ¥ Telling others what to do and giving advice
  • ¥ Making negative statements and negative advice

Students will be introduced to the following new concepts:

  • ¥ Asking questions
  • ¥ Talking about the past, what they used to do
  • ¥ Expressing what things they may be obligated to do
  • ¥ Talking about various professions that people have and their responsibilities in these professions

Los Países Y Las Nacionalidades

In this unit, students will review the following:

  • ¥ Talking about and describing actions that happened in the past
  • ¥ Talking about what they or someone are doing right now
  • ¥ Talking about things, people and places they know

They will be introduced to the following:

  • ¥ New vocabulary having to do with international affairs

El Futuro

In this unit, students will review the following:

  • ¥ Talking about things happening in the present
  • ¥ Talking about things that happened in the past

They will be introduced to the following:

  • ¥ Learning to write a letter in Spanish
  • ¥ Talking about things that will happen in the future
  • ¥ Talking about things that might happen (if other conditions are met)
  • ¥ Talking about the environment

Examen

This unit contains the Semester Exam.

Spanish III B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Spanish IIIA

Description:
Spanish III B is a continuation of the first two and a half years of Spanish instruction. The student will continue to sharpen his listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a variety of activities. Throughout the five topics covered in this course, the student will learn to express himself using an ever-increasing vocabulary, present-tense verbs, past-tense verbs, future-tense verbs, conditional-tense verbs, articles, and adjectives. Grammar is introduced and practiced in innovative and interesting ways with a variety of learning styles in mind. Elements of the Spanish-speaking world and culture appear throughout the course, including people, geographical locations, and histories.

Units:

La Salud

In this unit, students will review…

  • ¥ talking about themselves, how they feel, how others feel
  • ¥ asking questions about how others feel
  • ¥ expressing things that happened in the past
  • ¥ talking about the future

New concepts:

  • ¥ Talking about health professions
  • ¥ Talking about things that can be wrong or hurting
  • ¥ Talking about your daily routine and things they do with or to other people

La Casa

In this unit, los estudiantes van a estudiar lo siguiente:

  1. 1. They will review talking about how they do things or how frequently or how well they do them.
  2. 2. They will review talking about things that would happen (if other things were to happen).
  3. 3. They  will review telling people what to do.

New concepts:

  1. 1. Expressing what they would like
  2. 2. Giving directions
  3. 3. Additional ways to talk about their homes
  4. 4. Cultural issues about Argentina

Las Medidas

This unit covers the following:

  1. 1. a review of talking about past, present, and future activities
  2. 2. a review of numbers
  3. 3. a review of comparing people, things, and activities
  4. 4. using a variety of expressions to express things in Spanish

Las Profesiones

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. talk about professions and jobs.
  2. 2. talk about getting an education.
  3. 3. reviewing the use of pronouns to talk about things and people.
  4. 4. reviewing weather and units of time.

Mi Historia Personal

In this unit, students will review:

  • ¥ vocabulary and expressions to talk about themselves
  • ¥ expressions of time and talking about the past
  • ¥ more with the passive voice
  • ¥ expressing quantities
  • ¥ a review of talking about the present, past, and future

Examen

This unit contains the Semester Exam.

Spanish IV A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Spanish III

Description:
This fourth year of Spanish covers advanced grammar including present-tense verbs, past-tense verbs, future tense, conditional tense, subjunctive mood, articles, and adjectives. In the first semester, students focus on the Spanish-speaking world, including culture, people, geographical locations, and histories.

Units:

La Gente

In this unit, students will review:

  1. 1. Describing people and things
  2. 2. Talking about what they like to do
  3. 3. Talking about what their day is like
  4. 4. Talking about the activities they like to do

Students will be introduced to:

  1. 1. Spanish historical and cultural information
  2. 2. Additional family members they might wish to talk about

Los Logros

In this unit, students will review :

  • ¥ Telling people how to do things
  • ¥ Talking about things they do or have done
  • ¥ Talking about their accomplishments
  • ¥ Reviewing the use of numbers in Spanish

Students will learn:

  • ¥ To explain about things they have accomplished
  • ¥ Talking about activities that involve uncertainty or doubt
  • ¥ Cultural and historical issues

Los Deseos

In this unit, students will review:

  • ¥ Talking about things they want others to do
  • ¥ Talking about the environment
  • ¥ Talking about things they should do to be responsible in the environment
  • ¥ Talking about their homes and things they do in their homes

Students will be introduced to:

  • ¥ Talking about what their desires are
  • ¥ Talking about things they hope will happen

Actividades

In this unit, students will review:

  • ¥ Talking about things they like to do in the outdoors
  • ¥ Talking about things they want others to do
  • ¥ Expressing that others want them to do certain things
  • ¥ Talking about things related to the outdoors and to cities in general

Students will be introduced to:

  • ¥ How to talk about what has happened happened by a certain time

Celebraciones

In this unit students will review:

  • ¥ How to talk about things that are happening
  • ¥ How to talk about things that will happen
  • ¥ How to talk about things that happened in the past
  • ¥ How to talk about dates and days

Students will be introduced to:

  • ¥ Días de fiesta in Spanish-speaking America
  • ¥ How to talk about what will have happened by a certain time

Examen

This unit contains the Semester Exam.

Spanish IV B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Spanish IV A

Description:
This fourth year of Spanish covers advanced grammar including present-tense verbs, past-tense verbs, future tense, conditional tense, subjunctive mood, articles, and adjectives. In the second semester students continue to focus on the Spanish-speaking world, including culture, people, geographical locations, and histories.

Units:

Posibilidades

In this unit, students will:

  1. 1. Review talking about the future and things that would happen (if other conditions were met)
  2. 2. Learn patterns in words
  3. 3. Analyze proverbs in Spanish
  4. 4. Learn about Puerto Rico and its contributions, musically and artistically, to the Spanish-speaking world

El Pasado

In this unitstudents are going to review:

  1. 1. How to use adverbs to talk about how frequently or how well they do things
  2. 2. Talking about your past and things that happened in the past

Students will be introduced to:

  1. 1. Verbs in the past tense that take on a special meaning
  2. 2. New proverbs in Spanish
  3. 3. Additional suffix patterns that will help to expand their vocabulary in Spanish
  4. 4. Additional food vocabulary

Las Artes

In this unit, the student will:

  1. 1. Learn to talk about what others have said
  2. 2. Learn about the fine arts in the Spanish-speaking world
  3. 3. Leview the correct sequencing of tenses for expressing thoughts in the past, present and future
  4. 4. Learn additional proverbs or sayings that are well known in the Spanish-speaking world and will help gain insight to the Hispanic thought process
  5. 5. Learn about artists, both contemporary and historic, of great significance
  6. 6. Learn to talk about other art forms and learn ways in which they relate to the Spanish-speaking world

Ahora

In this unit students will:

  1. 1. Learn vocabulary that will allow them to talk about electrical items that are very common in today’s world
  2. 2. Learn to talk about actions that happen that were not planned
  3. 3. Review irregular verbs in Spanish in order to be able to use them in conversation
  4. 4. Learn shortcuts in order to be able to use colloquial expressions instead of always using the noun
  5. 5. Learn additional idioms and sayings in Spanish and learn to analyze them for understanding
  6. 6. Sharpen listening skills

Se Acaba

In this unit, the student will:

  1. 1. Review talking about happenings in the past, present, and future
  2. 2. Review “shortcuts” for talking about others using a variety of pronouns
  3. 3. Review ways to talk about how you do things
  4. 4. Learn of additional writers important to the Latin Americans, both contemporary and historical
  5. 5. Learn of additional traditions that are important to Hispanics

Examen

This unit contains the semester exam.

Journalism A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
From examining the guidelines of proper journalism to firsthand practice in writing news, sports, and feature articles, students experience the media writing process and how it applies to today’s world of journalism. In Journalism A, students review the guidelines for good journalism and learn the elements of news, feature, and sports writing.

Units:

The Guidelines of Good Journalism

This unit introduces the guidelines for good journalism. In addition, you learn how to manage time and research so that publication deadlines are met on time. More importantly, you will learn about the legal issues that are important to avoid when using sources and information. To avoid these problems, skills such as summarizing, paraphrasing and attributing sources are practiced.

Learning the Process

This unit provides you with the skills and applications for mastering the process of writing a story for publication. You will learn to use a variety of sources to brainstorm for story ideas and sources as well as develop some strategies for designing and implementing surveys and interviews to provide primary sources for your stories. Overall, by the completion of this unit, you will be prepared to be a well-informed, efficient, and effective reporter.

News Writing

Within each lesson of this unit, you apply the process of thinking about stories, writing, brainstorming for ideas and sources, researching sources, drafting the first versions, copyediting, and writing the final stories. Each type of reporting has its own unique organization and writing style. To provide audience interest in your story, you may use published data, statistics, and survey results, as well as your own interviews and surveys.

Sports Writing

Whether or you are personally involved in a specific sport, you will find so many interesting topics to write about. If you are not interested in sports, you still have the ability to write about them. At the heart of all journalism is a similar set of skills that can be used to write about a football game, a bank robbery, a new film, or a tax bill. First, you will learn the criteria of sports reporting. Once you understand the criteria, story ideas are developed.

Feature Writing

In this unit, you use interviews and surveys for primary sources by using observations of an event or setting , including “on-the-spot” interviews.

One of the best ways to make a feature story come to life is through photographs of the places and events covered, so if you are handy with a camera, you will be asked to start thinking about a story idea and looking for good photo opportunities.

Journalism A Review and Final Exam

Journalism B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
The second course in Journalism reviews the evolution of journalism and its role in today’s world. Students learn critical writing (reviews) as well as the steps for crafting editorials. The final unit introduces students to the basics in media design, including topics in multimedia presentation.

Units:

Evolution in Journalism

In this unit, you will understand the evolution of competitive journalism by analyzing the motives of William Randolph Hearst. You will explain how yellow journalism shaped the Spanish-American War. Later in this unit, you will define media and identify ways media changed in the 20th Century, including how television affected the habits and opinions of the American family. You will learn how new forms of media have changed journalism and analyze how the Internet has impacted the power of media.

Journalism in the World Today

In this unit, you will examine the reciprocal effect that media have on political and international events. It might be said that a successful global community hinges on fair and accurate reporting. Communication among people of the world is dependent on the commitment and honesty of its journalists. When those factors are missing, communication breaks down.

