GRADE 3: K to 12 Curriculum Guide – National Connections Academy

National Connections Academy’s (NaCA) full course listing below is a comprehensive look at every course available for the Grade 3 level.

The push to get into the K to 12 basic education program was, to be charitable about it, in part because of the proponents’ desire to upgrade our basic education program to improve the quality/skills of our student output/graduates and in part to keep up with the Joneses. Well, the following is posted here to show us what the Joneses are doing.

WARNING!!!!!  THE FOLLOWING GRADE 3 COURSE GUIDE BY NATIONAL CONNECTIONS ACADEMY – WHICH IS NOT SANCTIONED BY DEPED — IS BEING POSTED HERE FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY:

Grade 3 Core Courses

Physical Education 3

Description:
Students enhance their personal fitness through daily participation in a variety of fitness plans, including yoga, an individual or team sport, or Connections Academy’s fitness plan.

Units:

The Presidential Fitness Challenge: Introduction

In this unit, your student will learn about the Presidential Fitness Challenge. The President’s Challenge is a program created by the United States government that rewards students for being physically active and fit. Your student will learn about the activities he can participate in, the awards that he can win, and how to keep track of his progress. By the end of this unit, your student will have taken his first step toward earning the Presidential Physical Fitness Award or the Presidential Active Lifestyle Award or he will have qualified for one.

Moving, Stretching, and Strengthening

Throughout this unit the student will demonstrate motor skills and knowledge of rules in games. In addition, the student will review how to jump rope, stretch, throw, and catch. Each lesson includes individual and partner activities. These activities may be revised or replaced to meet the needs of the student.

Developing a Healthy Exercise Routine

In this unit your student will learn the four principles of exercise: regularity, overload, specificity, and progression. He will also learn about the four components of an effective exercise routine, which are warm-up, stretching, exercise, and cool-down, and will understand why each one is important. He will then begin the suggested daily exercise activities.

Your Body and Exercise

In this unit your student will learn about how different factors affect her body during exercise. The unit explores body type and composition, proper diet and nutrition, the importance of fluids during exercise, how the human body maintains a healthy balance, and how exercise-related injuries can be prevented and cared for.

The Presidential Fitness Challenge

In this unit, your student will participate in the Presidential Fitness Challenge. The President’s Challenge is a program created by the United States government that rewards students for being physically active and fit. Your student will take part in an endurance run/walk, a shuttle run, curl-ups, push-ups, and the v-sit and reach. His best performance in each of these events will be recorded and submitted to his teacher so that he receives the appropriate recognition and award for his achievement.

Games Around the World

In this unit your student will learn about games that children play. However, the games that your student will learn are probably not ones that she has played before. Your student is going to take a look at games that children play in different countries around the world. In the first lesson, she will learn games from countries in Asia. Next she will look at games that are played in countries in Europe. The third lesson will concentrate on countries of Africa. Finally, your student will learn some games from Australia.

CD/DVD

  • Elementary Yoga DVD (set of 2)

Course Sets

  • Physical Education (3, 4, 5)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Get Fit Handbook

Supplies

  • Jump rope

Art 3

Description:
Our theme is “The Four Seasons,” featuring arts and crafts based on the characteristics of each season. Art history and art criticism are introduced, and students study the arts of various cultures. Your child will also use various media to create two- and three-dimensional projects.

Units:

Summer Strokes

In this unit, your student will explore his summer experiences while learning about basic drawing, design, and watercolor techniques. Topics include patterns, portraits, seascapes, and book arts. He will have the opportunity to draw and paint, as well as construct a book.

Autumn Arts

In this unit, your student will explore her autumn experiences while learning about basic drawing, paper construction, and clay handbuilding techniques. She will have the opportunity to draw and create three-dimensional objects. Your student will also explore basic aesthetics by describing, judging, and drawing conclusions about a historical artwork.

Winter Highlights

In this unit, your student will explore his winter experiences while learning about drawing faces, printmaking, fiber arts, and adding shadows to pictures. He will have the opportunity to draw, paint, print, and weave. Your student will also explore the artwork of an important American artist from history.

Spring into Art

In this unit, your student will explore her spring experiences while learning about basic drawing, collage, and clay handbuilding techniques. Topics include illustration, Japanese prints, weather in art, Mexican folk art, and drawing people in motion. Your student will have the opportunity to draw, paint, collage, and sculpt. She will also explore basic aesthetics by describing, judging, and drawing conclusions about a historical artwork.

Course Sets

  • Art (3, 4, 5)

Kit

  • Art 3-5 Kit

Supplies

  • Drawing pad
  • Paintbrushes (set of 5)

Gifted and Talented Language Arts 3 A

Description:
Connections Academy’s Gifted and Talented Language Arts 3 course provides students opportunities to work at an accelerated pace, while engaging in more complex and challenging instructional activities. Students are provided opportunities for increased student-teacher interaction and discussion, as well as increased interaction with their peers. This course focuses on developing critical thinking and analytical skills. Students also create compositions throughout the course by moving through the five stages of the writing process: planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing. Students continue to master the basic skills of writing with instruction in spelling, handwriting, grammar, and language usage.

Units:

Dollars and Sense

In this unit, your student will explore the theme of money’s importance in people’s lives, while also learning essential reading and writing skills. The reading selections encompass several genres, including historical fiction, fables, realistic fiction, and articles. Your student will learn and practice reading comprehension skills such as previewing a text, connecting reading to prior knowledge, understanding sequence and story structure, visualizing, and checking for comprehension. Reading instruction also addresses fluency skills such as reading with expression, and vocabulary development strategies such as using context clues and referring to a dictionary. Additionally, your student will learn the steps of the writing process and apply them in weekly writing assignments, which culminate in a narrative paragraph submitted as the first assignment for his writing portfolio. Writing models, graphic organizers, and checklists for drafting and revising are provided as support. Finally, your student will receive weekly spelling instruction, which focuses on understanding vowel and consonant patterns, as well as grammar instruction in using complete sentences and understanding different sentence types.

Smart Solutions

In this unit, your student will explore the theme of how people solve problems effectively, while building on the reading and writing skills introduced in Unit 1. This unit provides thorough instruction in reading comprehension skills, such as understanding characters, determining the main idea of fiction and nonfiction selections, asking questions while reading, and drawing conclusions. The fluency and vocabulary development strategies taught in Unit 1 are reinforced throughout the unit. Your student will further develop her writing skills by composing in a variety of forms, including a story summary submitted as part of her portfolio. Spelling instruction addresses new word patterns and endings, including compound words and words beginning with three-letter blends. Grammar instruction develops your student’s understanding of nouns by addressing topics such as common and proper nouns, singular and plural nouns, and possessive nouns.

People and Nature

In this unit, your student will explore the theme of people’s relationship to the natural world. He will read a variety of selections, including a short fiction book, Miss Rumphius; fables; a play; and nonfiction articles. Reading instruction will help your student to recognize common text structures, such as texts that compare and contrast or that show causes and effects. Your student will also become a more critical reader by learning how to understand an author’s purpose and how to make generalizations based on his reading. Throughout the unit, your student will continue to practice fluency skills and vocabulary development strategies. He will gain additional confidence as a writer as he learns to compose longer works, including a descriptive journal entry submitted as part of the writing portfolio. Spelling instruction addresses contractions, prefixes and suffixes, and silent letters. Grammar instruction focuses on verbs, including action and linking verbs, helping verbs, verb tenses, and subject-verb agreement.

Course Sets

  • GT Language Arts (3)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Gifted Language Arts 3 A and B Course Guide

Novel

  • If Your Name Was Changed at Ellis Island
  • Miss Rumphius
  • The Mouse and the Motorcycle

Online Text/eBook

  • Partial iText Scott Foresman Reading Street 3

Textbook

  • Scott Foresman Reading Street 3 (Volume 1)
  • Scott Foresman Reading Street 3 (Volume 2)

Workbook

  • Scott Foresman Practice Book 3 (Volume 1)
  • Scott Foresman Practice Book 3 (Volume 2)
  • Scott Foresman The Grammar & Writing Book 3
  • SF Phonics and Spelling Practice Book 3
  • Zaner-Bloser Handwriting 3

Gifted and Talented Language Arts 3 B

Description:
Connections Academy’s Gifted and Talented Language Arts 3 course provides students opportunities to work at an accelerated pace, while engaging in more complex and challenging instructional activities. Students are provided opportunities for increased student-teacher interaction and discussion, as well as increased interaction with their peers. This course focuses on developing critical thinking and analytical skills. Students also create compositions throughout the course by moving through the five stages of the writing process: planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing. Students continue to master the basic skills of writing with instruction in spelling, handwriting, grammar, and language usage.

Units:

One of a Kind

In this unit, your student will explore the theme of uniqueness. She will read a variety of selections, including biographies, fantasy stories, folktales, and expository articles. Reading instruction will further develop your student’s understanding of story elements—such as plot and theme—and common text structures, such as texts that compare and contrast, or that show causes and effects. Your student will practice critical reading by learning how to make generalizations, and distinguish between facts and opinions in a text. Throughout the unit, your student will continue to practice fluency skills and vocabulary development strategies. Her confidence as a writer will grow as she learns to write in different genres, including poetry and memoirs. She will write a sample of each to be submitted as part of the writing portfolio. Spelling instruction addresses irregular plurals, prefixes and suffixes, and vowel and consonant patterns. Grammar instruction focuses on pronouns, contractions, and prepositions.

Cultures

In this unit, your student will explore the theme of cultures. She will read a variety of selections, including realistic and narrative fiction. Reading instruction will futher develop your student’s understanding of story elements such as sequence and common text structures, such as text that compare and contrast. Your student will practice critical reading by learning how to draw conclusions, determine the author’s purpose, and distinguish between facts and opinions in a text. Throughout the unit, your student will continue to practice fluency skills and vocabulary development strategies. Her confidence as a writer will grow as she learns to write in different genres, including an editorial and story review. She will write an opinion essay to submit as part of the writing portfolio. Spelling instruction addresses syllables, homophones, the vowel sound in ball, and suffixes. Grammar instruction focuses on adjectives, adverbs, and conjunctions.

Freedom

In this unit, your student will explore the theme of freedom. He will read a variety of fiction and nonfiction selections, including realistic fiction, a photo essay, and fantasy stories. In addition, students will read The Mouse and the Motorcycle written by Beverly Cleary, which tells the story of a young mouse named Ralph who lives in a hotel. Reading instruction will further develop your student’s understanding of story elements, such as plot and theme, and common text structures, such as texts organized with a main idea and details or texts that show causes and effects. Your student will also become a more critical reader by learning how to make generalizations and distinguish between facts and opinions in a text. Throughout the unit, your student will continue to practice fluency skills and vocabulary development strategies. He will refine his writing skills as he writes in different genres, including an informative and a descriptive paragraph submitted as part of the writing portfolio. Spelling instruction addresses assorted vowel sounds, multisyllabic words, and related words. Grammar instruction addresses capitalization, commas, and ways to combine sentences.

