GRADE 5: K to 12 Curriculum Guide – National Connections Academy

National Connections Academy’s (NaCA) full course listing below is a comprehensive look at every course available for the Grade 5 level. The push to get into the K to 12 basic education program was, to be charitable about it, in part because of the proponents’ desire to upgrade our basic education program to improve the quality/skills of our student output/graduates and in part to keep up with the Joneses. Well, the following is posted here to show us what the Joneses are doing. 

WARNING!!!!!  THE FOLLOWING GRADE 5 COURSE GUIDE BY NATIONAL CONNECTIONS ACADEMY – WHICH IS NOT SANCTIONED BY DEPED — IS BEING POSTED HERE FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY:

Grade 5 Core Courses

Physical Education 5

Description:
Students participate in a variety of activities that are designed to enhance personal fitness. Students choose from a variety of fitness plans including yoga, participating in an individual or team sport, or Connections Academy’s fitness plan. Students track their participation and progress through the Activity Tracker.

Units:

The Presidential Fitness Challenge: Introduction

In this unit, your student will learn about The Presidential Fitness Challenge. The President’s Challenge is a program created by the United States government that rewards students for being physically active and physically fit. Your student will learn about the events involved, the awards that he can win, and how to keep track of his progress. By the end of this unit, your student will have taken his first step toward earning the Presidential Physical Fitness Award or the Presidential Active Lifestyle Award.

Learning Locomotor Skills

In this unit, your student will demonstrate age-appropriate proficiency in fundamental sports skills: throwing, catching, kicking, running, and jumping.

Your student will learn the eight principal locomotor skills: running, hopping, vertical jumping, horizontal jumping, galloping, sliding, skipping, and leaping. Some of these locomotor skills relate directly to sports skills, while others will assist your student with dance skills and in becoming a more skillful mover. Your student will also begin to participate in daily exercise activities.

Developing a Healthy Exercise Routine

In this unit, your student will learn the four principles of exercise: regularity, overload, specificity, and progression. He will also learn about the four components—warm-up, stretching, exercise, and cool-down—that make up an effective exercise routine. Lastly, he will gain an understanding of why each one is important and then begin the suggested daily exercise activities.

Your Body and Exercise

In this unit, your student will learn about how different factors affect her body during exercise. The unit explores body type and composition, proper diet and nutrition, the importance of fluids during exercise, how the human body maintains a healthy balance, and how exercise-related injuries can be prevented and cared for.

The Presidential Fitness Challenge

In this unit, your student will participate in The Presidential Physical Fitness Challenge. The President’s Challenge is a program created by the United States government that rewards students for being physically active and physically fit. Your student will complete various exercises and submit a record of his performance in these exercises to his teacher for verification and recognition.

Games Around The World

In this unit, your student will learn about games played by children in other countries. She will learn games from countries in Asia in the first lesson. Next she will look at games that are played in countries in Europe. The third lesson will concentrate on games that children play in Australia. Finally, in the fourth lesson your student will focus on games from countries in Africa.

CD/DVD

  • Elementary Yoga DVD (set of 2)

Course Sets

  • Physical Education (3, 4, 5)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Get Fit Handbook

Supplies

  • Jump rope

Art 5

Description:
Art elements, principles, and criticism are introduced, and students study the arts across time. Your child will also use various media to create two- and three-dimensional projects.

Units:

The Ancient World

This unit will acquaint your student with some of the artwork from pre-history and ancient civilizations while exploring the elements of art. Your student will apply the elements of line, shape, color, texture, form, value, and space to his own artworks as he analyzes these elements in the works of ancient artists.

The Middle Ages to the Renaissance

Your student traveled through ancient cultures in Unit 1, and she will now explore the artworks and cultures of the Middle Ages through the Renaissance in Unit 2. As she explores this art, she will come to understand the principles of art and how they were and are applied to artworks. Your student will have the opportunity to create her own artworks by applying the elements, principles, and techniques of visual art.

Baroque/Rococo

This unit will present Baroque and Rococo styles of European art and architecture. Students will have an opportunity to observe images of various world-renowned structures to gain an understanding of the design elements of Baroque and Rococo structures. Students will also have an opportunity to explore the elements of Rococo style in visual artwork and music. In addition, students will demonstrate an understanding of Baroque and Rococo artists use of color by making a collage that uses color to create a mood.

Romanticism and the Modern Age

The Romantic movement produced art that has emotional and spiritual themes.  Much of the art created in the period that followed the Romantic era, the Modern age, is experimental. In this unit your student will learn about the art and artists of both of these periods. She will examine Romantic landscape paintings and have the opportunity to create her own landscape painting. She will study the works of John Constable, Vincent Van Gogh, and Pablo Picasso. In addition, she will learn more about the role of an artist in society.

Course Sets

  • Art (3, 4, 5)

Kit

  • Art 3-5 Kit

Supplies

  • Drawing pad
  • Paintbrushes (set of 5)

Gifted and Talented Language Arts 5 A

Description:
Connections Academy’s Gifted and Talented Language Arts 5 course provides students opportunities to work at an accelerated pace, while engaging in more complex and challenging instructional activities. Students are provided opportunities for increased student-teacher discussion, as well as increased interaction with their peers. Critical thinking skills are intertwined with novel activities in order to sharpen students’ analytical abilities. Reading comprehension instruction allowing students to practice identifying main ideas and themes in any given reading passage. The writing content throughout the course concentrates on crafting quality sentences, organizing paragraphs, summary writing, and adding detail to writing.

Units:

Meeting Challenges

In this unit, your student will explore the theme of meeting challenges while learning essential reading and writing skills. The reading selections encompass several genres, including humorous fiction and tall tales, historical fiction, biography, and expository nonfiction. Additionally, your student will explore the unit theme by reading Childtimes, a family memoir spanning three generations. Your student will learn and practice reading comprehension skills, such as understanding plot, characterization, setting, and theme; understanding sequence; and understanding causes and effects. Reading instruction also addresses fluency skills, such as reading with correct phrasing and tone, and vocabulary development strategies, such as understanding word structure, using context clues, and referring to a dictionary. Additionally, your student will learn the steps of the writing process and apply them in weekly writing assignments, which culminate in a personal narrative submitted as the first assessment for his writing portfolio. Writing models, graphic organizers, and checklists for drafting and revising are provided as support. Finally, your student will receive weekly spelling instruction, which focuses on understanding letter patterns and word structure, as well as grammar instruction in using complete sentences and understanding different sentence types.

Doing the Right Thing

In this unit, your student will explore the theme of doing what is right, while building on the reading and writing skills introduced in Unit 1. This unit provides thorough instruction in reading comprehension skills, such as comparing and contrasting, understanding the author’s purpose, understanding causes and effects, and distinguishing between facts and opinions. The fluency and vocabulary development strategies taught in Unit 1 are reinforced throughout the unit. Your student will further develop her writing skills by composing in a variety of forms, including a summary and a news story submitted as part of her portfolio. Spelling instruction addresses word patterns and endings, including irregular plurals and words with r-controlled vowels. Grammar instruction develops your student’s understanding of nouns and verbs by addressing topics such as regular and irregular plural nouns, action and linking verbs, and subject-verb agreement.

Inventors and Artists

In this unit, your student will explore the theme of how inventors and artists have made an impact on the world. He will read a variety of selections, focusing primarily on biography and other expository nonfiction selections. Reading instruction will help your student to understand main ideas and details, identify facts and opinions, and use graphic sources of information. Throughout the unit, your student will continue to practice fluency skills, as well as vocabulary development strategies such as understanding word roots, context clues, and word structure. He will gain additional confidence as a writer as he learns to compose longer works, including a skit and a comparison/contrast essay submitted as part of the writing portfolio. Spelling instruction addresses a variety of topics. Grammar instruction focuses on verb forms and prepositions.

Course Sets

  • GT Language Arts (5)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Gifted Language Arts 5 A and B Course Guide

Novel

  • A Wrinkle in Time
  • Childtimes
  • Immigrant Kids

Online Text/eBook

  • Partial iText Scott Foresman Reading Street 5

Textbook

  • Scott Foresman Reading Street 5

Workbook

  • Scott Foresman Practice Book 5
  • Scott Foresman The Grammar & Writing Book 5
  • SF Word Study and Spelling Practice Book 5

Gifted and Talented Language Arts 5 B

Description:
Connections Academy’s Gifted and Talented Language Arts 5 course provides students opportunities to work at an accelerated pace, while engaging in more complex and challenging instructional activities. Students are provided opportunities for increased student-teacher discussion, as well as increased interaction with their peers. Critical thinking skills are intertwined with novel activities in order to sharpen students’ analytical abilities. Reading comprehension instruction allowing students to practice identifying main ideas and themes in any given reading passage. The writing content throughout the course concentrates on crafting quality sentences, organizing paragraphs, summary writing, and adding detail to writing.