Review Writing

In this unit, you will conduct evaluations of the two products or services about which you will write. Time-management is important for setting up surveys or interviews, so make sure you have enough time to gather the information and determine your opinion. For most students, review writing is a rewarding and enjoyable endeavor!

Opinion Writing (Op-eds)

In this unit, you have the opportunity to express your opinion on a variety of topics of your choice. The first two lessons will give you lots of ideas and links for forming an opinion about a written opinion or even creating your own opinion cartoon.

Copy and Design

In this unit you will learn some of the criteria for being an editor. You will learn more about the roles of the various editorial positions and what each entails. You will also consider the importance of honing your grammar and writing skills, and you will spend time practicing each. Finally, you will learn about writing good headlines.

Journalism B Final Exam and Review

Speech and Debate

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
In this course, students learn how to apply visuals, style, stories, organization, and nonverbal communication to speeches. Students will learn tactics to help overcome fear, participate in debates, and rehearse effectively. Students will also learn how to evaluate great speeches from history as well as more modern media messages.

Units:

Style and Nonverbal Communication

Fear of Public Speaking

Organizing a Presentation

Making Presentations Memorable

Using Visuals

Debate and Persuasion

Great Speeches in History

Media Communication

Preparation, Rehearsal and Continual Improvement

Final Exam

AP Statistics A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Algebra 2

Description:
In this course, the student will become familiar with the vocabulary, method, and meaning in the statistics that exist in the world. This is an applied course in which the student will actively construct his own understanding of the methods, interpretation, communication, and application of statistics. Each unit is framed by enduring understandings and essential questions designed to allow the student a deep understanding of the concepts at hand rather than memorization and emulation.

The student will also complete several performance tasks throughout the year consisting of relevant, open-ended tasks requiring the student to connect multiple statistical topics together. The TI-83+/84 OR 89 calculator and computers will be used to explore the world of data and the patterns which can be found by analyzing this information as well as statistical relationships. General topics of study include exploring data, planning and design of a study, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference.

Units:

Welcome

Unit 1 is an introduction to the AP Statistics course, including course navigation, expectations, and a quiz.

Exploring Univariate Data

In this unit, you will learn how to graph a dataset in a variety of ways, describe essential aspects of that data, and make comparisons between two or more datasets. Some of the methods of visually displaying numerical data will be a review, while other methods will be new skills you can learn.

Exploring Bivariate and Categorical Data

In Unit 3, you will learn that, despite the shortcomings and bias and abuse, statistical modeling does indeed help you understand and even predict the world around you. You will learn how bivariate modeling works (and how it doesn’t work).

Conducting Studies and Experiments

This unit will teach you the difference between an observational study, an experiment, and a simulation. You will investigate to what extent data can be purposefully biased, and learn about good and bad samples.

Probability and Random Variables

This unit focuses on probability. You will learn about collection (sample size, disjunct, and independence) and display (Venn and tree diagrams) of probability.

Binomial, Geometric, and Sampling Distributions

In this unit, you will learn to recognize and apply the binomial distribution, and find the mean and standard deviation of a binomial distribution. You will also learn to recognize and apply the geometric distribution and find the geometric mean.

AP Statistics B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Statistics A

Description:
In this course, the student will become familiar with the vocabulary, methods, and meaning in the statistics that exist in the world. This is an applied course in which the student will actively construct his or her own understanding of the methods, interpretation, communication, and application of statistics. Each unit is framed by enduring understandings and essential questions designed to allow the student a deep understanding of the concepts at hand rather than by memorization and emulation. The student will also complete several performance tasks throughout the year consisting of relevant, open-ended tasks requiring the student to connect multiple statistical topics together.

The TI-83+/84 OR 89 calculator and computers will be used to explore the world of data and the patterns that can be found by analyzing this information as well as statistical relationships. General topics of study include exploring data, planning and design of a study, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference.

Units:

Introduction to Inference

In this unit, you will see that the notion and behavior of a random variable is foundational to understanding probability distributions and that the central limit theorem and normal distribution are essential to analyzing samples of data.

Inference for Means and Proportions

This unit focuses on inference, the mean of a population with a sample, the significance test, and confidence intervals. You will answer questions about how these topics apply to real life questions, as well as investigate data.

Inference for Goodness of Fit

This unit teaches you how confidence intervals are effective tools for estimating the mean of a population, and how significance tests determine the likelihood of a sample.

Review

This review unit, which contains only two lessons, is a collection of items that may prove useful to you in making preparations for the big test. You will not submit any assessments for a grade in this unit.

Culminating Project

The purpose of this unit is to have you complete a project-based assessment that shows the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data.

Driver’s Education

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
In this course, the student will learn the fundamental skills for responsible driving. The emphasis of this course is placed upon the mechanics of driving, execution of driving operations, and rules of safe driving. The student will identify and recognize traffic laws, signs and other markings, and basic checks on a vehicle, and the student will learn the rules for sharing the roadway, responding to weather conditions, and other vehicle emergencies.

Units:

Driving, Mobility, and Laws

Some of the most important things you need to learn to become a good driver are the fundamentals of the road. In this unit you will learn about driving responsibly, how to interact with others on the road, and how to minimize the risks of injury or damage to your vehicle.

You will also learn about the highway transportation system (HTS) and how the use of the HTS improves mobility for goods and people.

Basic Vehicle Control

Driving is more than starting up the car and going. In this unit, you will learn the foundations for basic vehicle control. Comfort and control systems, devices for visibility and protection, and information and communication systems will be explained in this lesson. You will also learn how to shift gears, steer, and control the speed of your vehicle. Finally, you will gain knowledge about how to safely execute basic maneuvers and develop good driving habits.

Foundations of Effective Driving

In order to someday become that “good driver” we referred to earlier, you must have an understanding of the foundations of effective driving. These skills include searching, giving meaning to what you have sensed, developing options, and responding in a safe and appropriate manner. In simpler terms this means that you will search the roadway ahead looking for possible things that may interfere with your path of travel. You will then predict if they will be a problem. Then you will decide what actions to take to manage them. And finally, you will carry out the actions such as steering, using your brakes, or accelerating. In Unit 3 of this course, you will learn the skills needed to establish these foundations of effective driving.

Applying Effective Driving

In this unit, you will learn how to apply driving techniques such as accelerating, steering, and braking which you learned about in previous lessons. You will consider various environmental situations and how they may affect the way you apply these techniques.Now that you know the meanings of road signs and how to control the vehicle, you will see how this knowledge can apply as you learn about driving through different types of situations. This lesson will help you realize that, as you drive, you are not only dealing with other vehicles, but you are also dealing with pedestrians, cyclists, and animals. You will want to know how to handle these situations so that you can safely share the road with others.Knowing how to handle any situation will allow you to become a responsible driver. This unit will help you apply the foundations learned in previous units.

Challenges to Vehicle Control

Not even the best of drivers can control every driving situation they encounter. Environmental conditions can challenge how much control you have over a vehicle. Natural laws of nature affect how a vehicle stops and moves. You will need to know what actions to take to counteract these situations. In addition, your ability to see and stop can be affected by changing weather, road, environmental, and driving conditions. You need to be comfortable with ways to respond to these changes.You often cannot predict vehicle malfunctions. Instead, you must be prepared to cope with challenging circumstances. And finally, you need to be prepared to handle your vehicle to compensate for the unsafe actions of other drivers. In this lesson, you will learn ways that you can cope with and adjust to the many challenges you may encounter within the driving environment.

Driving Readiness

A good driver must be physically, psychologically, socially, and emotionally ready for the challenges of driving. Impairment in any of these areas poses a major problem when driving. Impairment may be as simple as being tired. Illness, injury, chronic disease, and emotions can also play a part in driver impairment. These forms of impairment as well as alcohol, drug, peer pressure, and vehicular problems, can all lead to dangerous situations.

Final Exam

In this unit you will complete your final exam for Driver’s Education. You will be required to recall the foundations of driving that you have learned throughout this course.

Course Sets

  • ¥ Driver’s Education

Textbook

  • ¥ Responsible Driving by McGraw-Hill/Glencoe

HS Critical Thinking and Study Skills

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful competion of Algebra 1.

Description:
In this course, the student will implement thinking strategies, learn test-taking strategies, time management and organization skills, build verbal competence, and sharpen his mathematics reasoning. Specifically, the student will learn strategies for acquiring, storing, and retrieving knowledge, and strategies for linking new information with prior knowledge.

Units:

Starting Your Sojourn

You will begin creating a rapport with the instructor while discussing their future goals in education and thoughts of careers.

Begin Your Vocabulary Adventure

With Unit 2, you will begin the vocabulary section. Giving good feedback is the important key for the teacher in this and other units.

In Flight “Air”ithmetic

Unit 3 begins the algebra and math portion of the course. It is important to give good feedback and be available for help when you need it.

Traveling Europe for Verbal Adventure

Unit 4 begins the verbal learning portion of the course. By learning more about Greek and Latin root words, you can only see improvement in the areas of analogies, sentence completion and critical reading skills.

Ambling Through Africa

Unit 5 begins the higher level math content. This is a critical unit for some of you, and it is recommended that you contact your teacher to go over missed questions in order to be successful and understand the question types.

Asian Adventures

Unit 6 contains the reading portion of the course. Here, you will need to think about the topics and current items used, and decipher content in different ways. Should you miss a main point, it is important for the teacher to help them either through lesson feedback, discussions, chats, or phone calls.

South American Adventures

Unit 7 covers Geometry and other miscellaneous math topics required for standardized testing success.

What’s New in North America?

Unit 8 contains the writing portion and the final exam.

HS Introduction to Entrepreneurship I

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
In this course you will learn the basics needed to plan and launch your own business. Do you have what it takes to start a new business? Do you have an idea for a business but need the tools to get started? This course will provide you with the core skills you need to become successful. In this course you will study the characteristics of successful entrepreneurs. You will also learn about self-employment and basic economic concepts related to small businesses, such as competition and production. This course will also walk you through the steps of setting up a business, including developing a business plan, a mission and a vision, attracting investors, and marketing your company.

Units:

Course Overview

In this unit, you will receive a basic overview of the course. You will learn how to navigate through the course, find and zip files, set up your Web browser, and complete coursework. You will also learn about using trustworthy sources, avoiding plagiarism, and making proper citations.

The Role of the Entrepreneur

In this unit, you will receive an introduction to what it means to be an entrepreneur. You will learn about types of entrepreneurs and the role of entrepreneurs in society. This unit will also explain basic economic concepts related to entrepreneurship, including producers and consumers, strong and weak economies, and capitalism and competition.