Course Sets

  • GT Language Arts (3)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Gifted Language Arts 3 A and B Course Guide

Novel

  • If Your Name Was Changed at Ellis Island
  • Miss Rumphius
  • The Mouse and the Motorcycle

Online Text/eBook

  • Partial iText Scott Foresman Reading Street 3

Textbook

  • Scott Foresman Reading Street 3 (Volume 1)
  • Scott Foresman Reading Street 3 (Volume 2)

Workbook

  • Scott Foresman Practice Book 3 (Volume 1)
  • Scott Foresman Practice Book 3 (Volume 2)
  • Scott Foresman The Grammar & Writing Book 3
  • SF Phonics and Spelling Practice Book 3
  • Zaner-Bloser Handwriting 3

Gifted and Talented Literature Study 3

Description:
The Junior Great Books® program employs the method of interpretive readings and discussion being known as the Shared Inquiry™ method. This distinctive approach to learning enables leaders—the teachers and Learning Coaches—to foster a vibrant environment in which a student acquires the habits and strategies of a self-reliant thinker, reader, and learner. Through their own curiosity and attentive questioning, leaders serve as partners in inquiry with the student, helping him work with other students to discover meaning in a reading selection and to build interpretations. The process reaches its fullest expression in Shared Inquiry discussion, where leaders and students think and talk about an interpretive question that arises from a particular story. Using LiveLesson® sessions, the student will interact with peers twice during each unit for Shared Inquiry and presentation of personal writing.  Junior Great Books includes outstanding works of literature by award-winning authors. Praised for their rich language and international range, and chosen carefully for their ability to support multiple interpretations, the stories in Junior Great Books capture students’ attention and imagination and engage the best of their thinking. Progressing in reading level, conceptual complexity, and length throughout the series, the stories are the foundation for a thoughtful process of reading, discussion, and writing.

Units:

The Banza

In this unit, your student will read “The Banza,” a Haitian folktale. Your student will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate places where he is confused or curious. He will practice his critical thinking skills when he marks the story with questions during his second reading. At the end of the first lesson, your student will participate in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, your student will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. At the end of the unit, your student will share his writing with his teacher and the other students during another LiveLesson session.

The Man Whose Trade Was Tricks

In this unit, your student will read “The Man Whose Trade Was Tricks,” a Georgian folktale. Your student will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate places where she has a question. During her second reading, she will also practice her critical thinking skills by marking passages where a character does something tricky. At the end of the first lesson, your student will share her questions in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, your student will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. At the end of the unit, your student will share her writing with her teacher and the other students during another LiveLesson session.

The Fisherman and His Wife

In this unit, your student will read “The Fisherman and His Wife.” Your student will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate places where he has a question. During his second reading, he will also practice his critical thinking skills by marking passages where a character says or does something important. At the end of the first lesson, your student will share his questions in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, your student will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. At the end of the unit, your student will share his writing with his teacher and the other students during another LiveLesson session.

Ooka and the Honest Thief

In this unit, your student will read “Ooka and the Honest Thief,” a Japanese folktale. Your student will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate places where she is making connections to her own experience and knowledge. She will also practice her critical thinking skills by marking passages to indicate places where the main character is being fair or unfair. At the end of the first lesson, your student will share her questions in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, your student will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. At the end of the unit, your student will share her writing with her teacher and the other students during another LiveLesson session.

It’s All the Fault of Adam

In this unit, your student will read “It’s All the Fault of Adam,” a Nigerian folktale. Your student will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate places where he is making connections to his own experience or knowledge. During his second reading, he will also practice his critical thinking skills by marking passages to indicate the main characters motives. At the end of the first lesson, your student will share his questions in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, your student will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. At the end of the unit, your student will share his writing with his teacher and the other students during another LiveLesson session.

The Monster Who Grew Small

In this unit, your student will read “The Monster Who Grew Small.” Your student will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate places where she is making connections to her own experience and knowledge or where she has questions. She will also practice her critical thinking skills by marking passages to comment on the main character’s behavior. At the end of the first lesson, your student will share her questions in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, your student will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. At the end of the unit, your student will share her writing with her teacher and the other students during another LiveLesson session.

The Selkie Girl

In this unit, your student will read “The Selkie Girl,” a Scottish folktale. Your student will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate places where he is using his senses to visualize the story or places where he has a question. He will also practice his critical thinking skills by marking passages which may have possible multiple meanings. At the end of the first lesson, your student will share his questions in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, your student will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. At the end of the unit, your student will share his writing with his teacher and the other students during another LiveLesson session.

The Mushroom Man

In this unit, your student will read “The Mushroom Man.” Your student will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate places where she is using her senses to visualize the story or places where she has a question. She will also practice her critical thinking skills by marking passages to comment on the main character’s perceived preferences. At the end of the first lesson, your student will share her questions in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, your student will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. At the end of the unit, your student will share her writing with her teacher and the other students during another LiveLesson session.

The Princess and the Beggar

In this unit, your student will read “The Princess and the Beggar,” a Korean folktale. Your student will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate places where he is using his senses to visualize the story or places where he has a question. He will also practice his critical thinking skills by marking passages which give insight into the characters. At the end of the first lesson, your student will share his questions in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, your student will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. At the end of the unit, your student will share his writing with his teacher and the other students during another LiveLesson session.

The Fire on the Mountain

In this unit, your student will read “The Fire on the Mountain,” an Ethiopian folktale. Your student will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate places where she is using her senses to visualize the story or places where she has a question. She will also practice her critical thinking skills by marking passages to comment on the characters’ integrity. At the end of the first lesson, your student will share her questions in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, your student will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. At the end of the unit, your student will share her writing with her teacher and the other students during another LiveLesson session.

Course Sets

  • GT Literature Study 3

Textbook

  • JGB Series 3 Anthology Book One

Workbook

  • JGB Series 3 Reader’s Journal Book One

Language Arts 3 A

Description:
Building on foundational reading skills, this course focuses on developing critical thinking and analytical skills. Students examine the author’s purpose and point of view and practice comprehension and phonics skills through daily reading exercises. Students learn to structure and write complete sentences and then create paragraphs and longer compositions. Throughout the course, students create compositions by moving through the five stages of the writing process: planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing. Students continue to master the basic skills of writing with instruction in spelling, handwriting, grammar, and language usage.

Units:

Dollars and Sense

In this unit, your student will explore the theme of money’s importance in people’s lives while learning essential reading and writing skills. The reading selections encompass several genres, including historical fiction, fables, realistic fiction, and articles. Your student will learn and practice reading comprehension skills, such as previewing a text, connecting reading to prior knowledge, understanding sequence and story structure, visualizing, and checking for comprehension. Reading instruction also addresses fluency skills, such as reading with expression, and vocabulary development strategies, such as using context clues and referring to a dictionary. Additionally, your student will learn the steps of the writing process and apply them in weekly writing assignments, which culminate in a narrative paragraph submitted as the first assignment for his writing portfolio. Writing models, graphic organizers, and checklists for drafting and revising are provided as support. Finally, your student will receive weekly spelling instruction, which focuses on understanding vowel and consonant patterns, as well as grammar instruction in using complete sentences and understanding different sentence types.

Smart Solutions

In this unit, your student will explore the theme of how people solve problems effectively, while building on the reading and writing skills introduced in Unit 1. In addition to the selections presented in Reading Street, your student will read a short nonfiction book, Ben Franklin and the Magic Squares. This unit provides thorough instruction in reading comprehension skills, such as understanding characters, determining the main idea of fiction and nonfiction selections, asking questions while reading, and drawing conclusions. The fluency and vocabulary development strategies taught in Unit 1 are reinforced throughout the unit. Your student will further develop her writing skills by composing in a variety of forms, including a story summary and a problem-solution paragraph submitted as part of her portfolio. Spelling instruction addresses new word patterns and endings, including compound words and words beginning with three-letter blends. Grammar instruction develops your student’s understanding of nouns by addressing topics such as common and proper nouns, singular and plural nouns, and possessive nouns.

People and Nature

In this unit, your student will explore the theme of people’s relationship to the natural world. He will read a variety of selections, including a short fiction book, Miss Rumphius, fables, a play, and nonfiction articles. Reading instruction will help your student to recognize common text structures, such as texts that compare and contrast or that show causes and effects. Your student will also become a more critical reader by learning how to understand an author’s purpose and how to make generalizations based on his reading. Throughout the unit, your student will continue to practice fluency skills and vocabulary development strategies. He will gain additional confidence as a writer as he learns to compose longer works, including a descriptive journal entry and a news story submitted as part of the writing portfolio. Spelling instruction addresses contractions, prefixes and suffixes, and silent letters. Grammar instruction focuses on verbs, including action and linking verbs, helping verbs, verb tenses, and subject-verb agreement.

Course Sets

  • Language Arts (3)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Language Arts 3 A and B Course Guide

Novel

  • Ben Franklin and the Magic Squares
  • Miss Rumphius
  • The Mouse and the Motorcycle

Online Text/eBook

  • Partial iText Scott Foresman Reading Street 3

Textbook

  • Scott Foresman Reading Street 3 (Volume 1)
  • Scott Foresman Reading Street 3 (Volume 2)

Workbook

  • Scott Foresman Practice Book 3 (Volume 1)
  • Scott Foresman Practice Book 3 (Volume 2)
  • Scott Foresman The Grammar & Writing Book 3
  • SF Phonics and Spelling Practice Book 3
  • Zaner-Bloser Handwriting 3

Language Arts 3 B

Description:
Building on foundational reading skills, this course focuses on developing critical thinking and analytical skills. Students examine the author’s purpose and point of view and practice comprehension and phonics skills through daily reading exercises. Students learn to structure and write complete sentences and then create paragraphs and longer compositions. Throughout the course, students create compositions by moving through the five stages of the writing process: planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing. Students continue to master the basic skills of writing with instruction in spelling, handwriting, grammar, and language usage.

Units:

One of a Kind

In this unit, your student will explore the theme of uniqueness. She will read a variety of selections, including biographies, fantasy stories, folktales, and expository articles. Reading instruction will further develop your student’s understanding of story elements—such as plot and theme—and common text structures, such as texts that compare and contrast, or that show causes and effects. Your student will practice critical reading by learning how to make generalizations, and distinguish between facts and opinions in a text. Throughout the unit, your student will continue to practice fluency skills and vocabulary development strategies. Her confidence as a writer will grow as she learns to write in different genres, including poetry and memoirs. She will write a sample of each to be submitted as part of the writing portfolio. Spelling instruction addresses irregular plurals, prefixes and suffixes, and vowel and consonant patterns. Grammar instruction focuses on pronouns, contractions, and prepositions.