Units:

Adapting

In this unit, your student will explore the theme of how people and animals adapt to new and challenging situations. She will read a variety of selections including prose, drama, and nonfiction selections. Reading instruction will help your student draw conclusions, generalize, and use graphic sources of information. Throughout the unit, your student will continue to practice fluency skills, as well as vocabulary development strategies such as understanding word roots, context clues, and word structure. She will gain additional confidence as a writer as she learns to compose longer works, including an e-mail, journal entry, narrative story, play, and descriptive piece. Spelling instruction addresses a variety of topics. Grammar instruction focuses on pronouns and antecedents.

Adventurers

In this unit, your student will explore the theme of how people seek and experience adventures. She will read a variety of selections including humorous and science fiction, narrative and expository nonfiction as well as an interview. Reading instruction will help your student use graphic sources, recognize character, plot, author’s purpose as well as cause and effect. Throughout the unit, your student will continue to practice fluency skills, as well as vocabulary development strategies such as using a dictionary or glossary, context clues, and word structure. She will gain additional confidence as a writer as she learns to compose longer works, including an editorial, biographical sketch, and advertisement. Spelling instruction addresses a variety of topics. Grammar instruction includes contractions, negatives, adverbs, and adjectives.

The Unexpected

In this unit, your student will read various selections that focus on the theme of what we can learn from encounters with the unexpected. He will also continue to build on the reading skills introduced in earlier units, such as drawing conclusions, finding the main idea, understanding comparing and contrasting, distinguishing between fact and opinion, and understanding sequence. This unit contains a wide range of reading selections, from expository nonfiction to myth. In addition, your student will read, A Wrinkle in Time, a science fiction novel by Madeleine L’Engle, which describes the adventures of three children through space and time. Fluency and vocabulary development strategies taught in previous units are reinforced throughout the unit. Writing instruction in this unit will develop your student’s ability to understand and create informational texts. In addition to learning how to take notes and create an outline, your student will write a humorous poem and an informational article submitted as part of his writing portfolio. Spelling instruction focuses on suffixes and final syllables as well as compound words and words that include ei and ie. Grammar instruction develops your student’s understanding of writing conventions, including conventions for modifiers, conjunctions, commas, quotations and quotations marks, and punctuation.

Course Sets

  • GT Language Arts (5)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Gifted Language Arts 5 A and B Course Guide

Novel

  • A Wrinkle in Time
  • Childtimes
  • Immigrant Kids

Online Text/eBook

  • Partial iText Scott Foresman Reading Street 5

Textbook

  • Scott Foresman Reading Street 5

Workbook

  • Scott Foresman Practice Book 5
  • Scott Foresman The Grammar & Writing Book 5
  • SF Word Study and Spelling Practice Book 5

Gifted and Talented Literature Study 5

Description:
The Junior Great Books® program employs the method of interpretive readings and discussion being known as the Shared Inquiry™ method. This distinctive approach to learning enables leaders—the teachers and Learning Coaches—to foster a vibrant environment in which a student acquires the habits and strategies of a self-reliant thinker, reader, and learner. Through their own curiosity and attentive questioning, leaders serve as partners in inquiry with the student, helping him work with other students to discover meaning in a reading selection and to build interpretations. The process reaches its fullest expression in Shared Inquiry discussion, where leaders and students think and talk about an interpretive question that arises from a particular story. Using LiveLesson® sessions, the student will interact with peers twice during each unit for Shared Inquiry and presentation of personal writing. Junior Great Books includes outstanding works of literature by award-winning authors. Praised for their rich language and international range, and chosen carefully for their ability to support multiple interpretations, the stories in Junior Great Books capture students’ attention and imagination and engage the best of their thinking. Progressing in reading level, conceptual complexity, and length throughout the series, the stories are the foundation for a thoughtful process of reading, discussion, and writing.

Units:

The No-Guitar Blues

In this unit, your student will read “The No-Guitar Blues.” Your student will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate places where he has a question. At the end of the first lesson, your student will share his questions in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, your student will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. At the end of the unit, your student will share his writing with his teacher and the other students during another LiveLesson session.

Kaddo’s Wall

In this unit, your student will read “Kaddo’s Wall,” a West African folktale. Your student will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate where she has a question. She will also practice her critical thinking skills by marking passages to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, your student will share her questions in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, your student will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. At the end of the unit, your student will share her writing with her teacher and the other students during another LiveLesson session.

Turquoise Horse

In this unit, your student will read “Turquoise Horse.” Your student will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate places where he has a question. He will also practice his critical thinking skills by marking passages to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, your student will share his questions in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, your student will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. At the end of the unit, your student will share his writing with his teacher and the other students during another LiveLesson session.

A Game of Catch

In this unit, your student will read “A Game of Catch.” Your student will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate where she has a question. She will also practice her critical thinking skills by marking passages to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, your student will share her questions in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, your student will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. At the end of the unit, your student will share her writing with her teacher and the other students during another LiveLesson session.

Oliver Hyde’s Dishcloth Concert

In this unit, your student will read “Oliver Hyde’s Dishcloth Concert.” Your student will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate places where he has a question. He will also practice his critical thinking skills by marking passages to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, your student will share his questions in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, your student will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. At the end of the unit, your student will share his writing with his teacher and the other students during another LiveLesson session.

The Hundred-Dollar Bill

In this unit, your student will read “The Hundred-Dollar Bill.” Your student will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate where she has a question. She will also practice her critical thinking skills by marking passages to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, your student will share her questions in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, your student will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. At the end of the unit, your student will share her writing with her teacher and the other students during another LiveLesson session.

The Invisible Child

In this unit, your student will read “The Invisible Child.” Your student will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate places where he has a question. He will also practice his critical thinking skills by marking passages to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, your student will share his questions in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, your student will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. At the end of the unit, your student will share his writing with his teacher and the other students during another LiveLesson session.

In the Time of the Drums

In this unit, your student will read “In the Time of the Drums,” a Gullah folktale. Your student will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate where she has a question. She will also practice her critical thinking skills by marking passages to indicate magical events in the story. At the end of the first lesson, your student will share her questions in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, your student will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. At the end of the unit, your student will share her writing with her teacher and the other students during another LiveLesson session.

Learning the Game

In this unit, your student will read “Learning the Game.” Your student will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate places where he has a question. He will also practice his critical thinking skills by marking passages to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, your student will share his questions in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, your student will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. At the end of the unit, your student will share his writing with his teacher and the other students during another LiveLesson session.

The Bat-Poet

In this unit, your student will read “The Bat-Poet.” Your student will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate where she has a question. She will also practice her critical thinking skills by marking passages to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, your student will share her questions in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, your student will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. At the end of the unit, your student will share her writing with her teacher and the other students during another LiveLesson session.

Course Sets

  • GT Literature Study 5

Textbook

  • JGB Series 5 Anthology Book One

Workbook

  • JGB Series 5 Reader’s Journal Book One

Language Arts 5 A

Description:
Students continue to develop their reading skills as they are introduced to novels and poetry. Critical thinking skills are intertwined with activities using novels in order to sharpen students’ analytical abilities. Reading comprehension instruction allows students to practice identifying main ideas and themes in any given reading passage. Students continue to develop their writing skills by focusing on structure, format, and grammar, with a concentration on crafting quality sentences, organizing paragraphs, writing summaries, and adding detail to writing. Grammar is included in this course to provide year-long exposure to the parts of speech and their functions.

Units:

Meeting Challenges

In this unit, your student will explore the theme of meeting challenges while learning essential reading and writing skills. The reading selections encompass several genres, including humorous fiction and tall tales, historical fiction, biography, and expository nonfiction. Additionally, your student will explore the unit theme by reading Childtimes, a family memoir spanning three generations. Your student will learn and practice reading comprehension skills, such as understanding plot, characterization, setting, and theme; understanding sequence; and understanding causes and effects. Reading instruction also addresses fluency skills, such as reading with correct phrasing and tone, and vocabulary development strategies, such as understanding word structure, using context clues, and referring to a dictionary. Additionally, your student will learn the steps of the writing process and apply them in weekly writing assignments, which culminate in a personal narrative submitted as the first assessment for his writing portfolio. Writing models, graphic organizers, and checklists for drafting and revising are provided as support. Finally, your student will receive weekly spelling instruction, which focuses on understanding letter patterns and word structure, as well as grammar instruction in using complete sentences and understanding different sentence types.