Entrepreneurship as a Career

In this unit, you will learn more about the life of an entrepreneur. This unit will explore some of the advantages and disadvantages of self-employment as well as detail the characteristics, skills, and education of successful entrepreneurs. This unit will also discuss reasons why a person becomes an entrepreneur and career paths that help develop entrepreneurial skills and characteristics.

Economic Principles

In this unit, you will learn more about some basic economic concepts related to entrepreneurship. You will learn about profit and loss, profit motive, and competition. You will also learn about production, goods, scarcity, and the law of supply and demand.

Production and Delivery

In this unit, you will learn how entrepreneurs produce and deliver goods and services to markets. You will explore some of the different industries and delivery methods. You will also learn about related economic concepts, including economic utility, economies of scale, market saturation, and product life cycle.

Small Business Basics

In this unit, you will explore the stages and forms of small businesses. Related to this, you will learn about how to form departments and factors that contribute to success and failure. You will also become more familiar with the importance of business ethics.

Business Ideas and Opportunities

In this unit, you will learn the role of entrepreneurs and small businesses in society and the global economy. Related to this, you will explore how business trends affect entrepreneurial ideas and opportunities. You will also learn about methods and resources that will help you generate business ideas and wisely select the best plan based on your goals, skills, personality, and resources.

Defining Your Business

In this unit, you will learn about the importance and parts of a business plan. Related to this, you will how to craft a mission and vision statement. You will also learn how to determine the scope of a business, including the products and services that will be offered.

Business Organization

In this unit, you will learn about various forms of business organization as well as accompanying legal and tax procedures. Related to this, you will learn about franchising, business licenses, and permits. You will also explore ways to organize and manage employees, records, purchasing, and inventory.

Marketing Basics

In this unit, you will explore basic concepts related to marketing an entrepreneurial initiative or business, including market positioning, penetration, and research. You will also learn about establishing a corporate and brand image and the steps involved in developing a marketing message.

Promoting Your Company

In this unit, you will learn about diverse methods for promoting an entrepreneurial initiative or business. Related to this, you will explore promotional methods, costs, and evaluation. You will also learn about advertising methods and goals as well as the parts of a marketing plan.

HS Introduction to Entrepreneurship II

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
In this course you will continue to learn the skills and key concepts that you’ll need to plan and launch your own successful business. You will learn about establishing a personal vision and setting goals for your business. You will also learn about the lives of entrepreneurs and inventors. Additionally, you will gain a better understanding of the stages involved in entrepreneurship, including identifying opportunities, planning, developing strategies, and making sales. You will likewise learn financial concepts and skills involved in entrepreneurship, such as budgeting, financing, costs, pricing, accounting, bookkeeping, and financial reporting. Through this course, you will also learn the basics of working with others and managing employees.

Units:

Course Overview

In this unit, you will receive a basic overview of the course technology. You will learn how to navigate the course, find and zip files, set up your browser, and complete coursework. You will also learn about using trustworthy sources, avoiding plagiarism, and making proper citations.

Sales

In this unit, you will learn the principles of selling, including the stages and steps involved in sales. You will learn to identify and take advantage of selling opportunities through various tools and strategies. You will also learn about meeting sales quotas, earning commissions, and network marketing.

Pricing

In this unit, you will learn about setting the price of goods and services. You will learn how to calculate costs and take into account variable and fixed costs as well as break-even points and external pricing factors. You will also learn about elastic and inelastic demand, price fixing, and bait-and-switch advertising.

Personal Finance

In this unit, you will learn about personal finance. You will learn how to develop a personal vision statement and establish financial goals. You will also become familiar with concepts and strategies related to budgeting, banking, and investing.

Credit, Funding and Risk

In this unit, you will learn how to build good credit, obtain funding, and manage risk. To this end, you will learn about credit history and scores. You will also learn about loans and lines of credit. Additionally, you will become familiar with business and opportunity costs, cash flow, and insurance.

Accounting

In this unit, you will learn the concepts and skills important to accounting. You will become familiar with financial health factors, such as revenue. You will also learn bookkeeping principles and become familiar with financial reporting and ratios.

Taxes and Laws

In this unit, you will learn about taxes and laws that particularly affect small businesses and entrepreneurs. You will learn about preparing taxes and the government’s role in the economy. You will also explore legal practices that affect small businesses, such as contracts, torts, and intellectual property.

Culture, Globalization and Technology

In this unit, you will focus on business culture and the impact of globalization and technology on entrepreneurship. You will explore global trade and the various benefits. Likewise you will learn about the uses of technology in the workplace and how to conduct business over the internet.

Workplace Skills

In this unit, you will become familiar with attitudes and behaviors that ensure success in the workplace. You will also learn skills that translate into workplace success, such as proper communication, management, and leadership. Likewise, you will learn the skills necessary to obtain a job, including interviewing well and developing a strong resume. Finally, you will learn how to locate, hire, and orientate employees.

Introduction to Marketing I

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
Do you have a business idea, but are unsure about how to market your ideas to customers? Do careers in business appeal to you? In this Introduction to Marketing class, you’ll master the basics of marketing, including core concepts such as financing, pricing, distribution, product management, and more. Throughout the course you’ll learn about the basics of economics and economic systems, managing business finances accounting practices, operating a business in the global marketplace, generating business ideas and seeking out business opportunities, creating a business plan, and promoting and advertising a business.

Units:

Course Overview

In this unit, you will receive a basic overview of the course. You will learn how to navigate through the course, find and zip files, set up your Web browser, and complete coursework. You will also learn about using trustworthy sources, avoiding plagiarism, and making proper citations.

Economics

In this unit, you will learn about basic economic concepts involving scarcity, markets, goods and services, producers and consumers, and supply and demand. You will also learn about capitalism and other types of economic systems.

Costs and Profit

In this unit, you will learn about business costs, including revenue and profit. You will also learn about concepts related to efficiency and productivity, including specialization, division of labor, and economies of scale. This unit also teaches the concepts of value and economic utility.

Business Types

In this unit, you will learn about owning and running a business. You will learn about types of industries, goods and services, liability, and taxation. You will also learn about business ownership, the stages and structures of a business, market saturation, and the product life cycle.

Money Management

In this unit, you will learn about managing your money. Income, economic goals, and budgeting will be covered. You will also learn about banking risks and security, investing, equity and debt investments, and investment income.

Taxes and Credit

In this unit, you will learn about taxes, including payroll withholding. You will also learn about credit and debit. Related to this, you will learn about loans, credit history, and credit scores.

Business Finance

In this unit, you will learn about business finance and accounting. Related to this, you will learn about funding, financial health, bookkeeping, financial statements, risk and risk management, and opportunity cost.

Business and Society

In this unit, you will learn about globalization, including importing and exporting. You will also learn about government agencies and regulations that affect businesses. This unit also discusses issues of law related to business, including contracts, intellectual property, ethics, and conflicts of interest.

Business Planning

In this unit, you will learn about how to plan and realize business ideas and opportunities. Related to this, you will learn about the importance of business trends. You will also explore how to develop mission, vision, and value statements and establish the scope of a business.

Marketing

In this unit, you will learn about the importance of marketing to business. Related to this, you will learn about developing a brand, corporate image, marketing message, and marketing plan. You will also become familiar with various marketing tools and the concepts of market share and market penetration.

Promotion

In this unit, you will learn about promoting a business. You will learn about promotional and advertising methods. You will also learn about evaluating promotions and advertisements.

Anatomy and Physiology

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This course was designed to provide the student with an introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the 11 major body systems. The student will examine the general anatomy and physiology associated with the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, respiratory, circulatory, digestive, urinary, reproductive, immune, endocrine, and nervous systems. Throughout the course, the student will identify the latest research and medical advancements related to the 11 body systems and investigate potential careers associated with anatomy.

Units:

Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology

This unit you will get to know one another as you become familiar with the VHS classroom environment. You will tell us a bit about yourself, discuss the importance of classroom community, and download the necessary software for the course. We will start our exploration of anatomy by looking back at some history and talking in “anatomical terms.”

Cellular Structure and Function

This unit will review cellular structure and function. You will examine the organelles and their functions, create a functional cell through a classroom discussion, review the processes associated with cellular transport in a concept map and “teach” your classmates about one type of cell in the body. You will continue to get to know one another as you play “Bingo” and explain why you chose to take this class.

Examining Cells and Tissues

This unit will focus on the study of tissues as the next level of organization and examine the four major types of tissues in the human body. We will explore why microscopes are necessary to examine cells and tissues, you will use ImageJ for the first time as you measure some cells, you will participate in a “lab meeting” and write your first lab report. In the second part of the “Not Just Any Cell” lesson, you will describe one tissue that your cell is associated with.

Organ Systems and the Integumentary System

This unit you will continue to climb up the levels of biological organization to organs and organ systems. We will introduce the major organ systems in the body, explore the concept of homoestasis, and you will finish the “Not Just Any Cell” Project by relating your cell to two others. For the next ten units we will focus on one (or occasionally two) organ systems; this unit our investigation of organ systems begins with the Integumentary System.

The Skeletal System

This unit will focus on the Skeletal System. You will read about the anatomy and physiology associated with the bones, play some online games to test your knowledge of the names of bones and explain bone formation in simple terms. In hands on activities, you will build a joint and share it with your classmates, examine bone using ImageJ software. In a Discussion, you will participate in a lab meeting and talk about the most recent advancements pertaining to the skeletal system.

The Muscular System

This unit will focus on the Muscular System. You will read about the anatomy and physiology associated with the muscles, play some online games to test your knowledge of the names of muscles and report on the process of muscle contraction. In hands on activities, you will dissect a chicken leg, share your comments with your classmates and examine muscle using ImageJ software. In a Discussion, you will participate in the lab meeting and talk about the most recent advancements pertaining to the muscular system.

The Respiratory System

This unit will focus on the Respiratory System. You will read about the anatomy and physiology associated with this system, play some online games to test your knowledge of the names of structures in the airway and explain the process of breathing in simple terms. In hands on activities, you will complete the first part of a two week exercise physiology lab, share your data with your classmates and examine respiratory tissue using ImageJ software. In a Discussion, you will participate in a lab meeting and talk about the most recent advancements pertaining to the respiratory system.

The Circulatory System

This unit will focus on the heart and vessels. You will read about the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system, as we introduce the lymphatic system along with the circulatory system. You will provide some directions to an erythrocyte trying to navigate through the circulatory system and play an online game to test your knowledge of blood flow through the heart. In hands on activities, you will complete part 2 of the Exercise Physiology lab, share your results with your classmates and interpret the class data. You will examine blood and the typical hematocrit using ImageJ software. In a Discussion, you will participate in the lab meeting and talk about the most recent advancements pertaining to the circulatory system.