Cultures

In this unit, your student will explore the theme of cultures. She will read a variety of selections, including realistic and narrative fiction. Reading instruction will further develop your student’s understanding of story elements—such as sequence—and common text structures, such as texts that compare and contrast. Your student will practice critical reading by learning how to draw conclusions, determine the author’s purpose, and distinguish between facts and opinions in a text. Throughout the unit, your student will continue to practice fluency skills and vocabulary development strategies. Her confidence as a writer will grow as she learns to write in different genres, including an editorial and a story review. She will write an opinion essay to submit as part of the writing portfolio. Spelling instruction addresses syllables, homophones, the vowel sound in ball, and suffixes. Grammar instruction focuses on adjectives, adverbs, and conjunctions.

Freedom

In this unit, your student will explore the theme of freedom. He will read a variety of fiction and nonfiction selections, including narrative nonfiction, a photo essay, a fantasy story, and a novel. Reading instruction in the first half of this unit will further develop your student’s understanding of story elements, such as plot and theme, and common text structures, such as texts organized with a main idea and details. Your student will also become a more critical reader by learning how to distinguish between facts and opinions in a text.

In the second half of this unit, your student will read the novel The Mouse and the Motorcycle by Beverly Cleary. The Mouse and the Motorcycle tells the story of a young mouse named Ralph who lives in a hotel. One day, upon noticing that a boy left his toy motorcycle behind, Ralph decides to take a ride—a decision that leads to many adventures. This exciting story provides your student with the opportunity to apply previously learned reading skills to longer works while also enhancing his understanding of story elements. As your student reads The Mouse and the Motorcycle, he will identify literary elements, analyze characters, and use comprehension strategies to make connections and draw conclusions.

Throughout the unit, your student will continue to practice fluency skills and vocabulary development strategies. He will refine his writing skills as he writes in different genres, including an informative and a descriptive paragraph submitted as part of the writing portfolio. Spelling instruction addresses vowel sounds, suffixes, and multisyllabic words. Grammar instruction addresses capitalization, commas, and ways to combine sentences.

Course Sets

  • Language Arts (3)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Language Arts 3 A and B Course Guide

Novel

  • Ben Franklin and the Magic Squares
  • Miss Rumphius
  • The Mouse and the Motorcycle

Online Text/eBook

  • Partial iText Scott Foresman Reading Street 3

Textbook

  • Scott Foresman Reading Street 3 (Volume 1)
  • Scott Foresman Reading Street 3 (Volume 2)

Workbook

  • Scott Foresman Practice Book 3 (Volume 1)
  • Scott Foresman Practice Book 3 (Volume 2)
  • Scott Foresman The Grammar & Writing Book 3
  • SF Phonics and Spelling Practice Book 3
  • Zaner-Bloser Handwriting 3

Gifted and Talented Math 3 A

Description:
For qualifying students, this first-semester course reviews strategies for adding and subtracting numbers with regrouping; and introduces a variety of methods for multiplication and division providing students with a conceptual understanding of the operations and how they affect numbers. In addition to the models and algorithms, gifted students examine how the basic operations connect to beginning Algebra skills, building a foundation for later studies. By extending number theory lessons to include larger numbers, additional decimal places, a mental math strategies, students are able to master content beyond the third grade standards. Students study time, money, fractions, decimals, measurement, and relationships among patterns. Students have the opportunity to study geometry concepts, including lines, angles, shapes, perimeter, area, congruence, and similarity. Students are also introduced to equations, statistics using data and graphing techniques, and probability concepts. Differentiating from the core content, students apply the basic math skills to novel situations using a variety of problem solving skills with real world applications.

Objectives derived from Pearson Education programs © Pearson Education, Inc., or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

Units:

Numeration

This unit reinforces a solid comprehension of the base-ten numeration system. Previously, your student used his understanding of place value to read and write two-digit numbers. As your student delves deeper into place value throughout this course, he will extend his ability to read, comprehend, order, and represent larger numbers in a variety of ways. Manipulatives will play a key role in developing your student’s understanding of numbers in the hundreds and thousands place values. Proficiency of the concepts presented in this unit will provide your student with the foundation to grasp more complex math concepts. Finally, your student will explore strategies to count money and make change using real-world scenarios. This unit’s problem solving strategy is “make an organized list.”

Adding Whole Numbers

In this unit, your student will use her knowledge and skills of basic addition facts to add whole numbers of greater value. As your student learns to estimate and compute sums of numbers less than 1,000, she will use her background knowledge of place value to model the process of regrouping in the ones and tens place values. Several properties of addition are introduced to further develop your student’s addition strategies. This unit will provide your student with meaningful computational practice through word problems that are presented in authentic contexts. The problem-solving strategy that will be introduced to your student is “draw a picture.”

Subtraction Number Sense

In this unit, your student will explore the meaning of subtraction through several types of situations, including taking away and comparing. Fact families, modeling, and mental math are presented to provide your student with multiple strategies in basic facts mastery, estimation, and computing differences. This unit’s problem-solving strategy is “reasonableness.”

Subtracting Whole Numbers to Solve Problems

In this unit, your student’s knowledge and skills in basic facts will support her as she learns to compute differences of whole numbers that are less than 1,000. Your student will use manipulatives and her knowledge of place value to model the process of regrouping in the ones, tens, and hundreds place values. The use of manipulatives is one method for your student to visualize the process of subtraction with regrouping. Your student will also learn the algorithmic process of subtraction with regrouping. Finally, your student will practice her computational skills through word problems that are presented in authentic contexts. The problem-solving strategy that will be introduced to your student is “draw a picture and write a number sentence.”

Multiplication Meanings and Facts

In this unit, your student will revisit the concepts of equal groups and skip counting as he equates multiplication to repeated addition. Before your student practices the basic multiplication facts for mastery, it is important that he masters the strategies for knowing how to multiply. Thus, your student will make arrays and use counters to model how multiplication works. In addition, your student will learn to write personal multiplication stories in order to demonstrate a multiplication fact. After your student is introduced to the concept and process of multiplication, he will learn some of the basic multiplication facts. Specifically, the strategies of using patterns and applying properties of multiplication will be used to multiply with the numbers 0, 1, 2, 5, 9, and 10. The problem solving strategies in this unit are “writing to explain” and “two-question problems.”

Multiplication Fact Strategies: Use Known Facts

This unit continues to provide your student with multiple strategies to learn her basic multiplication facts before committing them to memory. Your student will learn to use the “break apart” and “known-facts” strategies for multiplication facts in which the numbers 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 11, and 12 are factors. Your student will be introduced to the Associative Property of Multiplication and will use the property to multiply numbers with three factors. By the end of this unit, your student will know the basic multiplication facts up to 12. Your student should continue to practice these basic multiplication facts throughout the year to ensure that she mastered the concept. The problem-solving strategy in this unit is “multiple-step problems.”

Division Meanings

In this unit, your student will explore two interpretations of division: division as sharing and division as repeated subtraction. Your student will make arrays, use counters, and draw pictures to model division. Your student will encounter remainders in some of the division problems presented in this unit. The use of arrays and counters will enable him to visualize remainders. Your student will learn how to analyze a word problem in order to interpret how the remainder will be displayed in the problem. Finally, your student will learn to write and solve his own division stories. The problem-solving strategy in this unit is “use objects and draw a picture.”

Divison Facts

In this unit, your student will learn that, like addition and subtraction, multiplication and division have an inverse relationship; this means that their operations undo each other. Subsequently, your student will be able to produce related multiplication and division facts, or fact families. A strong knowledge of basic multiplication facts will lend the use of fact families as an efficient strategy for learning division facts. Other useful strategies that your student will continue to use to explore division concepts are pictures and counters. This unit provides your student with instruction on division facts from zero to nine. Continued practice throughout the year will enhance her memory of the facts. This unit’s problem-solving strategy is “draw a picture and write a number sentence.”

Patterns and Relationships

In this unit, your student will learn to identify, describe, extend, and write a rule for a variety of nonnumeric and numeric patterns that repeat in predictable ways. He will also learn that patterns between pairs of numbers exist when they are related by multiplication, addition, or subtraction. Your student will encounter such related numbers in two-column or two-row tables. Given the value of one of the numbers, your student will learn to find the value of the other number by writing a rule for the relationship and thereby extending the table. In addition, your student will use his knowledge of numbers and operation symbols to translate words from a given mathematical scenario into a numerical expression. He will also develop skills in comparing numerical expressions. The problem-solving strategy is “act it out and use reasoning.”

Solids and Shapes

In this unit, your student will learn to identify, describe, and classify two-dimensional objects, referred to as shapes or polygons, and three-dimensional objects, or solid figures, based on the similarities and differences between their attributes. Your student will also learn about points and lines, the building blocks used to describe polygons and solid figures. She will recognize that while a point has no size, a set of points that extend in opposite directions form a straight line and two lines joined at a point result in an angle. Relationships between these building blocks result in the formation of several types of lines and angles. These lines and angles help constitute polygons and solid figures in unique ways. This unit is rich in mathematical terminology. Relating the vocabulary to as many real-life examples will help your student gain familiarity with the terms. The problem-solving strategy for this unit is “make and test generalizations.”

Transformations, Congruence and Symmetry

This unit will provide your student with opportunities to explore congruence and symmetry of a variety of shapes. As your student investigates whether a shape is congruent, he will ask key questions about each shape, including: “Are the figures the same size?” and “Do they have the same shape?” While studying the three ways a figure can move, he will have opportunities to draw congruent shapes. When your student investigates the symmetry of shapes, he will ask, “Do the parts match exactly?” Eventually, your student will have the opportunity to create figures with one or more lines of symmetry. The problem-solving strategy in this unit is “use objects.”