Doing the Right Thing

In this unit, your student will explore the theme of doing what is right, while building on the reading and writing skills introduced in Unit 1. This unit provides thorough instruction in reading comprehension skills, such as comparing and contrasting, understanding the author’s purpose, understanding causes and effects, and distinguishing between facts and opinions. The fluency and vocabulary development strategies taught in Unit 1 are reinforced throughout the unit. Your student will further develop her writing skills by composing in a variety of forms, including a summary and a news story submitted as part of her portfolio. Spelling instruction addresses word patterns and endings, including irregular plurals and words with r-controlled vowels. Grammar instruction develops your student’s understanding of nouns and verbs by addressing topics such as regular and irregular plural nouns, action and linking verbs, and subject-verb agreement.

Inventors and Artists

In this unit, your student will explore the theme of how inventors and artists have made an impact on the world. He will read a variety of selections, focusing primarily on biography and other expository nonfiction selections. Reading instruction will help your student to understand main ideas and details, identify facts and opinions, and use graphic sources of information. Throughout the unit, your student will continue to practice fluency skills, as well as vocabulary development strategies such as understanding word roots, context clues, and word structure. He will gain additional confidence as a writer as he learns to compose longer works, including a skit and a comparison/contrast essay submitted as part of the writing portfolio. Spelling instruction addresses a variety of topics. Grammar instruction focuses on verb forms and prepositions.

Course Sets

  • Language Arts (5)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Language Arts 5 A and B Course Guide

Novel

  • Childtimes
  • Harriet the Spy
  • The Search for Poison-Dart Frogs

Online Text/eBook

  • Partial iText Scott Foresman Reading Street 5

Textbook

  • Scott Foresman Reading Street 5

Workbook

  • Scott Foresman Practice Book 5
  • Scott Foresman The Grammar & Writing Book 5
  • SF Word Study and Spelling Practice Book 5

Language Arts 5 B

Description:
Students continue to develop their reading skills as they are introduced to novels and poetry. Critical thinking skills are intertwined with activities using novels in order to sharpen students’ analytical abilities. Reading comprehension instruction allows students to practice identifying main ideas and themes in any given reading passage. Students continue to develop their writing skills by focusing on structure, format, and grammar, with a concentration on crafting quality sentences, organizing paragraphs, writing summaries, and adding detail to writing. Grammar is included in this course to provide year-long exposure to the parts of speech and their functions.

Units:

Adapting

In this unit, your student will explore the theme of how people and animals adapt to new and challenging situations. She will read a variety of selections including prose, drama, and nonfiction selections. Reading instruction will help your student draw conclusions, generalize, and use graphic sources of information. Throughout the unit, your student will continue to practice fluency skills, as well as vocabulary development strategies such as understanding word roots, context clues, and word structure. She will gain additional confidence as a writer as she learns to compose longer works, including an e-mail, journal entry, narrative story, play, and descriptive piece. Spelling instruction addresses a variety of topics. Grammar instruction focuses on pronouns and antecedents.

Adventurers

In this unit, your student will explore the theme of how people seek and experience adventures. She will read a variety of selections including humorous and science fiction, narrative and expository nonfiction, as well as an interview. Reading instruction will help your student use graphic sources, recognize character, plot, and author’s purpose as well as cause and effect. Throughout the unit, your student will continue to practice fluency skills, as well as vocabulary development strategies, such as using a dictionary or glossary, context clues, and word structure. She will gain additional confidence as a writer as she learns to compose longer works, including an editorial, biographical sketch, and advertisement. Spelling instruction addresses a variety of topics. Grammar instruction includes contractions, negatives, adverbs, and adjectives.

The Unexpected

In this unit, your student will read various selections that explore the theme of what we can learn from encounters with the unexpected. The unit includes a wide range of reading selections, from expository nonfiction to myth, and concludes with Louise Fitzhugh’s classic novel Harriet the Spy. Reading instruction in the first half of this unit builds on the reading skills introduced in earlier units, such as comparing and contrasting, distinguishing between fact and opinion, and understanding sequence. Fluency and vocabulary development strategies taught in previous units are reinforced throughout the unit.

In the second half of this unit, your student will read Louise Fitzhugh’s novel Harriet the Spy. The novel tells the story of a young girl named Harriet M. Welsch, who considers herself a spy and takes her “job” very seriously. Harriet is a sharp observer of her friends, family members, and neighbors, and spends much of her time taking detailed notes about their habits and personality quirks. When Harriet’s classmates find and read her notebook, she faces harsh consequences and must struggle to repair the friendships that she holds dear. As your student follows Harriet’s intriguing story, he will identify literary elements, analyze characters, and use comprehension strategies to make connections and draw conclusions.Writing instruction in this unit will develop your student’s ability to understand and create informational texts. In addition to learning how to take notes and create an outline, your student will write a humorous poem and an informational article submitted as part of his writing portfolio. Spelling instruction focuses on compound words, words with ei and ie, and easily confused words. Grammar instruction develops your student’s understanding of writing conventions for punctuation, including commas and quotation marks.

Course Sets

  • Language Arts (5)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Language Arts 5 A and B Course Guide

Novel

  • Childtimes
  • Harriet the Spy
  • The Search for Poison-Dart Frogs

Online Text/eBook

  • Partial iText Scott Foresman Reading Street 5

Textbook

  • Scott Foresman Reading Street 5

Workbook

  • Scott Foresman Practice Book 5
  • Scott Foresman The Grammar & Writing Book 5
  • SF Word Study and Spelling Practice Book 5

Gifted and Talented Math 5 A

Description:
For qualifying students, this first-semester cours reinforces students’ understanding of mathematical concepts in preparation for higher level courses. Students learn to create, analyze, and interpret graphs in their study of statistics. Geometry continues to be explored, with students classifying polygons and using measurement skills to find the perimeter, area, and volume of geometric figures. In addition to learning basic probability and permutations, students begin their algebra studies with solving equations and inequalities.

Units:

Decimals and Integers

In this unit, you will learn to describe arithmetic and geometric sequences and use them to make predictions. You will graph quadratic and absolute value functions as well as use tables, rules, and graphs to model exponential growth and decay. You will identify and evaluate polynomials, and then add and subtract polynomials by using models and by combining like terms. You will also use an area model to multiply polynomials. Finally, you will use the Distributive Property to multiply two binomials and write a polynomial as the product of a monomial (GCF) and a polynomial.

Equations and Inequalities

In this unit, you will examine algebraic expressions and you will write and solve many types, including one-step and two-step equations. You will use your knowledge of expressions to help you understand inequalities and how to manipulate them. Finally, you will graph and write inequalities, as well as use multiplication and division to solve inequalities.

Exponents, Factors, and Fractions

In this unit, you will expand your knowledge of the order of operations with the inclusion of exponents. Scientific notation will be used to express unmanageable numbers. You will continue to work with fractions, simplifying, and changing fractions into mixed numbers and improper fractions. Finally, you will be introduced to rational numbers and the relationships between them, as well as fractions and decimals.

Operations With Fractions

In this unit, you will use your knowledge of fractions more extensively. You will add and subtract fractions and mixed numbers. You will practice multiplying and dividing fractions and problem solving using the Try, Check, and Revise method. Finally, you will explore the concept of precision.

Ratios, Rates, and Proportions

In this unit, you will examine equal ratios and determine whether they, or other ratios, can form proportions. Then, you will be introduced to the concept of using proportions to solve problems involving scale. Using your knowledge of proportions, you will learn to solve problems in new ways.

Percents

Course Sets

  • GT Math (5)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Gifted and Talented Math 5 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Prentice Hall Mathematics: Course 2

Workbook

  • PH Course 2 Study Guide and Practice Workbook

Gifted and Talented Math 5 B

Description:
For qualifying students, this second-semester course reinforces students’ understanding of mathematical concepts in preparation for higher level courses. Students learn to create, analyze, and interpret graphs in their study of statistics. Geometry continues to be explored, with students classifying polygons and using measurement skills to find the perimeter, area, and volume of geometric figures. In addition to learning basic probability and permutations, students begin their algebra studies with solving equations and inequalities.

Units:

Geometry

In this unit, you will explore plane geometry, including lines and angles that will become very important as you begin to study geometry. You will begin measuring angles, and classifying them according to their measures. Once you grasp the concept of the figures, you will learn about bisectors and how these lines can become shapes and polygons. Finally, you will discover congruent figures and the many dimensions of circles and circle graphs.