The Digestive System

This unit will focus on the Digestive System. You will read about the anatomy and physiology associated with the gastrointestinal tract. You will trace the pathway of food molecules through the digestive tract and highlight key enzymes. In hands on activities, you will examine your diet relative to recommended daily food intake, interpret your results and discuss the structure of the food pyramid. You will examine the histology of the GI tract using ImageJ software in an effort to relate it’s structure to its function. In a Discussion, you will participate in the lab meeting and talk about the most recent advancements pertaining to the digestive system.

The Urinary and Reproductive Systems

In this unit, you will turn your attention to two systems: the Urinary and the Reproductive Systems. You will read about the anatomy and physiology associated with urinary tract and the reproductive organs. You will provide a firsthand account of a journey through the kidneys as well as write a biography of egg and sperm. You will discuss the most recent advancements pertaining to both systems. This also marks the first unit of group work for the Anatomy and Physiology of Disease project; you will meet your group members, define some general rules for the group and choose a project.

Immune and Lymphatic Systems

This unit will focus on the body’s defenses: the immune and lymphatic systems. You will read about the anatomy and physiology associated with both systems. You will provide a eye witness account of the battle that occurs when the body comes under attack. You will discuss the most recent advancements pertaining to the immune system and focus on one particular vaccine to tell your classmates about. This unit is the first of research for your team project. You will investigate the etiology and symptoms associated with your disease and share the resources and information that you found with your teammates.

The Endocrine System

The endocrine system is a key player in maintaining homeostasis; it works closely with the nervous system to ensure a constant internal environment. This unit will examine the endocrine system, identifying the associated organs and glands. You will describe the process that occurs as a hormone is released, travels to the target cell and initiates a response. You will participate in the “Name that Hormone” game as you provide clues for a specific hormone to your classmates and try to identify hormones based on their clues. You will discuss the latest news associated with the endocrine system. In the third unit of team work, you will continue researching and discussing your disease, this time focusing on the treatments, possible cures and current research efforts.

The Nervous System

This unit will focus on the last of the 11 systems that you will be studying: the Nervous System. You will read about the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system. You will examine the anatomy of the brain and spinal cord and describe the events associated with an impulse. You will examine the histology of nervous tissue using ImageJ software in an effort to again relate structure to function. In a Discussion, you will participate in the lab meeting and talk about the most recent advancements pertaining to the nervous system. In your team project, you will collaborate with your classmates to create an interactive webpage that displays the information that you haveve collected about your disease.

Systems Function to Ensure Homeostasis

A healthy body is all about homeostasis and the endocrine system and nervous systems are key regulators in this process. This unit will examine how the body senses external signals as well as how the body systems cooperate to maintain the internal environment. You will research one of the five senses and contribute some information to the class. After choosing a system, you will describe a homeostatic mechanism and highlight how systems interact to maintain the balance. You will discuss potential careers associated with anatomy and their characteristics. In the team project, you will attend our “virtual scientific conference” where you will interact with your classmates in regards to your presentation as well as theirs.

All Systems Go!

The last unit of the course has arrived! This unit will revisit the History of Anatomy Discussion to bring the timeline up to date and have some fun sharing the 10 most fascinating facts about anatomy. You will have a chance to reflect on what you have learned in the course and share some parting thoughts with your classmates.

Earth Space Science A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
Why did early explorers risk their lives to reach the North Pole? Why does Earth look so beautiful when seen from space? What is really down at the bottom of the ocean? Discovering new things about Earth has been the dream of scientists and explorers for centuries. Today, it is your turn to continue that journey of discovery.Earth Space Science is a laboratory course focusing on the study of space and the geologic and atmospheric forces that shape the world. Through experimentation and investigation, the student will explore Earth cycles including the geosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, atmosphere, and the carbon cycle. The student will learn about scientific inquiry, geologic time, space exploration, the solar system, and the universe. The student will use web 2.0 tools, interactive experiences, higher-order thinking, collaborative projects, and real-world application through labs and a variety of assessments. Upon completion of the course, the student will have a clear understanding of the dynamic forces at work in the surrounding world, becoming better caretakers of planet Earth.

Units:

Introduction and Foundation

This unit is an introduction to the course. Some items covered include the motif, pace, lab safety, Scientific Method, and basic skills.

Weather and Climate

In this unit, you will learn about the atmosphere of our planet, weather factors, and severe weather.

The Waters

In this unit, you will learn about the water cycle and the processes involved in that cycle; watersheds and their importance; sea water; ocean currents; maps; and sea floor features.

Earth Space Science B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
Why did early explorers risk their lives to reach the North Pole? Why does Earth look so beautiful when seen from space? What is really down at the bottom of the ocean? Discovering new things about Earth has been the dream of scientists and explorers for centuries. Today, it is your turn to continue that journey of discovery.Earth/Space Science is a laboratory course focusing on the study of space, and the geologic and atmospheric forces that shape the world. Through experimentation and investigation, the student will explore Earth cycles including the geosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, atmosphere, and the carbon cycle. The student will learn about scientific inquiry, geologic time, space exploration, the solar system, and the universe. The student will use web 2.0 tools, interactive experiences, higher order thinking, collaborative projects, and real-world application through labs and a variety of assessments. Upon completion of the course, the student will have a clear understanding of the dynamic forces at work in the surrounding world, becoming better caretakers of planet Earth.

Units:

The Lands

In this unit, you will learn about the theory of plate tectonics, volcanoes, earthquakes, and other phenomena related to this theory. You will also learn about minerals, rocks and the rock cycle.

The Past

In this unit, you will learn about geologic time; relative and absolute dating techniques; the principles and laws by which geologists make assumptions about time; and fossils.

Space: The Final Frontier

In this unit, you will learn about the scientific beliefs about the origin of the universe; the components of the universe; galaxies; our galaxy; our solar system; the planets; and will take a closer look at earth/moon/sun relationships that result in our year, day, tides, and seasons.

Environmental Science A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
Environmental Science A offers students the opportunity to understand the concepts fundamental to ecology and measures to prevent damage to the environment. Lessons in the A course review the scientific method, discuss biodiversity, and review earth processes, including the rain and carbon cycles. Students take a detailed look at the various types of pollution and study how to safeguard resources.

Units:

The Methods and Nature of Environmental Science

Welcome to environmental science, the study of the interactions between the physical, chemical, and biological components of the environment, including their effects on all types of organisms. In this opening unit you will learn about the job of an environmentalist, review the scientific method, and explore how organisms are classified.

Earth’s Processes

Several natural processes and cycles affect organisms that inhabit the Earth. In this unit, you will learn about such phenomena as you analyze the water and carbon cycles, examine the greenhouse effect, and explore causes of air, water, and food chain pollution.

Final Review and Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. The final exam may include any material that has been presented throughout the semester. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes before you begin to review.

Environmental Science B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
In the second course of Environmental Science, students learn about environmental programs and policies, including waste management and conservation. Students study the effect of environmental organizations as well as government agencies charged with protecting the environment. The final unit examines technology and its impact on the environment; topics include energy production, modern agriculture, and public land management.

Units:

Environmental Science Programs and Policies

The United States has several agencies and departments that are dedicated to monitoring and protecting the nation’s natural resources. In this unit, you will learn about how these local and federal agencies work together to effect policy changes, regulate environmental concerns, and prevent further harm to the environment as we move into the future.

The Effects of Environmental Science Technology

There have been many recent advancements in environmental science technology. Many of the previous methods of energy and fuel production have caused harm to the world around you. Today, there are new and innovative methods geared towards preserving and protecting the environment. In this unit you will examine these technological advances and learn how environmental science is changing.

Final Review and Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. The final exam may include any material that has been presented throughout the semester. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes before you begin to review.

Forensics

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This course was designed to provide the student with a thorough exploration of forensics and its applications. The student will develop an appreciation for the investigative process and explore potential career opportunities in the field of forensic science. Activities will involve researching the methods that forensic scientists use to analyze a crime scene through research, discussion, and analysis. The student will analyze evidence and draw appropriate conclusions and solutions based on the physical evidence that is presented.

Honors Earth Space Science A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
Why did early explorers risk their lives to reach the North Pole? Why does Earth look so beautiful when seen from space? What is really down at the bottom of the ocean? Discovering new things about Earth has been the dream of scientists and explorers for centuries. Today, it is your turn to continue that journey of discovery.Earth Space Science is a laboratory course focusing on the study of space and the geologic and atmospheric forces that shape the world. Through experimentation and investigation, the student will explore Earth cycles including the geosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, atmosphere, and the carbon cycle. Teh student will learn about scientific inquiry, geologic time, space exploration, the solar system, and the universe. The student will use web 2.0 tools, interactive experiences, higher-order thinking, collaborative projects, and real-world application through labs and a variety of assessments. Upon completion of the course, the student will have a clear understanding of the dynamic forces at work in the surrounding world, becoming better caretakers of planet Earth.

Units:

Introduction and Foundation

This unit is an introduction to the course. Some items covered include the motif, pace, lab safety, Scientific Method and basic skills.

Weather and Climate

In this unit, you will learn about the atmosphere of our planet, weather factors, and severe weather.

The Waters

In this unit, you will learn about the water cycle and the processes involved in that cycle; watersheds and their importance; sea water; ocean currents; maps; and sea floor features.

Honors Earth Space Science B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
Why did early explorers risk their lives to reach the North Pole? Why does Earth look so beautiful when seen from space? What is really down at the bottom of the ocean? Discovering new things about Earth has been the dream of scientists and explorers for centuries. Today, it is your turn to continue that journey of discovery.Earth Space Science is a laboratory course focusing on the study of space and the geologic and atmospheric forces that shape the world. Through experimentation and investigation, the student will explore Earth cycles including the geosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, atmosphere, and the carbon cycle. The student will learn about scientific inquiry, geologic time, space exploration, the solar system, and the universe. The student will use web 2.0 tools, interactive experiences, higher-order thinking, collaborative projects, and real-world application through labs and a variety of assessments. Upon completion of the course, the student will have a clear understanding of the dynamic forces at work in the surrounding world, becoming better caretakers of planet Earth.

Units:

The Lands

In this unit, you will learn about the theory of plate tectonics, volcanoes, earthquakes, and other phenomena related to this theory. You will also learn about minerals, rocks and the rock cycle.