Course Sets

  • GT Math (3)

Kit

  • Math 3-5 Kit

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Gifted and Talented Math 3 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Scott Foresman enVisionMATH 3
  • iText Scott Foresman enVisionMATH 4

Supplies

  • Base-ten flats, green (1 set)
  • Base-ten rods, green (10)
  • Base-ten units, green (20 cubes)
  • Coins (44)
  • Counters, 2-color (20)
  • Dollar bills (40)
  • Game spinner, blank (1)
  • Number cubes, blank with 50 labels (2)
  • Tiles, color (20)
  • Tiles, fraction (51)

Workbook

  • SF enVisionMATH 3 Interactive Homework Workbook
  • SF enVisionMATH 4 Interactive Homework Workbook

Gifted and Talented Math 3 B

Description:
For qualifying students, this second-semester course reviews strategies for adding and subtracting numbers with regrouping; and introduces a variety of methods for multiplication and division providing students with a conceptual understanding of the operations and how they affect numbers. In addition to the models and algorithms, gifted students examine how the basic operations connect to beginning Algebra skills, building a foundation for later studies. By extending number theory lessons to include larger numbers, additional decimal places, a mental math strategies, students are able to master content beyond the third grade standards. Students study time, money, fractions, decimals, measurement, and relationships among patterns. Students have the opportunity to study geometry concepts, including lines, angles, shapes, perimeter, area, congruence, and similarity. Students are also introduced to equations, statistics using data and graphing techniques, and probability concepts. Differentiating from the core content, students apply the basic math skills to novel situations using a variety of problem solving skills with real world applications.

Objectives derived from Pearson Education programs © Pearson Education, Inc., or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

Units:

Understanding Fractions

In this unit, your student will use manipulatives to represent fractions of a region and fractions of a set. The use of manipulatives will help your student develop proficiency in understanding how to identify, compare, and order fractions. Your student will also use models, pictures, and fraction strips to find equivalent fractions and to add and subtract fractions. Future math courses will use the basic fraction skills presented in this unit and apply them throughout all branches of mathematics, including measurement, geometry, probability, and statistics. Relating fractions to as many real-life examples will help your student gain familiarity with the concepts presented in this unit. The problem-solving strategy in this unit is “make a table and look for a pattern.”

Decimals and Money

In this unit, your student will extend his knowledge of whole number place values to include decimal place values. He will use models to represent tenths, hundredths, equivalent fractions, and decimals. The models will help your student to visualize how fractions and decimals show equal parts of a whole. Your student will also use other manipulative tools, such as bills and coins, to understand decimals. By exploring how a penny is one hundredth of a dollar, your student will recognize the relationships between money, decimal place values, and fractions of a dollar. Your student will build on his knowledge of addition and subtraction with regrouping to solve problems involving money. Throughout this unit, adding and subtracting money serves as a model for adding and subtracting decimals. Your student will learn that the only difference between the processes is to include the dollar sign when he solves a money problem. The problem-solving strategies in this unit are “draw a picture and write a number sentence” and “missing or extra information.”

Understanding Decimals

In this unit, your student will read and write decimals to the hundredths place in expanded, standard, and word form. Models of hundredths and place-value charts will help your student to understand the value that is represented by a decimal, which will allow her to compare and order decimals. Your student will learn to write decimals and fractions interchangeably and graph them on a number line. Additionally, your student will learn to write decimals and mixed numbers interchangeably and graph them on a number line. The problem-solving strategy in this unit is “draw a table.”

Customary Measurement

In this unit, your student will learn to estimate, measure, and select appropriate tools and units for length, capacity, and weight in the customary system. At the beginning of this unit, your student will measure length with nonstandard units. This process illustrates to your student the need for standard units of measurement. Then your student will measure lengths of objects using standard units of measurement. Once your student has practiced measuring to the nearest inch, she will learn how to measure with greater precision by finding length to the nearest one-half inch and one-fourth inch. Your student will continue her study of measurement by changing customary units of length. Throughout this topic, each unit of measurement is compared to a real-life object. The particular object serves as a benchmark that your student can use to estimate the length, capacity, and length of an object before she measures it. Finally, your student will determine whether her estimate seems reasonable. This unit’s problem-solving strategy is “act it out and use reasoning.”

Metric Measurement

In this unit, your student will learn to estimate, measure, and select appropriate tools and units for length, capacity, and mass in the metric system. Your student may remember the pattern of the base ten numeration system when he discovers that the metric system of measurement is based on powers of 10. Your student will also convert metric units of length. When each unit of measurement is introduced throughout this unit, each unit is compared to a real-life object. The object serves as a benchmark that your student can use to estimate the length, capacity, and length of an object before he measures it. Finally, your student will determine whether his estimate seems reasonable. This unit’s problem-solving strategy is “make a table and look for a pattern.”

Perimeter, Area, and Volume

In this unit, your student will learn that the distance around a plane shape is its perimeter. She will explore several strategies for calculating perimeter. Your student will investigate how to make a shape with a given perimeter and how different shapes can have the same perimeter. Then your student will explore the concept of area, which is the space inside a plane shape. Your student will solve problems involving area, and represent the answer using square units. She will learn the process of estimating and finding the area of regular and irregular shapes. Next your student will learn about volume, which is the space inside a solid shape. Your student will estimate and solve volume problems and represent the answer using cubic units. The problem-solving strategies in this unit are “try, check, and revise” and “solve a simpler problem.”

Time and Temperature

In this unit, your student will solve many real-life problems involving time and temperature. Your student will learn how to tell time to the half hour, quarter hour, and to the minute on both analog and digital clocks. Your student’s knowledge of counting by fives and by ones will help your student measure time on an analog clock, while his understanding of fractions will support his comprehension of the terms “half hour” and “quarter hour.” Your student will also convert units of time and determine elapsed time. For problems involving temperature, your student will read thermometers and learn the benchmarks for freezing and boiling water in degrees Fahrenheit and degrees Celsius. These benchmarks will help your student connect appropriate temperatures for given real-world activities. The problem-solving strategy in this unit is “work backward.”

Multiplying Greater Numbers

This unit extends your student’s multiplication skills beyond basic facts. Your student will explore several new strategies to estimate and multiply 2- and 3-digit numbers by a 1-digit number. Some strategies include the use of patterns, rounding rules, breaking large numbers apart, and following an expanded algorithm. Manipulatives, such as place-value blocks, arrays, or counters will continue to serve as physical hands-on learning tools for your student. The problem-solving strategy in this unit is “draw a picture and write a number sentence.”

Dividing with 1-Digit Numbers

In this unit, your student will extend his division skills beyond basic facts to solve problems involving multi-digit dividends. Your student will explore multiple strategies to support his comprehension and skill development in this area. Your student will use mental math strategies and make estimates before finding actual quotients in order to ensure reasonable solutions. In addition, your student will explore the division algorithm and use it to divide numbers with a remainder. Manipulatives, such as place-value blocks, arrays, or counters will continue to serve as physical hands-on learning tools for your student. This unit’s problem-solving strategy is “multiple-step problems.”

Data, Graphs, and Probability

In this unit, your student will collect, organize, display, analyze, and interpret real-world data. Your student will collect data in an organized way by using a tally chart. Once the data has been gathered, your student will display the data in pictographs and bar graphs in order to read and interpret the information. Your student will also read and use line graphs. While pictographs and bar graphs compare data, your student will determine that line graphs show how data changes over time. The next part of this unit focuses on probability. Your student will engage in experiments, list possible outcomes for an event, describe the likelihood of an event, and make predictions about an experiment. The line plot will be introduced as a way to display comparisons between data and as a tool to predict future results. The problem-solving strategy in this unit is “use tables and graphs to draw conclusions.”

Course Sets

  • GT Math (3)

Kit

  • Math 3-5 Kit

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Gifted and Talented Math 3 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Scott Foresman enVisionMATH 3
  • iText Scott Foresman enVisionMATH 4

Supplies

  • Base-ten flats, green (1 set)
  • Base-ten rods, green (10)
  • Base-ten units, green (20 cubes)
  • Coins (44)
  • Counters, 2-color (20)
  • Dollar bills (40)
  • Game spinner, blank (1)
  • Number cubes, blank with 50 labels (2)
  • Tiles, color (20)
  • Tiles, fraction (51)

Workbook

  • SF enVisionMATH 3 Interactive Homework Workbook
  • SF enVisionMATH 4 Interactive Homework Workbook

Math 3 A

Description:
Third grade Math continues to teach strategies for adding and subtracting numbers with regrouping. Multiplication and division are introduced to provide students with a conceptual understanding of the operations and how they affect numbers. Students will also learn how to add and subtract decimals using money, create graphs, and perform experiments in probability using basic statistics methods. Students also study time, money, geometry, fractions, decimals, measurement, and relationships among patterns.

Units:

Numeration

This unit reinforces a solid comprehension of the base-ten numeration system. Previously, your student used his understanding of place value to read and write two-digit numbers. As your student delves deeper into place value throughout this course, he will extend his ability to read, comprehend, order, and represent larger numbers in a variety of ways. Manipulatives will play a key role in developing your student’s understanding of numbers in the hundreds and thousands place values. Proficiency of the concepts presented in this unit will provide your student with the foundation to grasp more complex math concepts. Finally, your student will explore strategies to count money and make change using real-world scenarios. This unit’s problem solving strategy is “make an organized list.”

Adding Whole Numbers

In this unit, your student will use her knowledge and skills of basic addition facts to add whole numbers of greater value. As your student learns to estimate and compute sums of numbers less than 1,000, she will use her background knowledge of place value to model the process of regrouping in the ones and tens place values. Several properties of addition are introduced to further develop your student’s addition strategies. This unit will provide your student with meaningful computational practice through word problems that are presented in authentic contexts. The problem-solving strategy that will be introduced to your student is “draw a picture.”

Subtraction

In this unit, your student’s knowledge and skills in basic facts will support her as she learns to compute differences of whole numbers that are less than 1,000. Your student will use manipulatives and her knowledge of place value to model the process of regrouping in the ones, tens, and hundreds place values. The use of manipulatives is one method for your student to visualize the process of subtraction with regrouping. Your student will also learn the algorithmic process of subtraction with regrouping. Finally, your student will practice her computational skills through word problems that are presented in authentic contexts. The problem-solving strategy that will be introduced to your student is “draw a picture and write a number sentence.”

Multiplication Meanings and Facts

In this unit, your student will revisit the concepts of equal groups and skip counting as he equates multiplication to repeated addition. Before your student practices the basic multiplication facts for mastery, it is important that he masters the strategies for knowing how to multiply. Thus, your student will make arrays and use counters to model how multiplication works. In addition, your student will learn to write personal multiplication stories in order to demonstrate a multiplication fact. After your student is introduced to the concept and process of multiplication, he will learn some of the basic multiplication facts. Specifically, the strategies of using patterns and applying properties of multiplication will be used to multiply with the numbers 0, 1, 2, 5, 9, and 10. The problem solving strategies in this unit are “writing to explain” and “two-question problems.”

Multiplication Fact Strategies: Use Known Facts

This unit continues to provide your student with multiple strategies to learn her basic multiplication facts before committing them to memory. Your student will learn to use the “break apart” and “known-facts” strategies for multiplication facts in which the numbers 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 11, and 12 are factors. Your student will be introduced to the Associative Property of Multiplication and will use the property to multiply numbers with three factors. By the end of this unit, your student will know the basic multiplication facts up to 12. Your student should continue to practice these basic multiplication facts throughout the year to ensure that she mastered the concept. The problem-solving strategy in this unit is “multiple-step problems.”