Geometry and Measurement

In this unit, you will use your knowledge about geometry to estimate and find the area of shapes. The previous unit covered how to identify the parts of a circle and now you will use this knowledge to find the area. You will also learn how to determine surface area and volume of various figures. Finally, you will examine squares and square roots.

Patterns and Rules

In this unit, you will take a detailed look at sequences, patterns, and functions and decide what information is valuable for your purpose. Then, you will examine tables, graphs, and formulas to solve problems. Finally, you will solve problems that involve simple and compound interest.

Graphing in the Coordinate Plane

In this unit, you will use your knowledge of graphing and expand it to understand how to find the slope of a line. You will work within the coordinate plane to determine the relationships between lines and points in all of the quadrants. Finally, you will explore nonlinear relationships and the different ways that shapes can move on a plane: reflection, rotation, and symmetry.

Displaying and Analyzing Data

In this unit, you will use different visual applications to graph and display data. Some applications include frequency tables, box-and whisker plots, scatter plots, stem-and-leaf plots, histograms, and spreadsheets. You will read about sampling and random surveys to collect information.

Using Probability

In this unit, you will work with both theoretical and experimental probability. You will be given various circumstances in which to use probability and understand that it is an important aspect of mental math. Finally, permutations and combinations will be used to help you master the complexity of geometry.

Course Sets

  • GT Math (5)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Gifted and Talented Math 5 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Prentice Hall Mathematics: Course 2

Workbook

  • PH Course 2 Study Guide and Practice Workbook

Math 5 A

Description:
While further refining their skills of the four mathematical operations, students are introduced to more complex activities, such as adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing decimals, fractions, and fractions with mixed numbers. Students are introduced to the order of operations and learn how to solve and write equations and inequalities. The study of geometry becomes more involved as students learn about polygons and solid figures. Students also extend their knowledge of graphing and probability to include circle graphs and using statistics to make predictions.

Units:

Numeration, Addition, and Subtraction

This unit reinforces a solid comprehension of the base ten numeration system. As your student delves deeper into place value throughout this course, he will extend his ability to read, order, compare, round, and represent numbers to the billions and the thousandths place values. Proficiency of the concepts presented in this unit will provide your student with the foundation to grasp more complex math concepts.

Also in this unit, your student will apply his knowledge of basic addition and subtraction facts to solve addition and subtraction problems involving whole numbers and decimals. As your student learns to estimate and compute whole number and decimal sums, he will use his background knowledge of place value to model the process of adding and subtracting with and without regrouping. Several properties of addition and the compatible numbers strategy are used to further develop your student’s addition skills. This unit will provide your student with meaningful computational practice through word problems that are presented in authentic contexts. This unit’s problem-solving strategies are “look for a pattern,” “draw a picture and write an equation,” and “multiple-step problems.”

Multiplying Whole Numbers

In this unit, your student will use place-value patterns and four properties of multiplication to multiply whole numbers of greater value. Your student will learn to simplify multiplication, especially when multiplying with multiples of 10, 100, and 1,000. Your student’s prior mastery of basic multiplication facts will allow her to focus on new concepts, such as partial products and the traditional algorithm, to solve multi–digit multiplication problems. The problem solving strategy in this unit is “draw a picture and write an equation.”

Dividing by 1-Digit Divisors

In this unit, your student will estimate and divide up to four-digit dividends by single-digit divisors. Your student will learn to simplify division, especially when dividing with a dividend that is a multiple of 10 and 100. Since relating multiplication to division serves as an efficient strategy for solving division problems, your student should be fluent with his multiplication facts. In doing so, your student will be able to concentrate on learning new skills, such as dividing within the context of money, dividing with zeros in the quotient, and dividing to find factors of whole numbers. Your student will also study the concepts of prime and composite numbers. The problem-solving strategies in this unit are “reasonableness” and “draw a picture and write an equation.”

Dividing by 2-Digit Divisors

In this unit, your student estimate quotients and divide up to five-digit dividends with two-digit divisors. The solutions to these division problems include one-digit and two-digit quotients, as well as quotients with a remainder. Basic multiplication facts will help your student find the quotient to division problems whose dividends and divisors are multiples of 10. This unit’s problem-solving strategies are “multiple-step problems” and “missing or extra information.”

Variables and Expressions

In this unit, your student will estimate quotients and divide up to five-digit dividends with two-digit divisors. The solutions to these division problems include one-digit and two-digit quotients, as well as quotients with a remainder. Basic multiplication facts will help your student find the quotient to division problems whose dividends and divisors are multiples of 10. This unit’s problem-solving strategies are “multiple-step problems” and “missing or extra information.”

Multiplying and Dividing Decimals

In this unit, your student will use mental math strategies to estimate products and quotients of problems involving decimals. Your student will apply the standard algorithm to multiply a decimal by a whole number and to multiply a decimal by another decimal. The steps for dividing decimals using the standard algorithm will also be taught to divide a decimal by a whole number and to divide a decimal by another decimal. This unit’s problem-solving strategy is “multiple-step problems.”

Shapes

In this unit, your student will learn about points, lines, and planes, the building blocks used to describe other geometric figures. Your student will recognize the appropriate labels that are needed in drawings of lines and rays. Also, your student will examine how to say specific lines and rays and how to write them with proper notation. Using a protractor, your student will measure and draw angles of varying degrees. Polygons are named by the number of sides and angles they possess, and your student will learn to identify and describe different polygons based on such attributes. While taking a closer look at triangles, your student will find that triangles fall into classifications according to the length of their sides or by the size of their angles. Your student will also investigate the classification system of quadrilaterals.

Fractions and Decimals

In this unit, your student will identify fractional parts of a whole region and whole set. Your student will learn how division relates to fractions through the process of dividing a whole into equal parts. This unit will explain how to show equivalent fractions, express fractions in simplest form, and write mixed numbers and improper fractions interchangeably. Your student will also learn how to write tenths, hundredths, and thousandths as decimals and fractions interchangeably. Determining greatest common factor and comparing and ordering on a number line are other concepts and skills included in this unit. The problem–solving strategy in this unit is “writing to explain.”

Adding and Subtracting Fractions and Mixed Numbers

In this unit, your student will use fraction models and computation skills to add and subtract fractions and mixed numbers with like and unlike denominators. Your student will study the process of finding the least common multiple of two numbers in order to change unlike denominators into like denominators for addition and subtraction purposes. The problem-solving strategy in this unit is “try, check, and revise.”

Course Sets

  • Math (5)

Kit

  • Math 3-5 Kit

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Math 5 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Scott Foresman enVisionMATH 5

Supplies

  • Base-ten flats, green (1 set)
  • Base-ten rods, green (10)
  • Base-ten units, green (20 cubes)
  • Coins (44)
  • Counters, 2-color (20)
  • Dollar bills (40)
  • Game spinner, blank (1)
  • Number cubes, blank with 50 labels (2)
  • Tiles, color (20)
  • Tiles, fraction (51)

Workbook

  • SF enVisionMATH 5 Interactive Homework Workbook

Math 5 B

Description:
While further refining their skills of the four mathematical operations, students are introduced to more complex activities, such as adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing decimals, fractions, and fractions with mixed numbers. Students are introduced to the order of operations and learn how to solve and write equations and inequalities. The study of geometry becomes more involved as students learn about polygons and solid figures. Students also extend their knowledge of graphing and probability to include circle graphs and using statistics to make predictions.

Units:

Multiplying Fractions and Mixed Numbers

In this unit, your student will learn to multiply a fraction by a whole number and by another fraction. Multiplication of mixed numbers is another concept that is presented in this unit. Several methods, such as using repeated addition, drawing a picture, and computing products, are used to develop the concepts of multiplying with fractions and multiplying with mixed numbers. The problem-solving strategy in this unit is “draw a picture and write a number sentence.”

Perimeter and Area

In this unit, your student will learn to select appropriate tools and units to measure length in the customary and metric systems. Your student will measure with greater precision by finding length to the nearest inch, half inch, quarter inch, and eighth inch in the customary system and to the nearest centimeter and millimeter in the metric system. Using formulas, your student will find the perimeter of polygons, area of squares, rectangles, and triangles, and circumference of circles. Additionally, your student will use a formula to find the area of a parallelogram and to determine the side-lengths of a parallelogram, given the area and the length of one side. This unit’s problem-solving strategy is “draw a picture and make an organized list.”