The Past

In this unit, you will learn about geologic time; relative and absolute dating techniques; the principles and laws by which geologists make assumptions about time; and fossils.

Space: The Final Frontier

In this unit, you will learn about the scientific beliefs about the origin of the universe; the components of the universe; galaxies; our galaxy; our solar system; the planets; and will take a closer look at earth/moon/sun relationships that result in our year, day, tides, and seasons.

Honors Marine Science A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Biology

Description:
As our amazing planet continues to change over time, it becomes increasingly more apparent how human activity has made environmental impacts. In the marine science course, you will delve deep into Earth’s bodies of water and study geologic structures and how they impact the oceans. You will investigate characteristics of various populations, patterns of distribution of life in our aquatic systems, and ongoing changes occurring everyday in our precious ecosystems.You will be amazed and enlightened at just how much our oceans and lakes affect climate, weather, and seasonal variations. You will have the opportunity to explore the relationships among living organisms and see how they are affected by our oceans currents, tides, and waves. Hold on, it is one amazing journey.

Units:

Nature of Science

Unit 1 reviews the scientific method, how to write a hypothesis, independent and dependent variables, the properties of water, origins of the earth’s oceans, and information about the Bay of Fundy.

Ocean Exploration

Unit 2 covers navigation, early ocean expeditions, the rocky shore habitat, crustaceans, and ocean zones. This unit gets you started on your voyage around the world, so it starts with navigation, then discusses earlier ocean research. You will explore the rocky shores of New England, and the organisms that live there. The end of the unit looks at the different ocean zones beginning at the continental shelf and moving outward.

Sea Turtles and Sandy Beaches

In Unit 3, you continue to travel south along the east coast of the United States and explore the sandy beach ecosystem. In Lessons 1-4, you will begin learning about sea turtles. Lesson 5 deals with the problems of the shrimping industry related to turtles, and then Lessons 6 and 7 deal with the sandy beach. Lessons 8 and 9 deal with pollution on the beach, and Lesson 9 with oil spills specifically.

Phytoplankton and Energy

Unit 4 has you traveling through the Panama Canal into the Pacific Ocean where you will explore the Galapagos Islands and then travel down the coast of South America. During the end of the unit, you will look at organisms in the Galapagos, and complete some assessments looking at organisms adapting to the environment. At the very end of the unit, you will learn about food webs, and the energy pyramid.

Honors Marine Science B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Biology and Marine Science A.

Description:
As our amazing planet continues to change over time, it becomes increasingly more apparent how human activity has made environmental impacts. In the marine science course, you will delve deep into Earth’s bodies of water and study geologic structures and how they impact the oceans. You will investigate characteristics of various populations, patterns of distribution of life in our aquatic systems, and ongoing changes occurring everyday in our precious ecosystems.You will be amazed and enlightened at just how much our oceans and lakes affect climate, weather, and seasonal variations. You will have the opportunity to explore the relationships among living organisms and see how they are affected by our oceans currents, tides, and waves. Hold on, it is one amazing journey.

Units:

Currents and the Antartic

In Unit 1 you travel to the Antarctic and explore the different ocean currents, El Nino and La Nina, hurricanes, and organisms in the Antarctic, and their adaptations.

Mollusks and Estuaries

In Unit 2 you will travel past Madagascar and then on to Australia. In this unit, you will look at coral reefs, mollusks, estuaries, and nutrient cycles. You will also complete a dissection lab where you dissect a squid and an oyster.

What we do not see under the Sea

Unit 3 has you traveling from Australia to Hawaii. You will look at the abyss, waves, tides, plate tectonics as well as fish classification and adaptations.

Marine Mammals

Unit 4 takes you from Hawaii to the west coast of the US, up the coast into Alaska. This unit covers marine mammal classification and characteristics, human involvement with marine mammals, the kelp ecosystem, and the commercial fishing industry.

Marine Science A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Biology

Description:
As our amazing planet continues to change over time, it becomes increasingly more apparent how human activity has made environmental impacts. In the marine science course, you will delve deep into Earth’s bodies of water and study geologic structures and how they impact the oceans. You will investigate characteristics of various populations, patterns of distribution of life in our aquatic systems, and ongoing changes occurring everyday in our precious ecosystems.You will be amazed and enlightened at just how much our oceans and lakes affect climate, weather, and seasonal variations. You will have the opportunity to explore the relationships among living organisms and see how they are affected by our oceans currents, tides, and waves. Hold on, it is one amazing journey.

Units:

Nature of Science

Unit 1 reviews the scientific method, how to write a hypothesis, independent and dependent variables, the properties of water, origins of the earth’s oceans, and information about the Bay of Fundy.

Ocean Exploration

Unit 2 covers navigation, early ocean expeditions, the rocky shore habitat, crustaceans, and ocean zones. This unit gets you started on your voyage around the world, so it starts with navigation, then discusses earlier ocean research. You will explore the rocky shores of New England, and the organisms that live there. The end of the unit looks at the different ocean zones beginning at the continental shelf and moving outward.

Sea Turtles and Sandy Beaches

In Unit 3, you continue to travel south along the east coast of the United States and explore the sandy beach ecosystem. In Lessons 1-4, you will begin learning about sea turtles. Lesson 5 deals with the problems of the shrimping industry related to turtles, and then Lessons 6 and 7 deal with the sandy beach. Lessons 8 and 9 deal with pollution on the beach, and Lesson 9 with oil spills specifically.

Phytoplankton and Energy

Unit 4 has you traveling through the Panama Canal into the Pacific Ocean where you will explore the Galapagos Islands and then travel down the coast of South America. During the end of the unit you will look at organisms in the Galapagos, and complete some assignments looking at organisms adapting to the environment. At the very end of the unit, you will learn about food webs, and the energy pyramid.

Marine Science B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Biology

Description:
As our amazing planet continues to change over time, it becomes increasingly more apparent how human activity has made environmental impacts. In the marine science course, you will delve deep into Earth’s bodies of water and study geologic structures and how they impact the oceans. You will investigate characteristics of various populations, patterns of distribution of life in our aquatic systems, and ongoing changes occurring everyday in our precious ecosystems.You will be amazed and enlightened at just how much our oceans and lakes affect climate, weather, and seasonal variations. You will have the opportunity to explore the relationships among living organisms and see how they are affected by our oceans currents, tides, and waves. Hold on, it is one amazing journey.

Units:

Currents and the Antarctic

In Unit 1 you travel to the Antarctic and explore the different ocean currents, El Nino and La Nina, hurricanes and organisms in the Antarctic and their adaptations.

Mollusks and Estuaries

In Unit 2 you will travel past Madagascar and then on to Australia. In this unit you will look at coral reefs, mollusks, estuaries, and nutrient cycles. You will also complete a dissection lab where you dissect a squid and an oyster.

What we do not see under the Sea

Unit 3 has you traveling from Australia to Hawaii. You will look at the abyss, waves, tides, plate tectonics, as well as fish classification and adaptations.

Marine Mammals

Unit 4 takes you from Hawaii to the west coast of the US, up the coast into Alaska. This unit covers marine mammal classification and characteristics, human involvement with marine mammals, the kelp ecosystem, and the commercial fishing industry.

AP Psychology

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This course is the equivalent of an introductory college course, including an overview of current research methods and theories. Students explore therapies used by professionals and examine the way people learn and think. Human reactions, instincts, aggression, intimacy, altruism, and information retention are also studied.

Units:

Introduction to Psychology

The Biological Basis of Behavior

Human Development and Awareness

Human Cognition

Human Motivation and Emotion

Human Interaction

Course Review

Online Text/eBook

  • ¥ iText Psychology, AP Edition

Textbook

  • ¥ AP Edition: Psychology

Psychology A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
The exploration of psychology begins with a historical review of how man has sought to explain human behavior from ancient times to today. Students learn about the research methods and how the scientific method of inquiry moved psychology from hypnosis and mesmerism to serious inquiry utilizing hard science to prove theories.

Units:

Introducing Psychology

In this introductory unit, you will learn about the importance of psychology as a field of inquiry and how for thousands of years man has sought to understand the inner workings of the human mind. You will explore psychology’s early roots in philosophy, religion, and mythology; marvel in the strange early “pseudo sciences;” and begin to understand how the rise of science set the stage for psychology as we know it today.The unit begins with an exploration of the value of psychology as a field of study through its practical applications to your everyday life. Through this, you will develop an appreciation for the goals of psychology and an understanding of its scientific basis.The road to modern day psychology is a long and twisting one that is marked by various conflicting perspectives. Because of this, our journey through this unit will take us through the last few centuries where we will meet the major players and the various schools of thought they represent. By building on these early perspectives you will come to understand how modern psychology is indeed a reflection of our current view of the world.

Research Methods Statistics

In the last unit, you learned about the scientific method and that psychologists rely on formal systematic observations to address their questions. It is this methodology that makes psychology scientific. In this unit, we will deepen your understanding of these methods so that you will be able to evaluate the research-based information that is presented to you in your daily life. It is important to think critically about data because you are bombarded with research findings nearly everyday. The government, advertisers, scientists and others use research data to draw conclusions about everything from the state of the economy and the safety of products to how to improve your health. Learning how to evaluate these reports from a research perspective will help you use this information wisely and to know which reports you should disregard because of flaws and/or limitations with the study.

Basics of the Nervous System

In this unit, you will explore the depths of the nervous system and its components. You will begin by understanding the form and functions of the most basic unit of the nervous system, the neuron. You will discover how electrochemical impulses stimulate neurons and nervous system pathways that affect both physical activities and thoughts. You will dissect the human brain in all its beauty and explore the amazing findings that have occurred as a result in technological advances in modern medicine and neuroscience. You will also examine the effects of other factors on behavior, both hormonal and genetic.

This investigation of the nervous system and the brain will further your understanding of the biological bases of behavior and lay the foundation for understanding how people think and perceive the world, and how drugs, sleep, and dreams affect the brain and behavior.

Altered States

The phrase “altered state of consciousness” was coined in the 1970s and describes intentionally, unnaturally induced changes in one’s mental state, sometimes attained through the use of recreational drugs and psychedelic substances such as LSD and marijuana.

To understand altered states of consciousness, you will build on what you have learned about the normal functioning of the brain and the nervous system and will explore what occurs in the brain during unconscious states. In this exploration, you will attempt to understand the mysteries of the most common unconscious states: sleep and dreams. You will discover that dreams are a language of imagery and that this imagery ranges from the normal to the surreal and can include frightening nightmares. You will come to realize that although this is an area of psychology research that has intrigued scientists and has been the subject of considerable research, no one is actually certain about the function of dreams and sleep.