Division

In this unit, your student will explore two interpretations of division: division as sharing and division as repeated subtraction. Your student will make arrays, use counters, and draw pictures to model division. Your student will encounter remainders in some of the division problems presented in this unit. The use of arrays and counters will enable him to visualize remainders. Your student will learn how to analyze a word problem in order to interpret how the remainder will be displayed in the problem. Finally, your student will learn to write and solve his own division stories. The problem-solving strategy in this unit is “use objects and draw a picture.”

Patterns and Relationships

In this unit, your student will learn to identify, describe, extend, and write a rule for a variety of nonnumeric and numeric patterns that repeat in predictable ways. He will also learn that patterns between pairs of numbers exist when they are related by multiplication, addition, or subtraction. Your student will encounter such related numbers in two-column or two-row tables. Given the value of one of the numbers, your student will learn to find the value of the other number by writing a rule for the relationship and thereby extending the table. In addition, your student will use his knowledge of numbers and operation symbols to translate words from a given mathematical scenario into a numerical expression. He will also develop skills in comparing numerical expressions. The problem-solving strategy is “act it out and use reasoning.”

Solids and Shapes

In this unit, your student will learn to identify, describe, and classify two-dimensional objects, referred to as shapes or polygons, and three-dimensional objects, or solid figures, based on the similarities and differences between their attributes. Your student will also learn about points and lines, the building blocks used to describe polygons and solid figures. She will recognize that while a point has no size, a set of points that extend in opposite directions form a straight line and two lines joined at a point result in an angle. Relationships between these building blocks result in the formation of several types of lines and angles. These lines and angles help constitute polygons and solid figures in unique ways. This unit is rich in mathematical terminology. Relating the vocabulary to as many real-life examples will help your student gain familiarity with the terms. The problem-solving strategy for this unit is “make and test generalizations.”

Course Sets

  • Math (3)

Kit

  • Math 3-5 Kit

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Math 3 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Scott Foresman enVisionMATH 3

Supplies

  • Base-ten flats, green (1 set)
  • Base-ten rods, green (10)
  • Base-ten units, green (20 cubes)
  • Coins (44)
  • Counters, 2-color (20)
  • Dollar bills (40)
  • Game spinner, blank (1)
  • Number cubes, blank with 50 labels (2)
  • Tiles, color (20)
  • Tiles, fraction (51)

Workbook

  • SF enVisionMATH 3 Interactive Homework Workbook

Math 3 B

Description:
Third grade Math continues to teach strategies for adding and subtracting numbers with regrouping. Multiplication and division are introduced to provide students with a conceptual understanding of the operations and how they affect numbers. Students will also learn how to add and subtract decimals using money, create graphs, and perform experiments in probability using basic statistics methods. Students also study time, money, geometry, fractions, decimals, measurement, and relationships among patterns.

Units:

Congruence and Symmetry

This unit will provide your student with opportunities to explore congruence and symmetry of a variety of shapes. As your student investigates whether a shape is congruent, he will ask key questions about each shape, including: “Are the figures the same size?” and “Do they have the same shape?” While studying the three ways a figure can move, he will have opportunities to draw congruent shapes. When your student investigates the symmetry of shapes, he will ask, “Do the parts match exactly?” Eventually, your student will have the opportunity to create figures with one or more lines of symmetry. The problem-solving strategy in this unit is “use objects.”

Understanding Fractions

In this unit, your student will use manipulatives to represent fractions of a region and fractions of a set. The use of manipulatives will help your student develop proficiency in understanding how to identify, compare, and order fractions. Your student will also use models, pictures, and fraction strips to find equivalent fractions and to add and subtract fractions. Future math courses will use the basic fraction skills presented in this unit and apply them throughout all branches of mathematics, including measurement, geometry, probability, and statistics. Relating fractions to as many real-life examples will help your student gain familiarity with the concepts presented in this unit. The problem-solving strategy in this unit is “make a table and look for a pattern.”

Decimals and Money

In this unit, your student will extend his knowledge of whole number place values to include decimal place values. He will use models to represent tenths, hundredths, equivalent fractions, and decimals. The models will help your student to visualize how fractions and decimals show equal parts of a whole. Your student will also use other manipulative tools, such as bills and coins, to understand decimals. By exploring how a penny is one hundredth of a dollar, your student will recognize the relationships between money, decimal place values, and fractions of a dollar. Your student will build on his knowledge of addition and subtraction with regrouping to solve problems involving money. Throughout this unit, adding and subtracting money serves as a model for adding and subtracting decimals. Your student will learn that the only difference between the processes is to include the dollar sign when he solves a money problem. The problem-solving strategies in this unit are “draw a picture and write a number sentence” and “missing or extra information.”

Customary and Metric Measurement

In this unit, your student will learn to estimate, measure, and select appropriate tools and units for length, capacity, mass, and weight in the customary and metric systems. At the beginning of this unit, your student will measure length with nonstandard units. This process illustrates to your student the need for standard units of measurement.  Your student will continue her study of measurement by changing customary and metric units of length. Throughout this topic, each unit of measurement is compared to a real-life object. The particular object serves as a benchmark that your student can use to estimate the length, capacity, and length of an object before she measures it. Finally, your student will determine whether her estimate seems reasonable.

Perimeter, Area, and Volume

In this unit, your student will learn that the distance around a plane shape is its perimeter. He will explore several strategies for calculating perimeter. Your student will investigate how to make a shape with a given perimeter and how different shapes can have the same perimeter. Then your student will explore the concept of area, which is the space inside a plane shape. Your student will solve problems involving area, and represent the answer using square units. He will learn the process of estimating and finding the area of regular and irregular shapes. Next your student will learn about volume, which is the space inside a solid shape. Your student will estimate and solve volume problems and represent the answer using cubic units. The problem-solving strategies in this unit are “try, check, and revise” and “solve a simpler problem.”

Time and Temperature

In this unit, your student will solve many real-life problems involving time and temperature. Your student will learn how to tell time to the half hour, quarter hour, and to the minute on both analog and digital clocks. Your student’s knowledge of counting by fives and by ones will help your student measure time on an analog clock, while her understanding of fractions will support her comprehension of the terms “half hour” and “quarter hour.” Your student will also convert units of time and determine elapsed time. For problems involving temperature, your student will read thermometers and learn the benchmarks for freezing and boiling water in degrees Fahrenheit and degrees Celsius. These benchmarks will help your student connect appropriate temperatures for given real-world activities. The problem-solving strategy in this unit is “work backward.”

Multiplying Greater Numbers

This unit extends your student’s multiplication skills beyond basic facts. Your student will explore several new strategies to estimate and multiply 2- and 3-digit numbers by a 1-digit number. Some strategies include the use of patterns, rounding rules, breaking large numbers apart, and following an expanded algorithm. Manipulatives, such as place-value blocks, arrays, or counters will continue to serve as physical hands-on learning tools for your student. The problem-solving strategy in this unit is “draw a picture and write a number sentence.”

Dividing with 1-Digit Numbers

In this unit, your student will extend her division skills beyond basic facts to solve problems involving multi-digit dividends. Your student will explore multiple strategies to support her comprehension and skill development in this area. Your student will use mental math strategies and make estimates before finding actual quotients in order to ensure reasonable solutions. In addition, your student will explore the division algorithm and use it to divide numbers with a remainder. Manipulatives, such as place-value blocks, arrays, or counters will continue to serve as physical hands-on learning tools for your student. This unit’s problem-solving strategy is “multiple-step problems.”

Data, Graphs, and Probability

In this unit, your student will collect, organize, display, analyze, and interpret real-world data. Your student will collect data in an organized way by using a tally chart. Once the data has been gathered, your student will display the data in pictographs and bar graphs in order to read and interpret the information. Your student will also read and use line graphs. While pictographs and bar graphs compare data, your student will determine that line graphs show how data changes over time. The next part of this unit focuses on probability. Your student will engage in experiments, list possible outcomes for an event, describe the likelihood of an event, and make predictions about an experiment. The line plot will be introduced as a way to display comparisons between data and as a tool to predict future results. The problem-solving strategy in this unit is “use tables and graphs to draw conclusions.”

Course Sets

  • Math (3)

Kit

  • Math 3-5 Kit

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Math 3 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Scott Foresman enVisionMATH 3

Supplies

  • Base-ten flats, green (1 set)
  • Base-ten rods, green (10)
  • Base-ten units, green (20 cubes)
  • Coins (44)
  • Counters, 2-color (20)
  • Dollar bills (40)
  • Game spinner, blank (1)
  • Number cubes, blank with 50 labels (2)
  • Tiles, color (20)
  • Tiles, fraction (51)

Workbook

  • SF enVisionMATH 3 Interactive Homework Workbook

Gifted and Talented Science 3 A

Description:
This course introduces science as an adventure in learning about the world around us. Through hands-on activities, student-designed experiments, research, and guided readings, students begin exploring the life and Earth sciences. In the Earth science unit, students learn about the Earth and its changing features. In life science, they explore the living world and its organisms. Designed to accommodate a variety of learning styles, the lessons encourage students to apply new concepts through activity-centered learning, reading, and traditional research and instruction methods. Students also explore the scientific method and various careers in science.

Units:

Be a Scientist

In this introductory unit, your student will learn about the scientific method through the actions of two scientists who are studying animals in Madagascar. Your student will learn how these scientists, Chris and Paule, use the scientific method to learn more about the world around them. He will read how the scientific method helps the scientists study animals like the Madagascan chameleon.

Your student will also be introduced to the many inquiry-based skills that he will use throughout this course. He will learn how to form a hypothesis, make observations, analyze data, draw conclusions, and communicate results. Before your student begins the next unit, he will learn about science safety and why it’s important for scientists to be safe and responsible when conducting research.

A Look at Living Things

In this unit, your student will explore what living things need to survive. She will learn how to identify living things and nonliving things in an ecosystem and will be introduced to the basic needs of all organisms, including food, water, air, and space.

During this unit, your student will conduct an inquiry-based experiment with plants, which will help her identify what factors influence a plant’s ability to survive. She will study plant parts, as well as animal parts, and will learn how to classify plants and animals based on their characteristics. Lesson 8 is a student-selected project. The student will be able to choose from three options relating to the unit. A rubric is included and will be used for scoring purposes.

Living Things Grow and Change

In this unit, your student will explore the life cycles of plants and animals. He will identify the different life stages of organisms. Your student will use the scientific method to develop and test a hypothesis related to plant growth.