Solids

This unit allows your student to examine solids in greater detail. To begin, your student will name the attributes of solid figures by their faces, edges, and vertices. Your student will identify two-dimensional shapes that constitute solid figures, as he examines nets that form solid figures upon folding. Also, your student will explore the views of solids from the various perspectives of looking from the top, front, and side. Determining surface area in square units and volume in cubic units are concepts that are studied in this unit. The problem-solving strategy in this unit is “use objects and solve a simpler problem.”

Measurement Units, Time, and Temperature

In this unit, your student will learn to select appropriate tools and units to measure capacity and weight in the customary system and volume and mass in the metric system. Using multiplication and division, your student will convert units of measure within the same system. Next your student will study elapsed time, start time, and end time, and use models and computations to solve problems involving minutes, hours, days, and weeks. Your student will also study temperature changes in both degrees Fahrenheit and degrees Celsius. The use of real measuring tools, such as thermometers, scales, and clocks, as well as real items, such as cups and daily schedules, will add meaning to your student’s study of measurement. This unit’s problem-solving strategy is “make a table.”

Solving and Writing Equations and Inequalities

This unit provides your student further practice with variables. The variables in this unit are used in equations that involve addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division. Your student will learn to isolate the variable in an equation in order to solve for the unknown number. Variables will also be used in inequalities. Your student will learn to solve for the variable and represent the solutions on a number line. Finally, your student will identify and write an equation for the pattern or relationship that exists between pairs of numbers that are recorded within a table. This unit’s problem-solving strategy is “draw a picture and write an equation.”

Ratio and Percent

In this unit, your student will learn how to read and write ratios and percents. Your student may recall her work with equivalent fractions as she studies equal ratios. The study of percents will acquaint your student with various real-world contexts that involve percentages. Additionally, your student will develop understanding and skill in writing fractions, decimals, and percents interchangeably and in determining a given percent of a whole number.

Equations and Graphs

In this unit, your student will study integers. A number line will give your student a visual of the sequence of positive and negative numbers and develop his understanding of integer values. Your student will use number lines on a coordinate plane to graph ordered pairs of integers. The study of integers will also include determining the distance between two integers and generating a list of ordered pairs, given the values of one variable in a given equation. The problem-solving strategy in this unit is “work backward.”

Graphs and Data

In this unit, your student will encounter real-world problems that require collecting, organizing, displaying, analyzing, and interpreting data. Your student will learn how to collect data in an organized way by using frequency tables. She will learn how to display the different types of data, using bar graphs, picture graphs, line graphs, stem-and-leaf plots, histograms, and circle graphs. Next your student will interpret the data that is displayed and describe the data by finding the mean, median, mode, and range. The problem-solving strategy in this unit is “make a graph.”

Transformations, Congruence, and Symmetry

This unit will allow your student to explore translations, reflections, and rotations of figures on a coordinate plane. By drawing and describing the movements on a coordinate plane, your student will see how the ordered pairs of the original figure change, depending on the type of movement that occurs. Your student will also examine congruent figures that have been translated, reflected, and/or rotated. Symmetry is another concept that is studied in this unit.

Probability

In this unit your student will encounter various experiments as she studies probability. Your student will use a tree diagram or multiplication to list possible outcomes for an event. Theoretical and experimental probabilities will be represented in fractional form, from which your student will make predictions about an event. This unit’s problem-solving strategy is “solve a simpler problem.”

Course Sets

  • Math (5)

Kit

  • Math 3-5 Kit

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Math 5 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Scott Foresman enVisionMATH 5

Supplies

  • Base-ten flats, green (1 set)
  • Base-ten rods, green (10)
  • Base-ten units, green (20 cubes)
  • Coins (44)
  • Counters, 2-color (20)
  • Dollar bills (40)
  • Game spinner, blank (1)
  • Number cubes, blank with 50 labels (2)
  • Tiles, color (20)
  • Tiles, fraction (51)

Workbook

  • SF enVisionMATH 5 Interactive Homework Workbook

Gifted and Talented Science 5 A

Description:
This exciting course encourages students to see themselves as scientists by empowering them to make their own discoveries. Students begin by studying the roles of scientists and the scientific method and then explore the Earth and life sciences in the context of the discoverer. In life science, they study cells and heredity. In Earth science, students design their own experiments for investigating the earth’s composition and the factors affecting that composition. A range of activity-based learning and traditional instruction engages students of diverse learning styles.

Units:

Be A Scientist

In this introductory unit, your student will learn about the scientific method through the actions of two scientists who work for the American Museum of Natural History. Your student will learn how biologists Liliana and Susan use the steps of the scientific method to explore how diseases affect organisms. He will read how this process helps them study the parasite that causes a particular disease called malaria.

During this unit, your student will be introduced to several skills that he will use throughout this course. He will learn how to test a hypothesis and how to analyze data and form conclusions. Your student will also learn about science safety and why it’s important to follow safety rules in any science laboratory.

Cells and Kingdoms

In this unit, your student will explore different forms of life on Earth. She will carefully study plant and animal cells and will identify unicellular and multicellular organisms. Your student will delve deeper into the subject of organ systems; she will learn about the specific functions of organs within a system and will conduct an experiment on the heart.

During the unit, your student will review how organisms are classified into the following groups: kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, and species. She will differentiate between animals that are vertebrates and invertebrates, and plants that are vascular and nonvascular. Your student will also take a closer look at bacteria and viruses. By the end of the unit, your student will have studied plant and animal classification in great detail.

Lesson 12  is a student-selected project. The student will be able to choose from three options relating to the unit. A rubric is included and will be used for scoring purposes.

Parents and Offspring

In this unit, your student will explore plant and animal life cycles. He will review the parts of a flower and will differentiate between perfect and imperfect flowers. He will also review the stages of complete metamorphosis and will learn how fertilization occurs in animals. Your student will study sexual and asexual reproduction and will learn why organisms reproduce in different ways.

During the unit, your student will learn about heredity, or the passing of traits from parents to offspring. Your student will learn about inherited traits and will explore the difference between dominant and recessive traits. By the end of this unit, your student should be able to explain how an organism can inherit a gene for a specific trait, such as blue eye color.

Three options for a student-selected project are explained in Lesson 7. Your student will select one of the three options and complete a project relating to the unit concepts.

Interactions in Ecosystems

In this unit, your student will explore connections between organisms in an ecosystem. She will learn where producers, consumers, and decomposers fall within a food chain and will identify examples of herbivores, carnivores, and omnivores. Your student will explore how energy flows through each layer of an ecosystem—how it moves from the bottom to the top of a food pyramid.

During the unit, your student will learn how some organisms compete with each other for resources, while other organisms do things to help each other survive. Your student will learn about the following symbiotic relationships: mutualism, commensalism, and parasitism. She will also learn how organisms develop structural and/or behavioral adaptations so they can survive in a changing environment.

Lesson 5 gives your student an option of three projects relating to the unit. Your student will select one of the options and complete the project before submitting it during Lesson 7.

Ecosystems and Biomes

In this unit, your student will explore ecosystems and biomes. He will study cycles in ecosystems, including the water cycle, the carbon cycle, and the nitrogen cycle; and he will be able to explain why they are important. Your student will also study changes in ecosystems and how drastic changes can cause extinction.

During the unit, your student will read about the following biomes: desert, tundra, taiga, tropical rain forest, temperate rain forest, deciduous forest, and grassland. He will also explore ecosystems that are composed of fresh water, salt water, or a mixture of both. Your student will gain a clear understanding of different environments on Earth.

Your student will select one of three project options presented in Lesson 10. Each option relates to the concepts of this unit. The completed project will be due at the end of the unit.

Our Dynamic Earth

In this unit, your student will learn about Earth’s structure. She will explore features on Earth’s surface and on the ocean floor, and will define the following terms: atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, asthenosphere, and biosphere. Your student will also explore topography and she will make a model of a topographic map.

During the unit, your student will learn how plate tectonics is related to mountain formation, volcanic eruptions, and earthquakes. She will watch several movies that explain this relationship in detail. Finally, your student will study weathering and erosion. She will be able to differentiate between chemical and physical weathering, and explain the processes of erosion and deposition.

Lesson 7 is a student-selected project. The student will be able to choose from three options relating to the unit. A rubric is included and will be used for scoring purposes.

Protecting Earth’s Resources

In this unit, your student will investigate Earth’s natural resources, including minerals, coal, oil, natural gas, water, and air. He will explore how fossil fuels formed and how fossils help scientists determine the age of rock layers. Your student will also learn how fossil fuels are used and will define renewable and nonrenewable resources.

During the unit, your student will conduct an experiment that will take several days to complete. He will determine what kind of soil is best for plant growth. Your student will finish the unit by reading and watching videos on air and water. He will learn why air and water are considered resources and how pollution affects them.