Sensation and Perception

How do you obtain reliable and useful information about the environment through your senses? That is to say, how do you come to be aware of the stimuli in your surroundings? What can illusions tell you about how the visual system normally works?

In this unit, you will look at behavior (how does an outfielder catch a fly ball?) and neurophysiological evidence (what parts of the brain are most active when we view a spot of red light?). You will explore the anatomical structure of the various sensory systems (how is light transformed into a neural signal within the eye?); the functional architecture of the perceptual parts of the human brain; psychophysics (the quantitative measurement of perceptual experience); form, depth, and motion perception; color vision; visual attention; perceptual memory; auditory perception, and the sense of touch. You will learn about conscious awareness.

Development Theories

In this unit, you will be introduced to the field of developmental psychology, which is the study of behavior across the life span. You will survey the major theorists of this field and discern the key themes of various theoretical perspectives on human development related to cognitive, social, and emotional development, from birth through adolescence. You will learn that psychologists face two critical problems in understanding human development: 1) determining how environmental variables (such as parental attitudes) and biological characteristics (such as health) interact and influence behavior, and 2) understanding how behavioral changes influence one another. Finally, you will look at current research trends that stress the interaction of environmental events and biological traits that influence behavior and development, and understand how and why this research provides methods for helping children with risk factors to develop more normally.

Final Review and Exam

Psychology B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
In Psychology B, students investigate the brain personality theories in order to understand the complex mental processes of learning, memory, thought, and language. Mental health issues, ranging from stress to disorders, are discussed, and the last unit reviews various methods of therapy.

Units:

Psychological Testing

What is the nature of intelligence? All of us have some vague notion as to what intelligence means, but do we really know? In this unit, you will look at how psychologists seek to define this elusive notion of intelligence and how the various definitions of this phenomenon influence the development of instruments used to measure intelligence.

Some of the instruments for measuring intelligence that you will look at will be very familiar. In fact, you have probably taken a few or more of these tests. You will learn what these tests really seek to measure and how such tests measure different things. In this unit, you will learn about the difference between objective and projective tests, and you will begin to understand the difference between what an SAT or MMPI measures in contrast to some other measurement devices such as the Rorschach Ink Blot tests. Finally, you will have an opportunity to take a few of these tests online and see what the experts say about your personality.

Theories of Personality

In this unit, on personality theories, you will examine a number of theories from Sigmund Freud’s psychoanalysis to Carl Roger’s cognitive theory of “self.” While the sheer volume of personality theories will amaze you, you might find this area a bit confusing. You might ask, “who’s right?” Interestingly, this aspect of psychology is the least amenable to research and provides a great number of complimentary and sometimes conflicting theories. Another interesting thing about the exploration of personality theories is that you might expect it to be the easiest of all since we all come to it with direct access to our own thoughts and feelings and since we have plenty of experience dealing with people. But do not mistake familiarity with knowledge. In fact, the topic of theories of personality is probably one of the most difficult and most complex in the field of psychology. Finally, In this unit, you will come to realize that the study of personality theories is less scientific than you might hope. There will be theories that fit in better with your experiences of self than others. You will also find that there will be times that several theorists say similar things, even though they are taking very different approaches.

Learning, Memory, and Motivation

Learning is involved in almost every phenomenon psychologists study and occurs in many different ways. In this unit, you will explore the major learning theories that shape your understanding of learning principles and applications. Once you have an understanding of how learning occurs, you will begin your study of memory including the memory processes and systems and the nature of forgetting. In the later lessons, you will apply the foundational principles of learning and memory to explore the various forms of human thought and reasoning. This exploration will culminate in your study of the most complex cognitive product that humans have – language.

Stress, Coping, and Mental Health

What is stress? We think that we know what it means, but what does it have to do with psychology or mental health? In this unit, you will not only look at how psychologists define stress, but also what role stress plays in our psychological and physical well-being.

You will be very familiar with some of the ways that stress is defined. However, you will also look at the positive and necessary role that stress plays in our lives through functions such as “fight or flight” and “eustress.”

And since it seems that people are constantly looking for ways to reduce the amount of stress in their lives, you will also investigate various methods of stress management.

Disorders

In this unit, you will learn about the various disorders that can strike during a lifetime. Yet, while you will examine a range of disorders from schizophrenia to drug addiction, you will begin your exploration of disorders by considering an age-old question: “What is normal?” You will discover and learn to evaluate what constitutes normalcy within any given society. You will find that there are many more distinct, recognized disorders than you could have imagined, and you will learn the general characteristics of each. Along the way you will also gain some insight into the cause and prevalence of these disorders. You might be surprised to find which of them are influenced by biological factors (such as genetics and chemical imbalance) as well as how many of them strike adolescents and very young adults.

Therapy and Change

If you are at all familiar with Greek mythology, you will know or recognize the story of Pandora’s Box. In the story, Pandora, in her curiosity, briefly released from the box all Disease, Sorrow, Vice, and Crime that plague humanity. Yet, among all of the evil unfurled upon humanity was Hope. And Hope’s mission was to heal the damage that was caused by the other inhabitants of the box.

This story is especially fitting for this unit on therapy and change because that is exactly what it represents: hope. With this idea in mind, you will learn about the history and modern practice of various methods of therapy, such as Psychoanalytic, Cognitive, and many others. You will also investigate the potential for change that these methods, and the therapists who practice them, bring to the millions of people who suffer everyday with emotional and mental disorders.

Final Review and Exam

3D Art I – Modeling

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This course will introduce you to 3D modeling tools and concepts. Using Blender, the popular open-source 3D modeling package, you will learn the basics of creating shapes, adding textures and lighting, and rendering. By the end of the course, you will have produced a series of increasingly sophisticated projects for your 3D portfolio. This course is suitable for students with no prior experience in 3D design or digital media authoring tools.

Units:

3D Art Overview

In this unit, you will learn what you need your computer to have in order to take the course and software you will have to download. You will also learn about creating the 3D model and navigating through 3D space.

Make a Hat

In this unit, you’ll make a hat for Suzanne the monkey.

Build a House

This unit will help you learn to build a house using basic shapes, manipulated vertices and used image files. You will also create an animation in which a camera will follow a path.

Create a Creature

In this unit, you will begin creating the creature by using a background image as a guide to get started. You will have a completed creature by applying modifiers, materials and textures you will learn about as you get through the lessons.

Animate a Character

In this unit, you will be able to make the creature you created in the previous unit walk.

Create Terrain

In this unit, you will use various tools to create a terrain with a daytime and nighttime sky.

Build a Car

In this unit, you will build a car from top to bottom. In addition, you will create asphalt for the car to drive on and make a movie of the car driving.

Make a Scene

In this unit, you will create an animated scene in which the door of the house you built in Unit 2 will open. The creature you created and rendered in Units 3 and 4 will then walk in the house.

AP Computer Science A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
The AP® Computer Science A course is equivalent to the first semester of a college level computer science course. The course involves developing the skills to write programs or part of programs to correctly solve specific problems. AP® Computer Science A also emphasizes the design issues that make programs understandable, adaptable, and when appropriate, reusable. At the same time, the development of useful computer programs and classes is used as a context for introducing other important concepts in computer science, including the development and analysis of algorithms, the development and use of fundamental data structures, and the study of standard algorithms and typical applications. In addition an understanding of the basic hardware and software components of computer systems and the responsible use of these systems are integral parts of the course.

Units:

Getting Started

Unit 1 introduces you to the themes, objectives and requirements of the course. You will download and install Java and BlueJ IDE and then write your first program to print String literals to the screen.

Arithmetic Expressions and Variables

The foundation for the rest of the course is laid in Unit 2. You will spend most of your time learning to write Strings or code that will allow you to perform various calculations and print out the results. You will also write or modify several programs to increase your comfort level and proficiency with Java.

Getting Started with Strings

In Unit 3, you will begin to dig more deeply into the Java programming language. You will crack a simple code and learn to make your programs interactive. The examples in the eIMACS lessons and the programming assessments help you to grasp the many ways that Strings can be used in computer programs.

Decisions, Decisions, Decisions

Unit 4 teaches the importance of evaluating conditions then taking action. You will learn to write programs that make decisions. The VIP Mentor in this unit personifies a theme of nutrition, exercise and general wellness.

Iterative Control Structures

In Unit 5, you will add loops to your programs as you explore how random numbers are used in simple simulations. This unit completes the introductory portion of the course.

Arrays

In Unit 6, you will begin to learn about arrays. You must prepare to discuss why lists are so important.

Methods

Unit 7 is a very important transition between simple main method programming and Object-Orientated Programming. You will learn to use Java’s Math class and how to write methods.

Object Oriented Programming

This is the longest unit in the course, and the primary topic is objects. You will now have a foundation to tackle object-oriented programming (OOP) head on. The information in this unit is very important, so be encouraged to thoroughly explore the practice exercises in the eIMACS unit, the demo programs, and the Virtual Lecture Notes in each lesson.

Analog vs. Digital

It is safe to say that you are a digital natives—you have never known a day without your computer. What better way to find full appreciation for modern marvels than to take a trip back in history, to a time before digital computers when analog ruled the world of calculation.

Semester Exam

There are no lessons in unit 10—it marks the end of Semester 1 in AP Computer Science A. There are a few tips for you before you take your exam.

AP Computer Science B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
The AP® Computer Science course is equivalent to the first semester of a college level computer science course. The course involves developing the skills to write programs or part of programs to correctly solve specific problems. AP® Computer Science also emphasizes the design issues that make programs understandable, adaptable, and when appropriate, reusable. At the same time, the development of useful computer programs and classes is used as a context for introducing other important concepts in computer science, including the development and analysis of algorithms, the development and use of fundamental data structures, and the study of standard algorithms and typical applications. In addition an understanding of the basic hardware and software components of computer systems and the responsible use of these systems are integral parts of the course.

Units:

Computing in Context

Unit 1 is the start on Semester 2 for AP Computer Science.

It is easy to connect the dots that have brought you to this point in time. World War II, Sputnik, the Space Race, the Internet, and today’s World Wide Web have interwoven technology into every fabric of society. The early 21st century will witness advances in technology unimaginable to the average citizen, raising many thorny issues that require thoughtful, intelligent, decision making. This unit will explore the privacy, security, and legal issues that come with the increasing use of technology.