During this unit, your student will explore the process of metamorphosis by studying amphibians and insects. He will learn how traits, such as hair and eye color, can be passed on from parents to offspring. Lesson 5 is a student-selected project. The student will be able to choose from three options relating to the unit. A rubric is included and will be used for scoring purposes. By the end of this unit, your student will have a better understanding of where some of his traits may have come from.

Living Things in Ecosystems

In this unit, your student will be introduced to ecosystems and the organisms that inhabit them. She will examine food chains and food webs, then identify roles that different organisms play within their ecosystem. She will learn how to use communication skills to share information about energy within an ecosystem. During this unit, your student will study different types of ecosystems, including deserts, tropical rain forests, temperate forests, oceans, and wetlands. She will learn how plants and animals have specific adaptations—structures or behaviors that help them survive in their environment. Lesson 7 is a student- selected project. The student will be able to choose from three options relating to the unit. A rubric is included and will be used for scoring purposes.

Changes in Ecosystems

In this unit, your student will examine how changes to the environment affect living things. He will learn how organisms compete for food, water, space, and other resources in their environment. Your student will also learn that pollution can have lasting effects on organisms and their habitats.

During this unit, your student will explore the ways in which people can protect the environment. He will learn how to help the environment by following the “Three Rs”: reduce, reuse, and recycle. Lesson 3 is a student-selected project. The student will be able to choose from three options relating to the unit. A rubric is included and will be used for scoring purposes. By the end of this unit, your student will understand how populations of organisms can be affected by drastic changes to the environment, such as fires and floods. He will learn how scientists study fossils to gain information about environmental changes that occurred in the past.

Earth Changes

In this unit, your student will explore Earth’s structure. She will learn to identify Earth’s oceans and continents as well as specific landforms, such as mountains, valleys, canyons, plains, and coasts. By studying an image in her textbook, your student will investigate unique features of the ocean floor. She will identify and define a continental shelf, an abyssal plain, and a seafloor trench.

Your student will also examine Earth’s layers: the crust, mantle, and core. She will read about earthquakes and how they can affect the physical structure of Earth’s crust. In addition, your student will read about volcanoes, landslides, and floods—and how they can alter the appearance of Earth’s surface. Finally, your student will discover how the processes of weathering and erosion change landscapes across the world. Lesson 5 is a student selected project. The student will be able to choose from three options relating to the unit. A rubric is included and will be used for scoring purposes.

Course Sets

  • GT Science (3)

Kit

  • Science 3 Kit

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Gifted and Talented Science 3 A and B Course Guide

Supplies

  • Dropper
  • Goggles, safety
  • Hand lens
  • Magnet, bar (set of 2)
  • Modeling clay
  • Thermometers (2)

Workbook

  • McGraw-Hill Science: Activity Lab Book 3
  • McGraw-Hill Science: Reading and Writing 3

Gifted and Talented Science 3 B

Description:
In this course, students explore the fascinating worlds of Earth and matter. In the Earth science unit, students study the earth’s composition in detail as well as the relationships between the Earth, moon, and sun. In the physical science unit, they study the properties of matter. Lessons are designed to engage the student’s natural curiosity, from building a model for investigating how simple machines work to studying why the moon’s shape appears to change throughout the month. The course accommodates a range of learning styles with activity-centered learning as well as readings, research, and traditional instruction. Students also explore the scientific method andvarious careers in science.

Units:

Using Earth’s Resources

In this unit, your student will explore Earth’s minerals. He will examine mineral properties such as color, streak, luster, and hardness. After studying minerals, your student will learn how minerals combine to form rocks. He will explore the three types of rocks: igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic.

In the second part of the unit, your student will learn how to use variables to answer a scientific question. He will do this by conducting an experiment with different types of soil. Your student will then read about fossils and how they form. He will explore Earth’s renewable and nonrenewable resources and will read about the ways people can conserve natural resources. Lesson 7 is a student-selected project. The student will be able to choose from three options relating to the unit. A rubric is included and will be used for scoring purposes.

Changes in Weather

In this unit, your student will explore weather. She will learn how different types of weather form in Earth’s atmosphere, and she will read about predicting weather. Your student will test her inquiry skills when she completes the lab “Interpret Data.” She will learn how to interpret weather data that was collected throughout a year.

Next your student will study the water cycle and how it relates to different weather patterns. She will read about evaporation, condensation, and precipitation; and she will examine a detailed diagram in her textbook that illustrates the water cycle. Finally, your student will discover the difference between weather and climate. She will learn how and why climates vary across the world. Lesson 5 is a student-selected project. The student will be able to choose from three options relating to the unit. A rubric is included and will be used for scoring purposes.

Planets, Moons, and Stars

In this unit, your student will investigate the solar system. He will first study the Earth-moon-sun relationship and will learn why there are seasons on Earth and why there are phases of the moon. Next your student will explore other planets in the solar system. He will compare and contrast the inner and outer planets. When reading about the outer planets, be sure that your student understands that Pluto is now considered a dwarf planet.

Lesson 6 is a student-selected project. The student will be able to choose from three options relating to the unit. A rubric is included and will be used for scoring purposes.

At the end of this unit, your student will explore stars. He will learn why stars can only be seen at night and why the Big Dipper is not a constellation. Your student will be able to explain why different stars can be viewed during different seasons. After completing the reading assignments for this unit, your student will have a better understanding of the many features of the solar system.

Observing Matter

In this unit, your student will begin to investigate matter. She will learn how to identify examples of matter and will study several properties of matter, including mass and volume. Your student will learn that matter is composed of elements. Practical examples of elements are pictured in your student’s textbook.

After learning what matter is, your student will explore the ways that matter can be measured. She will learn the standard units of measurement for length, volume, and mass. She will also learn how to differentiate between mass and weight. At the end of the unit, your student will explore the three states of matter—solids, liquids, and gases—and how she uses them every day. Lesson 4 is a student-selected project. The student will be able to choose from three options relating to the unit. A rubric is included and will be used for scoring purposes.

Changes in Matter

In this unit, your student will continue learning about matter. He will explore changes to matter’s state. Your student will learn what happens to matter when it freezes, melts, condenses, and evaporates. He will conduct an experiment to determine whether salt water freezes faster—or slower—than fresh water.

Your student will also learn how to differentiate between physical changes and chemical changes in matter. He will read how physical changes can be observed, but some chemical changes cannot. Your student will learn that the release of heat and/or gas generally indicates that a chemical change has occurred. Lesson 6 is a student-selected project. The student will be able to choose from three options relating to the unit. A rubric is included and will be used for scoring purposes.

Forces and Motion

In this unit, your student will study the relationship between forces and motion. She will learn how to define factors such as position, distance, and speed. She will also learn how forces change the motion of objects. Your student will learn about magnetic force, and will conduct an experiment to determine how magnetic force is affected by the distance between an object and a magnet.

Your student will go on to study work, energy, and simple machines. She will define kinetic and potential energy, and will be able to explain how energy can change from one form to another. She will explore the six simple machines: levers, pulleys, wheels and axles, inclined planes, screws, and wedges. Lesson 6 is a student-selected project. The student will be able to choose from three options relating to the unit. A rubric is included and will be used for scoring purposes. After your student has completed all of the reading assignments, see if she can identify a compound machine at home.

Forms of Energy

In this final unit, your student will explore the following forms of energy—heat, sound, light, and electricity. He will learn how to differentiate between heat and temperature and will learn about conductors and insulators in an experiment with three potential insulators. In this unit, your student will learn how sound travels and will learn the difference between volume and pitch. Your student will also explore properties of light and be able to define opaque, transparent, and translucent. He will learn how different colors are made and how light can be reflected and refracted. At the end of this unit, your student will study electricity. He will gain a basic understanding of static electricity and will explore how electric currents flow through circuits.

Course Sets

  • GT Science (3)

Kit

  • Science 3 Kit

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Gifted and Talented Science 3 A and B Course Guide

Supplies

  • Dropper
  • Goggles, safety
  • Hand lens
  • Magnet, bar (set of 2)
  • Modeling clay
  • Thermometers (2)

Workbook

  • McGraw-Hill Science: Activity Lab Book 3
  • McGraw-Hill Science: Reading and Writing 3

Science 3 A

Description:
Science provides a way for people to actively learn about the world around them. Throughout this course the student will continue to perform hands-on activities to explore organisms, investigate changes, and examine the solar system. The McGraw-Hill textbook, Science: A Closer Look, and the science kit are the primary resources for this course. The life science units describe and analyze components of the the living world. The Earth science unit describes Earth’s features and the changes it undergoes. The student will also explore different careers in science and the scientific method.

In this course, the student will design an experiment to discover what plants need to survive, make a model of a cave, and delve into many more exciting experiments. The lessons in this course are designed to accommodate a variety of learning styles and to provide a variety of opportunities for the entire family to participate in the student’s education. Some lessons, or groups of lessons, in each unit are activity-centered, which allows the student to engage the new concepts through exploration and discovery; others are more traditional, requiring the student to read, research, and reflect on the underlying theory.

Units:

Be a Scientist

In this introductory unit, your student will learn about the scientific method through the actions of two scientists who are studying animals in Madagascar. Your student will learn how these scientists, Chris and Paule, use the scientific method to learn more about the world around them. He will read how the scientific method helps them study animals like the Madagascan chameleon.

Your student will also be introduced to the many inquiry-based skills that he will use throughout this course. He will learn how to form a hypothesis, make observations, analyze data, draw conclusions, and communicate results. Before your student begins the next unit, he will learn about science safety and why it’s important for scientists to be safe and responsible when conducting research.

A Look at Living Things

In this unit, your student will explore what living things need to survive. She will learn how to identify living things and nonliving things in an ecosystem and will be introduced to the basic needs of all organisms, including food, water, air, and space.

During this unit, your student will conduct an inquiry-based experiment with plants, which will help her identify what factors influence a plant’s ability to survive. She will study plant parts, as well as animal parts, and will learn how to classify plants and animals based on their characteristics.

Living Things Grow and Change

In this unit, your student will explore the life cycles of plants and animals. He will identify the different life stages of organisms. Your student will use the scientific method to develop and test a hypothesis related to plant growth.

During this unit, your student will explore the process of metamorphosis by studying amphibians and insects. He will learn how traits, such as hair and eye color, can be passed on from parents to offspring. By the end of this unit, your student will have a better understanding of where some of her traits may have come from.

Living Things in Ecosystems

In this unit, your student will be introduced to ecosystems and the organisms that inhabit them. She will examine food chains and food webs, then identify roles that different organisms play within their ecosystem. She will learn how to use communication skills to share information about energy within an ecosystem. During this unit, your student will study different types of ecosystems, including deserts, tropical rain forests, temperate forests, oceans, and wetlands. She will learn how plants and animals have specific adaptations—structures or behaviors that help them survive in their environment.

