How to Stimulate Your Child’s Intellectual Potential

By gaby7


There is no single factor more crucial to the development of your child’s intelligence than curiosity and the urge to enquire into the nature of things. Fortunately, curiosity is a characteristic shown by almost all children who are developing normally. From the first few weeks when your baby starts exploring her surroundings with eyes, ears, fingers and mouth, she is driven by the need to discover and experience. If you feed this curiosity in an appropriate way, she will be encouraged to develop this trait.

Too many unsuitable stimuli will not have the desired effect and the child will shut them out. It is a well-known fact that most families provide an adequate environment for babies in the first month of the child’s life, but once a child becomes mobile, a number of other factors come into play, which are not conducive for optimal mental development. The parents attitude to the child’s exploration of the immediate environment, whether she is allowed to touch things, is talked to and taken out and about will all contribute to promoting the child’s curiosity or stifling it.

By the time children reach the age of two, there is usually a notable difference between those who come from privileged homes where they are talked to and encouraged to display curiosity, and those from unprivileged homes where parents are either too pressured by their own problems or believe that children should be seen and not heard.

Encouraging the inquiring mind of a child to blossom is no small task and a great deal of patience and sensitivity on the part of the parents/teachers is required. However, it is absolutely important that parents and teachers allow the unpolluted worldview of the child to blossom without too many undue prohibitions. Many dot com parents today think toys can give their children the mental curiosity they need to sharpen their intellectual potential-the truth however, is that very few toys have been developed to cater for the real intellectual development needs of a child. The responsibility of stimulating this growth still rests with the ingenuity of the parents and teachers who are the front line contacts of this child.

Don’t be misled into thinking that a child who can reel off facts or impress with the ability to count at the age of two is going to be advanced, because none of these has any bearing on the child’s future intellectual ability. You will be doing your child a far greater service if you give her practice in basic skills that are needed to master these tasks. In this way she will have a true understanding of what she is doing, not just a superficial ability that will later turn out to be unfair to her in the long run.

What Parents are strongly advised to aim to achieve with their young children is the continued pleasure and excitement of discovery which is natural in infants. One of the most interesting characteristics of children who develop successfully is their desire for discovery and enjoyment of learning and good parents simply exploit this for the intellectual benefit of their children.

Lastly, The opportunity to let off steam in outdoor play is needed. Very active children need the opportunity to use up excess energy by running, climbing, and jumping. A visit to the playground can e a sanity saver when you toddler is bursting at the seams with pent up energy. Build a sand pit at home for playtime.

mRead more:

Parental Attitudes That Help Children Grow Up Effectively

Does your child have a disturbing habit?

Children from the first few weeks of life often tend to pick up some very disturbing habits that cause concern to the parents especially. Some of these habits are nail biting, thumb sucking and hair twirling. These habits are often irritating, but they are not necessarily a sign of alarm. What most parents don’t know is the fact that children engaged in such habits derive pleasure from them and this soon become a habit.

The habits may have been started in times of stress and continued because they provide comfort and pleasure. It is not worth making a fuss about them because you will then create more tensions, which will need to be relieved by the habit and this will only create a vicious cycle around the undesirable habit. The good news for parents is that most children outgrow these habits, although a small percentage carries them on to adulthood.

Some habits are shrouded in myths and other beliefs. For example, grinding of teeth during sleep in some cultures is sometimes erroneously believed to be caused by worms, although the child may infact have worms, since they are very common in children, assuming that a child that grinds her teeth in her sleep is grossly misleading. As a habit, teeth grinding does no harm and is most likely to be outgrown.

Some kids pick their noses at night and cause serious nose bleeding in the process. You can tell the child to stop but if it is a habit built over time, your words will amount to nothing. The best thing you can do is not to admonish or scold the child-just try to lubricate the nose with petroleum jelly to keep the area moist and soft so that it is less likely to bleed if she picks off a crust.

Generally, it doesn’t make sense for parents to fuss over child habits. Controlling them without coercing the child to stop her bad ways pays off better as time is being bought to allow the child to out grow the habit.

There is a fine distinction between helping your child constructively and doing so much for her that she comes to rely on you completely. When your toddler comes to you with a problem, judge whether it is really impossible for the child to cope with it, for example, if a child came crying out to you with a tightly fitted lead, it would be better to weigh between helping the child to unscrew a tight lead and giving  a little bit of instructions  so that she is empowered to manage on her own.

It is fine to help a child in situations where she could not possibly cope and it is good to show her how things are done-explaining in simple way exactly what is happening. But let your child use you like a tool that does everything for her even when she can manage some of the tasks herself is unwise because it will increase her dependency on you and encourage clinging.   This will eventually harm the child’s self esteem.

Besides, most children tend to exhaust all possibilities offered by their home environment by the time they are three and they yearn to see new faces, new toys, and hear new versions of old tales. This is when a playground outside home or a pre-primary school can be of great benefit, because they extend not only the learning has been taking place at home, but they also provide all the important social development.

Your child could be intellectually well endowed, but unless she is able to relate to people effectively, she will sadly be as a good as handicapped. Encouraging a child to mix and match herself against others in the open market is essential for sound development.

m

Does your child have a disturbing habit?

Children from the first few weeks of life often tend to pick up some very disturbing habits that cause concern to the parents especially. Some of these habits are nail biting, thumb sucking and hair twirling. These habits are often irritating, but they are not necessarily a sign of alarm. What most parents don’t know is the fact that children engaged in such habits derive pleasure from them and this soon become a habit.

The habits may have been started in times of stress and continued because they provide comfort and pleasure. It is not worth making a fuss about them because you will then create more tensions, which will need to be relieved by the habit and this will only create a vicious cycle around the undesirable habit. The good news for parents is that most children outgrow these habits, although a small percentage carries them on to adulthood.

Some habits are shrouded in myths and other beliefs. For example, grinding of teeth during sleep in some cultures is sometimes erroneously believed to be caused by worms, although the child may infact have worms, since they are very common in children, assuming that a child that grinds her teeth in her sleep is grossly misleading. As a habit, teeth grinding does no harm and is most likely to be outgrown.

Some kids pick their noses at night and cause serious nose bleeding in the process. You can tell the child to stop but if it is a habit built over time, your words will amount to nothing. The best thing you can do is not to admonish or scold the child-just try to lubricate the nose with petroleum jelly to keep the area moist and soft so that it is less likely to bleed if she picks off a crust.

Generally, it doesn’t make sense for parents to fuss over child habits. Controlling them without coercing the child to stop her bad ways pays off better as time is being bought to allow the child to out grow the habit.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s