Course Sets

  • GT Science (5)

Kit

  • Science 5 Kit

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Gifted and Talented Science 5 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText McGraw-Hill Science: A Closer Look 5

Supplies

  • Cobalt chloride paper
  • Compass
  • Goggles, safety
  • Graduated Cylinder (100 mL)
  • Litmus paper
  • Magnet, bar (set of 2)
  • Modeling clay
  • Switch (2)
  • Thermometers (2)

Workbook

  • McGraw-Hill Science: Activity Lab Book 5
  • McGraw-Hill Science: Reading and Writing 5

Gifted and Talented Science 5 B

Description:
Students continue their journeys as scientific explorers, studying the living world in life science and the characteristics of matter, sound, and light in our physical science unit. In the Earth science unit, students investigate the Earth’s composition and the forces shaping its surface. Students continue to explore the scientific method and careers in science.

Units:

Weather Patterns

In this unit, your student will explore weather patterns. He will learn how clouds form and why certain types of severe storms occur in specific locations. From the layers of the atmosphere to global climates, your student will explore the diverse nature of weather on Earth.

During the unit, your student will complete two labs. The first lab will require him to use the scientific inquiry skill of communication to investigate balloons. The second lab focuses on evaporation. It includes a follow-up investigation on the rate of evaporation.

The final lesson in this unit introduces the long-term project. In this lesson, your student will be given the project guidelines as well as the project rubric and a list of possible topics. Your student will be given opportunities to work on the long-term project during each remaining unit.

The Universe

In this unit, your student will read and watch movies about various aspects of the universe. She will learn about the solar system as a whole—and will then explore the relationship between the Earth, moon, and sun. Your student will read about human exploration and the solar system.

During the unit, your student will study stars. She will learn about the colors and sizes of stars, and will be able to explain the life cycle of a star in detail. Your student will also complete a hands-on experiment to determine how craters form on planets and their moons. By the end of the unit, your student will have a better understanding of the universe.

Your student will complete the project proposal for the long-term science project and submit it to her teacher for approval during this unit.

Comparing Kinds of Matter

In this unit, your student will begin to explore matter and its properties. Your student will study the periodic table and will read about different types of elements, including metals and nonmetals. He will also explore electrical conductivity with relation to metals and nonmetals.

During the unit, your student will learn about the structure of matter and will be able to identify the parts of an atom. He will learn how to compare different kinds of matter and will explore matter in its different states. Finally, your student will learn how to make a scientific inference by completing the Inquiry Skill activity, Infer.

Your student will conduct the experiment for his long-term science project during the course of this unit.

Physical and Chemical Changes

In this unit, your student will focus on learning about physical and chemical changes in matter. She will explore how mixtures form and will investigate whether or not a mixture can be separated into its parts. She will also investigate what temperature of water freezes the fastest—hot, warm, cool, or cold.

During the unit, your student will complete reading assignments about chemical changes, as well as acids and bases. She will learn how to determine whether a reaction is a chemical reaction or a physical reaction. She will also learn how salts are formed.

The experiment for the long-term science project will be completed and the lab report sheet submitted. The student will choose a product from three options and begin work on the selected product for the long-range project presentation.

Using Forces

In this unit, your student will learn about forces and motion. He will complete labs that will require him to measure the acceleration of a model car and measure the effect of friction on the energy of an object. Your student will also investigate the six different types of simple machines.

During the unit, your student will learn how motion is affected by the force of gravity. He will define balanced and unbalanced forces and will explore Newton’s three laws of motion. Finally, your student will learn how energy is related to work.

The product choice for the long-term science project presentation will be completed during this unit.

Using Energy

In this final unit, your student will explore various types of energy: heat, sound, light, electricity, and magnetism. She will complete three labs that will require her to develop a hypothesis about heat flow, explore the pitch of a sound, and examine the polarity of a magnet.

During the unit, your student will learn how to differentiate between heat and temperature. She will also learn how light travels and how colors are made. By the end of this unit, your student will have a better understanding of different forms of energy and how energy is used.

The graded long-term science project will be returned to your student. Lesson time will be given for suggested revisions. Completed projects will be shared with other students during a sharing session.

Course Sets

  • GT Science (5)

Kit

  • Science 5 Kit

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Gifted and Talented Science 5 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText McGraw-Hill Science: A Closer Look 5

Supplies

  • Cobalt chloride paper
  • Compass
  • Goggles, safety
  • Graduated Cylinder (100 mL)
  • Litmus paper
  • Magnet, bar (set of 2)
  • Modeling clay
  • Switch (2)
  • Thermometers (2)

Workbook

  • McGraw-Hill Science: Activity Lab Book 5
  • McGraw-Hill Science: Reading and Writing 5

Science 5 A

Description:
Science is an ongoing process that constantly renders new discoveries! In this first semester course, the student will be sharpening his investigative skills and expanding upon his existing knowledge in order to make his own new discoveries. The McGraw-Hill textbook, Science: A Closer Look, and the science kit are the primary resources for the course. The opening unit  explores the role of scientists and the scientific method. The life science units explore cells and heredity. The Earth science units provide an opportunity for the student to design experiments to investigate Earth’s composition and the factors that affect its composition.

The lessons in this course are designed to accommodate many learning styles, and to provide a variety of opportunities for the entire family to participate in the student’s education. Some lessons, or groups of lessons, in each unit are activity-centered, which allow the student to engage the new concepts he encounters through exploration and discovery; others are more traditional, requiring the student to read, research, and reflect on the underlying theory.

Units:

Be a Scientist

In this introductory unit, your student will learn about the scientific method through the actions of two scientists who work for the American Museum of Natural History. Your student will learn how biologists Liliana and Susan use the steps of the scientific method to explore how diseases affect organisms. He will read how this process helps them study the parasite that causes a particular disease called malaria.

During this unit, your student will be introduced to several skills that he will use throughout this course. He will learn how to test a hypothesis and how to analyze data and form conclusions. Your student will also learn about science safety and why it’s important to follow safety rules in any science laboratory.

Cells and Kingdoms

In this unit, your student will explore different forms of life on Earth. She will carefully study plant and animal cells and will identify unicellular and multicellular organisms. Your student will delve deeper into the subject of organ systems; she will learn about the specific functions of organs within a system and will conduct an experiment on the heart.

During the unit, your student will review how organisms are classified into the following groups: kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, and species. She will differentiate between animals that are vertebrates and invertebrates, and plants that are vascular and nonvascular. Your student will also take a closer look at bacteria and viruses. By the end of the unit, your student will have studied plant and animal classification in great detail.

Parents and Offspring

In this unit, your student will explore plant and animal life cycles. He will review the parts of a flower and will differentiate between perfect and imperfect flowers. He will also review the stages of complete metamorphosis and will learn how fertilization occurs in animals. Your student will study sexual and asexual reproduction and will learn why organisms reproduce in different ways.

During the unit, your student will learn about heredity, or the passing of traits from parents to offspring. Your student will learn about inherited traits and will explore the difference between dominant and recessive traits. By the end of this unit, your student should be able to explain how an organism can inherit a gene for a specific trait, such as blue eye color.

Interactions in Ecosystems

In this unit, your student will explore connections between organisms in an ecosystem. She will learn where producers, consumers, and decomposers fall within a food chain and will identify examples of herbivores, carnivores, and omnivores. Your student will explore how energy flows through each layer of an ecosystem—how it moves from the bottom to the top of a food pyramid.

During the unit, your student will learn how some organisms compete with each other for resources, while other organisms do things to help each other survive. Your student will learn about the following symbiotic relationships: mutualism, commensalism, and parasitism. She will also learn how organisms develop structural and/or behavioral adaptations so they can survive in a changing environment.

Ecosystems and Biomes

In this unit, your student will explore ecosystems and biomes. He will study cycles in ecosystems, including the water cycle, the carbon cycle, and the nitrogen cycle–and will be able to explain why they are important. Your student will also study changes in ecosystems and how drastic changes can cause extinction.

During the unit, your student will read about the following biomes: desert, tundra, taiga, tropical rain forest, temperate rain forest, deciduous forest, and grassland. He will also explore ecosystems that are composed of fresh water, salt water, or a mixture of both. Your student will gain a clear understanding of different environments on Earth.

Our Dynamic Earth

In this unit, your student will learn about Earth’s structure. She will explore features on Earth’s surface and on the ocean floor, and will define the following terms: atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, asthenosphere, and biosphere. Your student will also explore topography and she will make a model of a topographic map.