Recursion

Unit 2 is all about Recursion. You will learn the concept and history behind recursion, where to find recursion in the real world, and the issues that new programmers face in taking recursion from concept to code.

Inheritance and Polymorphism

You will learn that objects can be arranged so that they do not have duplication of time and effort when writing code while studying the concepts of inheritance and polymorphism. The intro to this unit suggests that you construct a family tree with a hierarchy of inherited traits to simulate the concepts covered in this unit.

The second semester is usually a hectic time of year. Encourage yourself to set a goal to finish the course at least one month before the AP Computer Science Exam, so that you will have plenty of time to review.

Revisiting Classes

In this unit, you will expand your understanding of some previously covered topics and learn a few advanced tricks of programming within the context of cryptography, the ancient art of secret writing.

Abstraction

Sometimes there is a need for a class that serves as a model for other classes, but will not be instantiated itself. This unit is all about abstract classes.

Standard Algorithms

As you traverse through this unit, you will learn about algorithms that are useful to use and reuse in programming. Included in the unit are lessons on standard algorithms such as traversal, replacement, insertion, and deletion operations when dealing with arrays and ArrayLists. There is a quiz in the introduction to Unit 6 to refresh your memories on the topic of algorithms before you begin the lessons.

Sorting

Sorting is another class of algorithms used with arrays in addition to the basic algorithms presented in unit 6. Sorting is also a part of everyday life for most of us, like arranging items in a collection or the organization of books in a library. This unit covers four different sorting algorithms – bubble, insertion, selection and merge.

Searching

This unit covers algorithms for searching. Of the many different types of search algorithms, you will be discovering two standard ones: sequential and binary. You are getting down to your final weeks in the course so it is fitting that this unit contains an oral component.

Program Analysis

This unit deals with examining computer programs for programming correctness and program performance. This is a relatively short unit concerning new content. It deals mainly with assertions and exceptions while using Java.

Final Exam and AP Exam Review

Your are in the final unit of the second semester. You should be finished with the course material by at least April 1 in order to have plenty of time to review and prepare for the AP Exam in May. You may move through this unit according to your personal studying style. By now, you should have been using an AP Review book to prepare yourself and may use it again as you flow through this unit. In addition to your personal study aid, you are given access to two other resources, a College Board released copy of the 2004 AP Exam and free access to eIMACs highly acclaimed online review. Remind and constantly encourage yourself to use your resources to full potential, as it will greatly benefit your scores on the AP Exam.

Business Keyboarding

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
A high-speed Internet connection is necessary to download the program required for this course.

Note: This course contains applications that are not compatible with a Mac computer. The use of these applications is necessary for successful completion of this course.

Description:
In this course, the student will explore a variety of keyboarding strategies including learning the function of all the keys, how to find them quickly, and the importance of keyboarding for his future career. Major concepts of this course include the alphabetic and numeric keyboard, history of the keyboard and new technology, keyboard skill building (speed and accuracy), business ethics, formatting various academic and business documents.

Units:

Learning the Game Part 1

Learning the Game is an introduction to the course. The game motif is expanded as it relates learning a new game to learning the rules of the course and the concept of keyboarding.Welcome to the Keyboarding Game! Working through Unit 1 will be much like opening the box to a new game and learning the rules and how to use the game board and game pieces. Here, you will familiarize yourself with the basic rules of the game, including electronic communication rules (Netiquette), and begin to work on becoming accustomed to the game board. Finally, you will perform some of the beginning moves in playing the game of keyboarding. As with any game, learning the rules and becoming proficient with the moves will make playing the game easier and increase your chance of success. Remember to have fun!

Learning the Game Part 2

In Unit 1, you focused on learning the Alpha keys. In Unit 2, you will continue to practice their keying skills while learning the number keys (both alphanumeric and keypad).

Playing the Game

You have now learned the basics of proper keying. You will now begin to learn about formatting business documents while they continue to practice your keying skills using MT3. Now that you have learned the basic skills of the keyboarding game, you are ready to move on to applying those skills. In Unit 3, you will continue to practice your keyboarding skills, as well as learning proper formatting for letters, memos, and reports. In addition, you’ll spend some time learning more about your favorite game.

Games in Your Future?

This unit focuses on career choices and is referred to as a reality check (we can’t all play games for a living). You will complete an interest inventory and select a career to research. This research project will be the final project for the course, worth 20% of the course grade when combined with the timed writing score. Instead of taking a single exam at the end of the course to show that you’ve mastered all of the skills needed to play the keyboarding game, you will complete a final project. Unit 4 is that project. All of the career assignments in Unit 4 must be completed satisfactorily in order for you to receive a passing grade in this course. The tasks you will be asked to perform include all of the skills you’ve been practicing throughout the course. As in the other units of this course, you will also take a timed writing exam at the end of Unit 4. You will continue to do some skillbuilding activities to improve your speed throughout this unit.

Business Systems Technology

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
Focusing on the applications and systems used in today’s business environment, Business Systems Technology provides students with a solid foundation for understanding and using existing technologies. In addition to learning word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software, students are taught how to create databases and understand computer networking. Students also study viruses, hoaxes, and other threats to computer security.

Units:

Desktop Workplace

In the last hundred years, society has made a remarkable transition away from what historians call the Industrial Revolution toward the “Information Revolution” that has characterized the late 20th and early 21st centuries. No longer are companies limited to mass production of equipment and resources in manufacturing companies. All types of products and services are marketed and distributed over the Internet in record time. The invention of computers sparked a major information revolution that is designed to help meet the needs and challenges of businesses.The first lesson in this unit provides a brief review of the historical development of computers by scientists whose contributions created major milestones in the development of technology. The second lesson will take a closer look at the hardware components of a computer system, discuss how the parts interact during the information processing stage, and explore the design of the desktop environment. The third lesson analyzes personal computers in today’s market and reviews issues that a buyer should consider before purchasing a computer.

In the second unit, you are going to explore computer software, the vital set of instructions that is responsible for operating and controlling the computer’s hardware. There are various types of computer software programs (i.e., operating, application, and utilities software) available on the market. This unit will examine each type of software and identify examples where the applications should be applied. Lesson 1 reviews the most common types, which are operating and application software. Lesson 2 looks at utility software and its growing importance as more and more people become computer and Internet users. Finally, Lesson 3 examines information systems and resources and the software that allows these programs to operate. Although the computer that has evolved today is powerfully equipped with the latest technology–which includes the use of very large scale integrated chips, expanded memory, artificial intelligence, and greater storage capacity–the device is still just a machine that is empty and powerless unless it is programmed to resolve problems. According to Sharp (2002), “The computer does not have a brain, feelings, or the ability to solve their own problems; they can solve only those problems they have been programmed to solve.” Software programs provide the instruction to operate a computer and solve specific problems. Therefore, it is just as important to learn about software as it is to learn about hardware.

All lessons will provide general reading on a topic of interest, as well as website links that will allow you to interactively find information about specific people, places, or events. As you complete each lesson, it is very important that you keep notes of the key events that you read about. At the end of the lesson, you will complete a variety of activities and/or quizzes to assess your knowledge and understanding of computers and the technology systems that we use today.

Using Microsoft Word

Spreadsheets

Networks and Search Engines

Databases

Emergent Computer Technology

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
In this course, students learn the basics of building safe Web sites. Starting with the basic concepts of Web design (including using hypertext markup language, or HTML), students move on to planning their site and learning how to link and navigate pages. Students are introduced to more complex design techniques, including how to make sites more attractive and interesting through the use of graphics.

Units:

Introduction to Website Design

Graphics and Multimedia

Forms and Tables

Engineering Design I

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
In this introductory course you will learn computer -aided design skills necessary for a career in engineering. To this end, you will learn the basics of using CAD software to draw engineering plans and diagrams. Using CAD, you will become familiar with creating points, lines, geometric forms, drawings, and 3-D models. As you learn these basics, you’ll gain the foundation that you need to translate abstract concepts into functional designs, a core engineering skill. During this course, you will create a diverse portfolio of projects that include orthographic projections, sectional views of 3-D objects, isometric drawings, and 3-D walkthroughs. Through these projects, you’ll develop the skills you need to design and create CAD projects of your own.

Units:

Course Overview

Create Shapes

In this unit, you will learn how to set up and use CAD tools to draw lines and shapes. Using CAD, you will learn how to edit, copy, mirror, and rotate lines. You will also learn how to draw lines and shapes at specific points on other lines and shapes.

Create Orthographic Drawings

In this unit, you will learn how to create orthographic projections that show three-dimensional (3-D) objects in a two-dimensional drawing. You will learn how to define layers, dimensions, scale, and layout. You will also learn how to use visible lines, construction lines, hidden lines, and center lines. Additionally, you will draw an orthographic drawing of an object with a hole in it.

Draw Sectional Views

In this unit, you will learn how to draw sectional views of 3-D objects in CAD. You will also draw cutting plane lines that reveal the most important features of 3-D objects.

Create an Isometric Drawing

In this unit, you will analyze different types of pictorial drawings that create a realistic 3-D effect. You will also learn to use distance and angles to create isometric drawing.

Create an Oblique Drawing

In this unit, you will learn to use foreshortening to make oblique drawings look more realistic.

Create a Perspective Drawing

In this unit, you will learn about perspective drawing and vanishing points. To this end, you will analyze how vanishing points make things look realistic. You will also create a two-point perspective drawing.

Draw an Auxiliary View

In this unit, you will learn about the purpose of auxiliary views. You will also create an auxiliary view of a 3-D object.

Dimension Drawings

In this unit, you will learn and apply guidelines and CAD standards for dimensioning. You will learn to add dimensions to a rectangular block and interpret drawings with complex features. You will also learn about baseline dimensioning and use this knowledge to dimension a three-view orthographic drawing. Additionally, you will learn to apply a leader line to dimension a circle.

Create Working Drawings

In this unit, you will learn about the types of information that goes into working drawings. You will add a title block with text to a blank drawing. You will also create a bill of materials for your set of working drawings. Additionally, you will learn about working with clients, including how to save files in appropriate formats for client usage.

Create a 3-D Design

In this unit, you will learn how to navigate a 3-D CAD environment and use basic shapes to create 3-D objects. To this end, you will learn how to draw edges and surfaces in SketchUp to create a house. Additionally, you will create objects with specific dimensions—a swimming pool and a bird bath—as well as learn how to import a chair. Finally, you will learn about ways to view your design and share it with other.