Changes in Ecosystems

In this unit, your student will examine how changes to the environment affect living things. He will learn how organisms compete for food, water, space, and other resources in their environment. Your student will also learn that pollution can have lasting effects on organisms and their habitats.

During this unit, your student will explore the ways in which people can protect the environment. He will learn how to help the environment by following the “Three Rs”—reduce, reuse, and recycle. By the end of this unit, your student will understand how populations of organisms can be affected by drastic changes to the environment, such as fires and floods. He will learn how scientists study fossils to gain information about environmental changes that occurred in the past.

Earth Changes

In this unit, your student will explore Earth’s structure. She will learn to identify Earth’s oceans and continents as well as specific landforms, such as mountains, valleys, canyons, plains, and coasts. By studying an image in her textbook, your student will investigate unique features of the ocean floor. She will identify and define a continental shelf, an abyssal plain, and a seafloor trench.

Your student will also examine Earth’s layers: the crust, mantle, and core. She will read about earthquakes and how they can affect the physical structure of Earth’s crust. In addition, your student will read about volcanoes, landslides, and floods—and how they can alter the appearance of Earth’s surface. Finally, your student will discover how the processes of weathering and erosion change landscapes across the world.

Course Sets

  • Science (3)

Kit

  • Science 3 Kit

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Science 3 A and B Course Guide

Supplies

  • Dropper
  • Goggles, safety
  • Hand lens
  • Magnet, bar (set of 2)
  • Modeling clay
  • Thermometers (2)

Workbook

  • McGraw-Hill Science: Reading and Writing 3

Science 3 B

Description:
Science provides a way for people to actively learn about the world around them. Throughout this course the student will continue to perform hands-on activities to explore organisms, investigate changes, and examine the solar system. The McGraw-Hill textbook, Science: A Closer Look, and the science kit are the primary resources for this course. The Earth science units detail Earth’s composition and the relationships between the Earth, moon, and sun. The physical science unit explores the properties of matter. The student will also explore different careers in science and the scientific method.

In this course, the student will create a model to investigate how simple machines work, investigate why the moon’s shape appears to change during the month, and delve into many more exciting experiments. The lessons in this course are designed to accommodate a variety of learning styles and to provide a variety of opportunities for the entire family to participate in the student’s education. Some lessons, or groups of lessons, in each unit are activity-centered, which allows the student to engage the new concepts through exploration and discovery; others are more traditional, requiring the student to read, research, and reflect on the underlying theory.

Units:

Using Earth’s Resources

In this unit, your student will explore Earth’s minerals. He will examine mineral properties such as color, streak, luster, and hardness. After studying minerals, your student will learn how minerals combine to form rocks. He will explore the three types of rocks: igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic.

In the second part of the unit, your student will learn how to use variables to answer a scientific question. He will do this by conducting an experiment with different types of soil. Your student will then read about fossils and how they form. He will explore Earth’s renewable and nonrenewable resources and will read about the ways people can conserve natural resources.

Changes in Weather

In this unit, your student will explore weather. She will learn how different types of weather form in Earth’s atmosphere, and she will read about predicting weather. Your student will test her inquiry skills when she completes the lab, “Interpret Data.” She will learn how to interpret weather data that was collected throughout a year.

Next, your student will study the water cycle and how it relates to different weather patterns. She will read about evaporation, condensation, and precipitation; and she will examine a detailed diagram in her textbook that illustrates the water cycle. Finally, your student will discover the difference between weather and climate. She will learn how and why climates vary across the world.

Planets, Moons, and Stars

In this unit, your student will investigate the solar system. He will first study the Earth-moon-sun relationship and will learn why there are seasons on Earth and why there are phases of the moon. Next, your student will explore other planets in the solar system. He will compare and contrast the inner and outer planets. When reading about the outer planets, be sure that your student understands that Pluto is now considered a dwarf planet.

At the end of this unit, your student will explore stars. He will learn why stars can only be seen at night and why the Big Dipper is not a constellation. Your student will be able to explain why different stars can be viewed during different seasons. After completing the reading assignments for this unit, your student will have a better understanding of the many features of the solar system.

Observing Matter

In this unit, your student will begin to investigate matter. She will learn how to identify examples of matter and will study several properties of matter, including mass and volume. Your student will learn that matter is composed of elements. Practical examples of elements are pictured in your student’s textbook.

After learning what matter is, your student will explore the ways that matter can be measured. She will learn the standard units of measurement for length, volume, and mass. She will also learn how to differentiate between mass and weight. At the end of the unit, your student will explore the three states of matter—solids, liquids, and gases—and how she uses them every day.

Changes in Matter

In this unit, your student will continue learning about matter. He will explore changes to matter’s state. Your student will learn what happens to matter when it freezes, melts, condenses, and evaporates. He will conduct an experiment to determine whether salt water freezes faster—or slower—than fresh water.

Your student will also learn how to differentiate between physical changes and chemical changes in matter. He will read how physical changes can be observed, but some chemical changes cannot. Your student will learn that the release of heat and/or gas generally indicates that a chemical change has occurred.

Forces and Motion

In this unit, your student will study the relationship between forces and motion. She will learn how to define factors such as position, distance, and speed. She will also learn how forces change the motion of objects. Your student will learn about magnetic force, and will conduct an experiment to determine how magnetic force is affected by the distance between an object and a magnet.

Your student will go on to study work, energy, and simple machines. She will define kinetic and potential energy, and will be able to explain how energy can change from one form to another. She will explore the six simple machines: levers, pulleys, wheels and axles, inclined planes, screws, and wedges. After your student has completed all of the reading assignments, see if she can identify a compound machine at home.

Forms of Energy

In this final unit, your student will explore the following forms of energy—heat, sound, light, and electricity. He will learn how to differentiate between heat and temperature, and will learn about conductors and insulators in an experiment with three potential insulators. In this unit, your student will learn how sound travels and will learn the difference between volume and pitch.

Your student will also explore properties of light and be able to define opaque, transparent, and translucent. He will learn how different colors are made and how light can be reflected and refracted. At the end of this unit, your student will study electricity. He will gain a basic understanding of static electricity and will explore how electric currents flow through circuits.

Course Sets

  • Science (3)

Kit

  • Science 3 Kit

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Science 3 A and B Course Guide

Supplies

  • Dropper
  • Goggles, safety
  • Hand lens
  • Magnet, bar (set of 2)
  • Modeling clay
  • Thermometers (2)

Workbook

  • McGraw-Hill Science: Reading and Writing 3

Social Studies 3 A

Description:
This Social Studies course focuses on the theme of community through the study of geography, history, government, and economics. The course text is Scott Foresman’s Communities. In this course, the student will explore a variety of communities, past and present, from around the world. Short stories, biographies, poetry, case studies, songs, and other resources emphasize the role of the individual in the community, as well as the influence of geography on communities. Multimedia resources including Teachlet®tutorials, videos, and interactive websites enhance and support the content. The student will learn geographic concepts such as place, location, and human interaction with the environment. Geography skills lessons are incorporated throughout the course. In addition, the student will learn the basic principles that led to the creation of the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution. The student will learn about the rights and responsibilities of citizens and the three branches of government. In the economics unit, the student will examine basic economic concepts such as money, prices, supply and demand, and taxes. The student will examine factors that contribute to personal economic decisions.

Units:

Our Community

In this unit, your student will understand the meaning of community as a place where people live, work, and have fun. He will recognize the characteristics of rural, suburban, and urban communities. He will also be able to recognize each type of community. Your student will study pictures and stories of different communities in the United States and around the world.

People in Communities

In this unit, your student will learn about those factors that inspired people to travel to America from places around the world. She will understand the experiences immigrants faced as they strived to learn new customs and start new lives. She will also understand the importance of celebrating existing and past cultures of a community.

Where Are Communities?

In this unit, your student will understand how different physical environments distinguish one community from another community. He will learn how each community differs by its climate and the types of resources that are available in that area. Your student will also understand why some communities are able to develop and grow along mountains, water systems, roads, railroads, and air routes.

CD/DVD

  • SF Digital Learning CD-ROM: Communities

Course Sets

  • Social Studies (3)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Social Studies 3 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Scott Foresman Social Studies: Communities

Workbook

  • Scott Foresman Communities Quick Study

Social Studies 3 B

Description:
This Social Studies course focuses on the theme of community through the study of geography, history, government, and economics. The course text is Scott Foresman’s Communities. In this course, the student will explore a variety of communities, past and present, from around the world. Short stories, biographies, poetry, case studies, songs, and other resources emphasize the role of the individual in the community, as well as the influence of geography on communities. Multimedia resources including Teachlet®tutorials, videos, and interactive websites enhance and support the content. The student will learn geographic concepts such as place, location, and human interaction with the environment. Geography skills lessons are incorporated throughout the course. In addition, the student will learn the basic principles that led to the creation of the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution. The student will learn about the rights and responsibilities of citizens and the three branches of government. In the economics unit, the student will examine basic economic concepts such as money, prices, supply and demand, and taxes. The student will examine factors that contribute to personal economic decisions.

Units:

History of Communities

In this unit, your student will learn how the history of present-day communities throughout North America was shaped by the migration and exploration of early groups. She will learn about early day Spanish, French, English and Native American settlements. She will also understand how technology changes a community over time through innovations in transportation, communication, and medicine, along with key inventions.

Communities at Work

In this unit, your student will understand how money impacts consumers’ choices and decision making regarding their earnings, spending and savings. He will learn how people’s actions are influenced by the ability to distinguish needs from wants. He will also learn how business owners are confronted with decisions and choices regarding production, services, and resources which impact profits.

Governments

In this unit, your student will learn about past government and the impact that present day government has on the rights and responsibilities of today’s citizens. She will learn how citizens can become good citizens by using these rights and responsibilities on a community, state and country level. She will also learn about the structure of state government and understand how communities benefit from local government services and community leaders.

CD/DVD

  • SF Digital Learning CD-ROM: Communities

Course Sets

  • Social Studies (3)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Social Studies 3 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Scott Foresman Social Studies: Communities

Workbook

  • Scott Foresman Communities Quick Study

Educational Technology and Online Learning 3

Description:
Word processing and Web use are the main subjects for the third grade course Educational Technology and Online Learning. Students learn how to create, edit, and add images to a word-processing document. They also learn and use Internet safety skills to find safe sources on the Internet to research various curriculum areas. Students follow parent and school rules about email usage to send and receive messages.