During the unit, your student will learn how plate tectonics is related to mountain formation, volcanic eruptions, and earthquakes. She will watch several movies that explain this relationship in detail. Finally, your student will study weathering and erosion. She will be able to differentiate between chemical and physical weathering, and explain the processes of erosion and deposition.

Protecting Earth’s Resources

In this unit, your student will investigate Earth’s natural resources, including minerals, coal, oil, natural gas, water, and air. He will explore how fossil fuels formed and how fossils help scientists determine the age of rock layers. Your student will also learn how fossil fuels are used and will define renewable and nonrenewable resources.

During the unit, your student will conduct an experiment that will take several days to complete. He will determine what kind of soil is best for plant growth. Your student will finish the unit by reading and watching videos on air and water. He will learn why air and water are considered resources and how pollution affects them.

Course Sets

  • Science (5)

Kit

  • Science 5 Kit

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Science 5 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText McGraw-Hill Science: A Closer Look 5

Supplies

  • Cobalt chloride paper
  • Compass
  • Goggles, safety
  • Graduated Cylinder (100 mL)
  • Litmus paper
  • Magnet, bar (set of 2)
  • Modeling clay
  • Switch (2)
  • Thermometers (2)

Workbook

  • McGraw-Hill Science: Reading and Writing 5

Science 5 B

Description:
Students sharpen their investigative skills and expand their scientific knowledge in order to make new discoveries. They learn about the living world in the life science units. The physical science units examine the characteristics of matter, sound, and light. The Earth science units provide an opportunity for students to investigate Earth’s composition and the factors that shape its surface. Students continue to explore the scientific method and science careers.

Units:

Weather Patterns

In this unit, your student will explore weather patterns. She will learn how clouds form and why certain types of severe storms occur in specific locations. From the layers of the atmosphere to global climates, your student will explore the diverse nature of weather on Earth.

During the unit, your student will complete two labs. The first lab will require her to use the scientific inquiry skill of communication to investigate balloons. The second lab will give her the opportunity to form a hypothesis and conduct a hands-on experiment to determine if water vapor is in the air.

The Universe

In this unit, your student will read and watch movies about various aspects of the universe. He will learn about the solar system, as a whole—and will then explore the relationship between the Earth, moon, and sun. Your student will read about human exploration and the solar system.

During the unit, your student will study stars. He will learn about the colors and sizes of stars, and will be able to explain the life cycle of a star in detail. Your student will also complete a hands-on experiment to determine how craters form on planets and their moons. By the end of the unit, your student will have a better understanding of the universe.

Comparing Kinds of Matter

In this unit, your student will begin to explore matter and its properties. Your student will study the periodic table and will read about different types of elements, including metals and nonmetals. She will also explore electrical conductivity with relation to metals and nonmetals.

During the unit, your student will learn about the structure of matter and will be able to identify the parts of an atom. She will learn how to compare different kinds of matter and will explore matter in its different states. Finally, your student will learn how to make a scientific inference by completing the Inquiry Skill activity, Infer.

Physical and Chemical Changes

In this unit, your student will focus on learning about physical and chemical changes in matter. He will explore how mixtures form and will investigate whether or not a mixture can be separated into its parts. He will also investigate what temperature of water freezes the fastest—hot, warm, cool, or cold.

During the unit, your student will complete reading assignments about chemical changes, and acids and bases. He will learn how to determine whether a reaction is a chemical reaction or a physical reaction. He will also learn how salts are formed.

Using Forces

In this unit, your student will learn about forces and motion. She will complete labs that will require her to measure the acceleration of a model car and measure the effect of friction on the energy of an object. Your student will also investigate the six different types of simple machines.

During the unit, your student will learn how motion is affected by the force of gravity. She will define balanced and unbalanced forces and will explore Newton’s three laws of motion. Finally, your student will learn how energy is related to work.

Using Energy

In this final unit, your student will explore various types of energy: heat, sound, light, electricity, and magnetism. He will complete three labs that will require him to develop a hypothesis about heat flow, explore the pitch of a sound, and examine the polarity of a magnet.

During the unit, your student will learn how to differentiate between heat and energy. He will also learn how light travels and how colors are made. By the end of this unit, your student will have a better understanding of different forms of energy and how energy is used.

Course Sets

  • Science (5)

Kit

  • Science 5 Kit

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Science 5 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText McGraw-Hill Science: A Closer Look 5

Supplies

  • Cobalt chloride paper
  • Compass
  • Goggles, safety
  • Graduated Cylinder (100 mL)
  • Litmus paper
  • Magnet, bar (set of 2)
  • Modeling clay
  • Switch (2)
  • Thermometers (2)

Workbook

  • McGraw-Hill Science: Reading and Writing 5

Social Studies 5 A

Description:
Using a thematic and chronological approach to United States history, this course allows students to trace the nation’s history from the time of the earliest Americans through the 21st century. Students practice map skills as they learn about the growth of the Unites States, and develop their abilities to interpret sources, compare, and sequence. Students also learn about geography’s influence on culture and historical events.

Units:

Early Life, East and West

In this unit, your student will learn about the migration of large groups of people many years ago. He will focus on how past Native American and European groups moved to and settled in different regions throughout the Americas. He will also understand those factors that encouraged Europeans to travel to unknown, distant places, far from Europe.

Connections Across Continents

In this unit, your student will learn how European exploration led to settlements along North America’s east coast. She will first learn how Christopher Columbus’s journeys led to the establishment of Spanish colonies in the Americas with settlements by the English, French and Dutch to soon follow. She will also understand how European settlement affected Native Americans and the worldwide impact of the Columbian exchange.

Colonial Life in North America

In this unit, your student will learn how resources in the Southern, Middle, and Northern colonies helped each region prosper. He will recognize the colonists’ desire to seek additional opportunities by moving to the lands west of the colonies. He will also study the causes and effects of the French and Indian War.

The American Revolution

In this unit, your student will learn how British rule resulted in conflict with the colonists. She will learn about the political and economic issues between Great Britain and the colonies that ultimately led to the American Revolution. She will trace the course of the war and its impact on the colonies.

Life in a New Nation

In this unit, your student will examine some of the political accomplishments of the new nation. He will learn how representatives from all states met in Philadelphia to adopt a new constitution. He will also learn about the birth of political parties, various efforts taken to expand the political boundaries of the nation westward, and the War of 1812.

CD/DVD

  • SF Digital Learning CD-ROM: The United States

Course Sets

  • Social Studies (5)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Social Studies 5 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText SF Social Studies: The United States

Workbook

  • Scott Foresman The United States Workbook

Social Studies 5 B

Description:
Using a thematic and chronological approach to United States history, this course allows students to trace the nation’s history from the time of the earliest Americans through the 21st century. Students practice map skills as they learn about the growth of the Unites States, and develop their abilities to interpret sources, compare, and sequence. Students also learn about geography’s influence on culture and historical events.

Units:

A Growing Nation

In this unit, your student will learn how the nineteenth century was marked as a time of change in the United States. She will learn how changes occurred in government, technology, and civil rights. She will also learn how the southern and western regions of the United States changed by the migration of people moving to those regions.

War Divides the Nation

In this unit, your student will examine the differences between the Northern and Southern states. He will study how these differences created tension and conflict between the two regions of the country. He will learn how such tension led to the succession of many Southern states. Your student will also understand how constant, ongoing tension escalated to the U.S. Civil War.

Expansion and Change

In this unit, your student will learn how change impacted human population. She will understand how innovations in transportation influenced settlement of the Western region of the United States, but also created tension between Native Americans and settlers. Your student will also learn how new technologies brought changes to society, including new jobs, cultural change, and immigration.

The United States and the World

In this unit, your student will learn how the United States increased its involvement in foreign affairs. He will focus on America’s involvement and participation in World War I and World War II. He will also explore the reasons behind the Cold War, and your student will focus on the United States’ involvement during the Cold War era. He will complete an independent research project on one of the major events of the 20th century.

CD/DVD

  • SF Digital Learning CD-ROM: The United States

Course Sets

  • Social Studies (5)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Social Studies 5 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText SF Social Studies: The United States

Workbook

  • Scott Foresman The United States Workbook

Educational Technology and Online Learning 5

Description:
In the Educational Technology and Online Learning course, students develop skills in file management, document creation, and advanced email programs. Students also create multimedia projects citing copyrighted materials. Internet safety skills include identifying safe and age-appropriate gathering places and choosing secure passwords and screen names.

Units:

Introduction

This is a tutorial lesson that the Learning Coach and student should complete prior to starting the K to the 8th Power technology curriculum.