Game Design

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This course is for anyone who loves gaming and wants to design games. You’ll learn how to use popular game design software to create engaging, interactive games in a variety of genres. In addition, you’ll get a solid foundation in the basic concepts of game development. By the end of this course, you will have a variety of polished games for your game development portfolio.

Units:

Game Design Overview

In this unit, you will learn what you need your computer to have in order to take the course and how to move through the course.

Ping

In this unit, you will create a two-player video game called Ping.

Ice Breakers

In this unit, you will create a one-player video game called Ice Breakers.

Cat Burglar

In this unit, you will create a one-player maze game called Cat Burglar.

Alien Attack

In this unit, you will learn how to create a one-player shooter game called Alien Attack.

Pest Busters

In this unit, you will learn how to create a one-player version and a two-player version of a shooter game called Pest Busters.

Amazon Adventure

In this unit, you will learn how to create a one-player platform game called Amazon Adventure.

HS Digital Arts I

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
In this course you will become familiar with basic concepts essentially to visual and digital art, such as line, shape, form, color, value, space, and texture. Using Inkscape, a free open-source program, you will also develop core artistic skills through the creation of original digital art. You will have the opportunity to express yourself as well through a course-long art project that involves the creation of a still life scene.

Units:

Course Overview

In this unit, you will learn how to use the course technology. You will learn how to navigate through the course, find and zip files, set up your Web browser, and complete coursework. You will also learn about using trustworthy sources, avoiding plagiarism, and making proper citations.

Introduction to Digital Art

In this unit, you will learn about basic concepts that inform visual arts, digital arts, and computer graphics. You will also start to learn how to use Inkscape, a software program for creating digital art.

Lines

In this unit, you will explore the use of lines in art. Using Inkscape, you will create different types of lines, including a special kind of curve called the Bezier Curve. You will also start an art project that you will continue to work on throughout the course. This project will involve the creation of a still life scene depicting a glass, a decanter, and a bowl of fruit.

Shape and Form

In this unit, you will explore the use of shapes and forms in art. Using Inkscape, you will create different types of shapes. You will also continue with your art project, adding shapes and forms to your still life.

Color

In this unit, you will learn how color is related to light and how color is used in art. You will use Inkscape’s color sliders to practice using color. You will also continue with your art project, adding grapes and colors to your still life.

Value

In this unit, you will learn how value, or the lightness or darkness of a color, is used in art. Using Inkscape, you will create a color value scale. You will also continue with your art project, adding value to your still life through highlights.

Space

In this unit, you will explore how space and perspective is used in art. Using Inkscape, you will draw two-dimensional objects that look three-dimensional. You will also continue with your art project. You will add a table and book to your still life to create the illusion of 3D space.

Texture

In this unit, you will explore how texture is used in art. You will create different textures using Inkscape’s filters. You will also complete your art project by adding texture to different parts of your still life.

Introduction to Computers and Applications A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
Students increase their knowledge of computer hardware, software, operating systems in this technology course. The A course covers the physical components of a computer and common hardware features, allowing students to gain knowledge helpful in evaluate and purchasing personal computers. The common features of Microsoft® Windows are also explored.

Units:

Internet Safety and Ethics

In this unit, you will learn how to use the Internet in a safe and responsible way as a tool for communication, research, and collaboration. The unit begins by explaining the concept of a virtual community and discusses topics such as online bullying and negative networking/gangs online. You will recognize Internet safety concerns including the importance of choosing a safe user name and keeping personal information safe from strangers, risks associated with online shopping, and the threat of online predators. Finally, you will learn about intellectual property and copyright concepts. You will also examine the consequences that are associated with piracy and illegal music downloading.

Hardware

Microsoft® Windows

Final Review and Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Introduction to Computers and Applications B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Students must have successfully completed Introduction to Computers and Applications A in order to take Introduction to Computers and Applications B.

To participate in this course the student must have Microsoft Office (up to the 2003 version) including Word, Excel, and PowerPoint installed on his or her machine. It should be installed before the course begins.

Description:
The second of two courses that comprise Introduction to Computers and Applications, the B course introduces students to computer applications commonly used in today’s business world. Students learn the basics of creating word processing documents, spreadsheets, databases, and slide presentations.

Units:

Internet Safety and Ethics

In this unit, you will learn how to use the Internet in a safe and responsible way as a tool for communication, research, and collaboration. The unit begins by explaining the concept of a virtual community and discusses topics such as online bullying and negative networking/gangs online. You will recognize Internet safety concerns including the importance of choosing a safe user name and keeping personal information safe from strangers, risks associated with online shopping, and the threat of online predators. Finally, you will learn about intellectual property and copyright concepts. You will also examine the consequences that are associated with piracy and illegal music downloading.

Microsoft® Word

Introduction to Microsoft® PowerPoint

Microsoft® Excel

Final Review and Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the final exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Programming I: VB.NET

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Algebra 1

Description:
Students explore the Visual Basic.NET (VB.NET) computer programming language, and use it to create a series of hands-on projects covering built-in data types, operators, control structures, classes, and objects.

Units:

Course Overview

In this introductory unit, you will be given an overview of VB.NET history and evolution.  You will learn the basic rules of good programming and discuss your knowledge and experience with programming.  You will also download the Visual Basic 2008 Express Edition program and begin to study some of its features.

Software Development and Architecture

In this unit, you will be given an overview of the Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC) and the approaches used to develop software systems.  You will learn alternatives to the SDLC including Software Prototyping, Rapid Application Development and Object-Oriented model. Additionally, you will study the basics of Program Flow, event-driven programming, and sequential programming. You will also learn about single-tier, client-server, and multi-tier architecture.

Fundamentals

In this unit you will learn the essential fundamentals of VB.Net needed in order to create your first program. You will study variables, data types, and how operators are used in VB.NET.  You will also study the basics of flow control statements and iterative statements.

Framework and Objects

In a previous unit, you learned about the processes involved in software development that are similar to plans one makes before building a house.  In this unit, you will learn about the architecture of .NET and the applications that are available to help you create your own programs.

Arraylist, Collections, Stacks and Queues

Previously, you learned about data types, variables and constants, operators, and statements.  You also began to write simple programs.  In this unit, you will learn about Arraylist, collections, stacks, and queues.  Knowing this material will improve your ability to write programs in VB.NET.

Exception Handling

This unit focuses on exception handling, which is an essential element of programming in VB.NET.  You will learn what an exception is, what exception handling is, the different types of exception handling, and how to work with exceptions.

Delegates and Events

Previously, you learned about exceptions: their types and how to handle them. With this background you can also create a program using user-defined exceptions. In this unit,  you will learn about delegates and events.

Final Project

For your final project you are going to write two complex programs. This will require you to use all concepts presented in this course from planning the project to fixing errors.

Programming II: Java

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Prerequisites:
Successful completion of Algebra 1

Description:
In this course students gain additional experience and knowledge about computer programming by learning about the Java programming  language. Students use the Java SE Development Kit to build and compile a stand-alone application. Students are introduced to built-in data types, control structures, classes, objects, inheritance, and polymorphism.

Units:

Introducing Java

In this introductory unit, you will be introduced to the Java programming language.  You will learn the history of the Java programming language from how it was developed to how it has evolved over the years. You will install Java SE Development Kit and begin to study some of its features.  Finally, you will learn and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using Java.

Basics

In this unit you will learn the basics and fundamentals of using Java; the small parts that come together to form a program. You will study the key concepts of the Java programming language: operators, iteration statements, data types, variables, conditional statements, and access modifiers.  You will also learn how Java is different from other programming languages.

Arrays

In this unit, you will be introduced to arrays and how they are used to organize objects of a similar type by putting them in a group in logical and sequential order. You will learn about the classfication of arrays, ArrayLists, sorting, and searching.  Lastly, you will write programs applying what you have learned in this unit.

OOP

In this unit you will work with a real object-oriented language and programming language where you will take full advantage of the object-oriented methodology and its capabilities for creating flexible, modular programs.  You will be introduced to classes, objects, constructors, class inheritance, object casting, abstraction, overloading, and overriding.

Strings

In this unit you will learn about Strings, which is an important concept and used in most programming languages.  You will also learn about StringBuffers and StringBuilders.  You will write two programs: one using the String class and one using the StringBuffer class.

Exception Handling, Assertions

In this unit you will study exception handling and learn about Java’s style of exception handling, which is called Assertion.  You will also learn about threading and multithreading, which are two key programming tools used in Java.

GUI Introduction

In this unit you will study the meaning of Graphical User Interface (GUI) and its basic applications.  You will learn the basics of Hyper-Text Markup Language (HTML) and practice writing HTML code.  You will gain knowledge of Applets, how they work, and their life cycle.  You will also be introduced to the Abstract Window Toolkit (AWT) as well as Events.

Final Project

For your final project you are going to write two applets to display in HTML. Doing so will require you to use concepts presented in this course from planning to fixing errors. You may also have to do some research on new codes to use.

Web Design I A

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the essentials of website design. From creating page layouts to coding with CSS and JavaScript, the student will create a complete website. Through real-world design scenarios and hands-on projects, the student will create compelling, usable websites using KompoZer, one of the Internet’s easiest to use open source editing tools.

Units:

Course Overview

In this unit, you will learn to use the Procedure Library, make your course folder and to change your folder view. Also you will learn to show file name extensions.

Favorite Page

Throughout this unit, you will create a web page while navigating in KompoZer, the website creation program used in this course. Also, you will have the opportunity to add text and images to your website.

Linked Site

In this unit you will explore setting up the navigation and color palette for your web page. You will learn to format your site and to make thumbnail images.

HTML Portfolio

In this unit, you will learn to write HTML code, add headings, and add body text to the web page.

Web Design I B

Grades: 9, 12, 10, 11

Credits: 0.50

Description:
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the essentials of web design, from creating page layouts to coding with CSS and JavaScript to create a complete website. Through real-world design scenarios and hands-on projects, the student will create compelling, usable websites using KompoZer, one of the Internet’s easiest to use open source editing tools.

Units:

Styled Site

Your web page has been created, and now you will have the opportunity to style the page as you wish. You will learn how to title and name pages as you create your navigation bar. This unit will introduce cascading style sheets (CSS) and their usage in web page creation.

CSS Code

In this unit you work exclusively with cascading styles sheets (CSS). You will explore inline, external and second style sheets.

Javascript

The final unit introduces you to JavaScript including how to add image links, dialog boxes, and rollover images to your web page. You will also be able to create dynamic web pages by the end of this unit.


5 thoughts on “HIGH SCHOOL: K to 12 Curriculum Guides – National Connections Academy

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