Units:

Introduction

Educational Technology and Online Learning course is designed to introduce new computer skills and computer terminology as well as reinforce academic content. Throughout this course, the student and Learning Coach will engage in lessons which incorporate activities that address both academic and technology objectives.

In this unit, your student will watch tutorials will familiarize them with the Technology Literacy course.

Internet Safety

In this unit, your student will learn about Internet safety. The goal of the lessons in this unit is to educate your student on how to avoid dangerous, inappropriate, or unlawful online behavior. Your student will become aware of the dangers associated with the Internet by reading stories and scenarios, learning safety tips, and completing related activities.National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS-S) Performance Indicators:

All students should have opportunities to demonstrate the following performances. Prior to completion of Grade 5, students will:1. Use keyboards and other common input and output devices (including adaptive devices when necessary) efficiently and effectively.
2. Discuss common uses of technology in daily life and the advantages and disadvantages those uses provide.
3. Discuss basic issues related to responsible use of technology and information and describe personal consequences of inappropriate use.
6. Use telecommunications efficiently and effectively to access remote information, communicate with others in support of direct and independent learning, and pursue personal interests.

NETS-S were developed by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE).

Keyboarding

The student will identify the home row and the rows above and below the home row. The student will review the keyboarding skills learned in Lessons 6–10 of the Touch Typing Program. The student will demonstrate correct posture and finger position while typing and apply proper touch typing skills to type the letters c, w, o, x, q, p, and z, the comma key, period key, and the forward slash key. Finally, the student will complete a typing speed test.

Study Skills

The Study Skills unit will introduce your student to basic study skills. The lessons in this unit include listening skills, organizational skills, and other skills to help your student become a successful learner. Your student will learn how to set realistic goals and will have the opportunity to create her own goals for this course. The important skills taught in this unit apply not only to Educational Technology and Online Learning but to all academic areas, as well as to the real world.

Microsoft® Paint

In this unit, your student will learn the basic tools of Microsoft® Paint. Your student will learn how to use the rectangle tool and fill bucket, in addition to learning how to add a variety of colors to the shapes using the paintbrush tool. He will also be able to draw a picture using each of the functional words in the featured lessons.

Microsoft® Word

In this unit, your student will learn basic Microsoft® Word techniques including how to insert and format tables, copy and paste sentences, use the spelling and grammar tool, insert and resize pictures, understand how and when to use certain fonts, and type descriptive paragraphs.

Microsoft® Excel

In this unit, your student will create formulas, adjust column width, and enter text into a Microsoft® Excel spreadsheet. Your student will also create borders, resize fonts, and format cells. He will also learn how to align text and fill cells with different colors, in addition to being able to calculate perimeter and area. Finally, your student will learn how to use Microsoft Excel to carry out mathematical processes.

Microsoft® PowerPoint

In this unit, your student will explore and be introduced to a variety of features in Microsoft® PowerPoint. She will learn how to make a presentation with slide layouts, create bulleted lists, copy and paste slides, how to resize and paste images into slides, and how to change the font and background within a presentation. She will also learn how to insert WordArt and modify color and size within this feature. Your student will also learn how to use a design template and learn how to create and type in text boxes to describe pictures on a slide.

Elective Courses

Elementary Chinese I

Description:
Chinese I is an introductory-level course that will introduce the student to Mandarin Chinese. In this course, the student will learn listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a variety of activities, including LiveLesson® sessions with a native Mandarin speaker! The units are designed to introduce the student to Chinese language and culture through familiar topics such as my family, my week, and food. Culture is presented throughout the course to help the student make connections between his culture and the culture of people in the Mandarin-speaking world.

Units:

My World

In this unit, you will begin to study Mandarin, the official language of China and many other countries. Millions of people around the world speak Mandarin. This unit will teach you about Mandarin’s importance in the world. You will also learn Mandarin words that describe your family. By the end of the unit, you will know how to introduce yourself and your family to others.

My Time

How is your life different from the life of a student who speaks Mandarin? In this unit, you will learn how students spend their time in countries where Mandarin is spoken. You will look for ways their activities are alike and different from yours. This unit will also introduce you to the Mandarin words that describe your everyday activities and time at school.

My Food

All cultures have different traditional foods, these are foods that are eaten for special occasions or have been eaten since a long time ago. Just like you have your own food traditions, other cultures have their own food traditions, too. In this unit, you will learn about food customs in Mandarin-speaking countries. You will also learn words that describe food in Mandarin.

Elementary Chinese II

Description:
In this course, the student will further develop communication skills as he listens, speaks, reads, and writes Mandarin Chinese at a more advanced level. The student will continue to learn about Chinese culture by exploring historic places in China and other Mandarin-speaking countries, and by learning about holidays and special traditions celebrated there. In addition, the student will practice Mandarin Chinese skills by continuing to converse with a native Mandarin speaker.

Units:

My Travels

In this unit, you will take a trip through historical places in China and other Mandarin-speaking countries. During this experience, you will learn to describe people, yourself, places, and types of transportation.

My Holidays

What holidays do you celebrate? The people in the Mandarin-speaking world may celebrate some of your favorite holidays. They also have their own special holidays, too. In this unit, you will learn about the important holidays celebrated in China and other Mandarin-speaking countries. You will learn about why the holiday is celebrated, its history, and its importance to students your age in the Mandarin-speaking world. You will compare what you learn about the Mandarin-speaking world with your own country.

My Home

What are homes like in the Mandarin-speaking world? How are they different from homes in the United States? In this unit, you will learn about a typical home in some Mandarin-speaking countries, including the uses for different rooms of the home. You will find out how the activities that happen in the rooms are alike and different from yours. In this unit, you will also learn the names of some objects that can be found in a home, like furniture, clothes, flowers, and pets.

Elementary Sign Language

Description:
In this course, students are introduced to the fundamental concepts of American Sign Language. Students explore vocabulary, grammar, and conversational skills using basic signing and fingerspelling techniques.

Units:

Intro

In this unit, your student will be introduced to American Sign Language, or ASL. He will study the history of ASL and learn how it became the standard language for deaf and hard of hearing people in North America. He will also learn about some of the accepted rules of etiquette in Deaf culture. This introductory unit also teaches your student how to sign the letters of the alphabet and the mechanics of fingerspelling.

Numbers

This unit introduces the signing of numbers. Your student will learn how to sign numbers 1–100, as well as the signs for dollars and cents. A variety of fun activities give your student a chance to practice using ASL to discuss counting and using money.

Time

In this unit, your student will study various aspects of time. Not only will he learn how to communicate time using ASL, he will also learn the signs for the 7 days of the week and the 12 months of the year. The signs for various holidays as well as the four seasons are also taught in this unit.

Nouns

Your student will learn the signs for some commonly used nouns. The categories of family, places, food, colors, and animals are explored as your student practices these signs to add to her growing library of American Sign Language knowledge.

Descriptions

The lessons in this unit will teach your student how to sign various descriptions using American Sign Language. He will learn how to sign descriptive words that express feelings, sizes, possessions, and locations. In addition, he will combine some previously taught signs for numbers, time, and nouns, with descriptive signs taught in this unit.

Elementary Spanish I

Description:
Elementary Spanish I is an introductory-level course that will introduce the student to Spanish. In this course, the student will learn listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a variety of activities, including LiveLesson® sessions with a native Spanish speaker! The units are designed to introduce the student to Spanish language and culture through familiar topics such as my family, my week, and food. Culture is presented throughout the course to help the student make connections between his culture and the culture of people in the Spanish-speaking world.

Elementary Spanish II

Description:
Children’s Spanish II employs a unique approach to building Spanish fluency quickly and effortlessly. The stories are first introduced in English and then retold a number of times with progressively more Spanish. Although the course focuses on the oral aspect of the language, there is more exposure to reading and writing than in the previous level. Fascinating information on Hispanic culture is gracefully interwoven into the captivating adventure stories.

Music III

Description:
The Music courses, with content developed by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, focus on teaching basic music concepts through traditional children’s songs and classical music examples. Students develop fine and gross motor skills that will enable them to keep a steady beat and learn rhythm instruments. Music III extends the student’s music reading skills.

Units:

The Basics: Beat, Rhythm, and Melody

In this unit your student will learn basic music concepts of beat, rhythm, melody, and pitch. Traditional children’s songs will be used to teach and reinforce these concepts. Your student will be encouraged to move to music in different ways to keep the steady heartbeat and learn basic rhythmic patterns. Listening activities and voice play will be used to help your student use a singing voice and learn basic melodic patterns.

Beat, Rhythm, and Meter

In this unit your student will further explore rhythmic concepts. She will keep a steady heartbeat though movement and by playing a drum. She will learn and read new rhythmic patterns. Then, investigate the difference between the steady heartbeat and a rhythm pattern. Your student will also discover meter, or how beats are grouped.

Melodic Patterns

In this unit traditional children’s songs will be used to teach melodic patterns. Your student will be introduced to the music staff and other music symbols. Your students will also begin to learn about harmony, singing partner songs, and in canon.

The Orchestra

In this unit, your student will examine the sections of the orchestra. She will listen to a variety of musical examples, including symphonies, concertos, solo pieces, and chamber music. The student will take a closer look at the string and woodwind sections; examining how sounds are produced, how instruments in one group are similar, and look at a small ensemble from each family. Finally, she will investigate the life of one of the most important composers, Ludwig van Beethoven.

More With Rhythm and Meter

In this unit your student will further develop his music reading skills. Using known rhythm values, he will discover new and more complex rhythmic patterns. Meter will be further explored. He will perform ostinatos with songs. Finally, he will compose and perform an ostinato.

More Melodic Patterns

In this unit your student will further explore melodic patterns and pitch relationships. Through singing and listening examples she will investigate music based on both the Do-pentatonic scale and the La-pentatonic scale. She will also sing in parts by singing in canon and a melodic ostinato.

Home Life

Description:
Here, students select from a number of projects that develop skills through fun, experiential learning projects. Activities include cooking, crafts, sewing, home maintenance, family outings, and genealogy. Recently added projects include Lemonade Stand and Backyard Ecosystems.

Units:

In the Kitchen

In the Garage

In the Store

In the Garden

In the Family

WebQuest

Description:
Students help scientists monitor frog and toad populations across the country using FrogWatch USA™. Managed by the Association of Zoos & Aquariums, FrogWatch USA uses data collected by students to develop new ways to protect amphibians, which are extremely sensitive to ecological changes. Students visit a local wetland site once a week, make careful observations, and submit their data online. This online project joins Connections Academy students and scientists around the country as they gather and analyze data.

2 thoughts on “GRADE 3: K to 12 Curriculum Guide – National Connections Academy

  1. Pingback: Where K to 10 is BETTER than K to 12 | Multilingual Philippines

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