Internet Safety

In this unit, your student will learn about Internet safety. The goal of the lessons in this unit is to educate your student on how to avoid dangerous, inappropriate, or unlawful online behavior. Your student will become aware of the dangers associated with the Internet by reading stories and scenarios, learning safety tips, and completing related activities.National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS-S) Performance Indicators:

All students should have opportunities to demonstrate the following performances. Prior to completion of Grade 5, students will:1. Use keyboards and other common input and output devices (including adaptive devices when necessary) efficiently and effectively.
2. Discuss common uses of technology in daily life and the advantages and disadvantages those uses provide.
3. Discuss basic issues related to responsible use of technology and information and describe personal consequences of inappropriate use.
6. Use telecommunications efficiently and effectively to access remote information, communicate with others in support of direct and independent learning, and pursue personal interests.

NETS-S were developed by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE).

Keyboarding

In this course the student will review the keyboarding skills that may have been learned in a previous course. The focus of the lessons in this course will be to increase speed and accuracy while copying provided text. Finally, the student will complete a typing speed test.

Study Skills

The Study Skills unit will introduce your student to basic study skills. The lessons in this unit include listening skills, organizational skills, and other skills to help your student become a successful learner. Your student will learn how to set realistic goals and will have the opportunity to create her own goals for this course. The important skills taught in this unit apply not only to Educational Technology and Online Learning but to all academic areas, as well as to the real world.

Microsoft® Word

In this unit, your student will continue to explore the features of Microsoft® Word. He will learn how to correct spelling errors and edit e-mails, in addition to decoding words. He will also learn how to write an outline on a given topic, differentiate between fact and fiction, and understand the sequence of ideas when writing. Your student will also learn how to write a short paragraph around a main idea and identify and read various literature.

Microsoft® Excel

In this unit, your student will explore the features of Microsoft® Excel. Your student will be able to add and subtract fractions, in addition to determining area. She will also be able to distinguish between different types of literature. Your student will learn how to determine number prefixes, place value and select certain data to display.

Microsoft® PowerPoint

In this unit, your student will explore the capabilities of Microsoft® PowerPoint. In this unit, your student will learn various parts of speech, including nouns, verbs, and pronouns. He will also learn about antonyms, synonyms, and homonyms. Your student will learn about creating presentations from design templates, modifying existing presentations, and adding headers and footers to slides. He will also have the opportunity to create an outline in Microsoft Word, creating different heading levels, and importing iterms from Microsoft Word into his presentation.

Elective Courses

Elementary Chinese I

Description:
Chinese I is an introductory-level course that will introduce the student to Mandarin Chinese. In this course, the student will learn listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a variety of activities, including LiveLesson® sessions with a native Mandarin speaker! The units are designed to introduce the student to Chinese language and culture through familiar topics such as my family, my week, and food. Culture is presented throughout the course to help the student make connections between his culture and the culture of people in the Mandarin-speaking world.

Units:

My World

In this unit, you will begin to study Mandarin, the official language of China and many other countries. Millions of people around the world speak Mandarin. This unit will teach you about Mandarin’s importance in the world. You will also learn Mandarin words that describe your family. By the end of the unit, you will know how to introduce yourself and your family to others.

My Time

How is your life different from the life of a student who speaks Mandarin? In this unit, you will learn how students spend their time in countries where Mandarin is spoken. You will look for ways their activities are alike and different from yours. This unit will also introduce you to the Mandarin words that describe your everyday activities and time at school.

My Food

All cultures have different traditional foods, these are foods that are eaten for special occasions or have been eaten since a long time ago. Just like you have your own food traditions, other cultures have their own food traditions, too. In this unit, you will learn about food customs in Mandarin-speaking countries. You will also learn words that describe food in Mandarin.

Elementary Chinese II

Description:
In this course, the student will further develop communication skills as he listens, speaks, reads, and writes Mandarin Chinese at a more advanced level. The student will continue to learn about Chinese culture by exploring historic places in China and other Mandarin-speaking countries, and by learning about holidays and special traditions celebrated there. In addition, the student will practice Mandarin Chinese skills by continuing to converse with a native Mandarin speaker.

Units:

My Travels

In this unit, you will take a trip through historical places in China and other Mandarin-speaking countries. During this experience, you will learn to describe people, yourself, places, and types of transportation.

My Holidays

What holidays do you celebrate? The people in the Mandarin-speaking world may celebrate some of your favorite holidays. They also have their own special holidays, too. In this unit, you will learn about the important holidays celebrated in China and other Mandarin-speaking countries. You will learn about why the holiday is celebrated, its history, and its importance to students your age in the Mandarin-speaking world. You will compare what you learn about the Mandarin-speaking world with your own country.

My Home

What are homes like in the Mandarin-speaking world? How are they different from homes in the United States? In this unit, you will learn about a typical home in some Mandarin-speaking countries, including the uses for different rooms of the home. You will find out how the activities that happen in the rooms are alike and different from yours. In this unit, you will also learn the names of some objects that can be found in a home, like furniture, clothes, flowers, and pets.

Elementary Sign Language

Description:
In this course, students are introduced to the fundamental concepts of American Sign Language. Students explore vocabulary, grammar, and conversational skills using basic signing and fingerspelling techniques.

Units:

Intro

In this unit, your student will be introduced to American Sign Language, or ASL. He will study the history of ASL and learn how it became the standard language for deaf and hard of hearing people in North America. He will also learn about some of the accepted rules of etiquette in Deaf culture. This introductory unit also teaches your student how to sign the letters of the alphabet and the mechanics of fingerspelling.

Numbers

This unit introduces the signing of numbers. Your student will learn how to sign numbers 1–100, as well as the signs for dollars and cents. A variety of fun activities give your student a chance to practice using ASL to discuss counting and using money.

Time

In this unit, your student will study various aspects of time. Not only will he learn how to communicate time using ASL, he will also learn the signs for the 7 days of the week and the 12 months of the year. The signs for various holidays as well as the four seasons are also taught in this unit.

Nouns

Your student will learn the signs for some commonly used nouns. The categories of family, places, food, colors, and animals are explored as your student practices these signs to add to her growing library of American Sign Language knowledge.

Descriptions

The lessons in this unit will teach your student how to sign various descriptions using American Sign Language. He will learn how to sign descriptive words that express feelings, sizes, possessions, and locations. In addition, he will combine some previously taught signs for numbers, time, and nouns, with descriptive signs taught in this unit.

Elementary Spanish I

Description:
Elementary Spanish I is an introductory-level course that will introduce the student to Spanish. In this course, the student will learn listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a variety of activities, including LiveLesson® sessions with a native Spanish speaker! The units are designed to introduce the student to Spanish language and culture through familiar topics such as my family, my week, and food. Culture is presented throughout the course to help the student make connections between his culture and the culture of people in the Spanish-speaking world.

Elementary Spanish II

Description:
Children’s Spanish II employs a unique approach to building Spanish fluency quickly and effortlessly. The stories are first introduced in English and then retold a number of times with progressively more Spanish. Although the course focuses on the oral aspect of the language, there is more exposure to reading and writing than in the previous level. Fascinating information on Hispanic culture is gracefully interwoven into the captivating adventure stories.

Music III

Description:
The Music courses, with content developed by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, focus on teaching basic music concepts through traditional children’s songs and classical music examples. Students develop fine and gross motor skills that will enable them to keep a steady beat and learn rhythm instruments. Music III extends the student’s music reading skills.

Units:

The Basics: Beat, Rhythm, and Melody

In this unit your student will learn basic music concepts of beat, rhythm, melody, and pitch. Traditional children’s songs will be used to teach and reinforce these concepts. Your student will be encouraged to move to music in different ways to keep the steady heartbeat and learn basic rhythmic patterns. Listening activities and voice play will be used to help your student use a singing voice and learn basic melodic patterns.

Beat, Rhythm, and Meter

In this unit your student will further explore rhythmic concepts. She will keep a steady heartbeat though movement and by playing a drum. She will learn and read new rhythmic patterns. Then, investigate the difference between the steady heartbeat and a rhythm pattern. Your student will also discover meter, or how beats are grouped.

Melodic Patterns

In this unit traditional children’s songs will be used to teach melodic patterns. Your student will be introduced to the music staff and other music symbols. Your students will also begin to learn about harmony, singing partner songs, and in canon.

The Orchestra

In this unit, your student will examine the sections of the orchestra. She will listen to a variety of musical examples, including symphonies, concertos, solo pieces, and chamber music. The student will take a closer look at the string and woodwind sections; examining how sounds are produced, how instruments in one group are similar, and look at a small ensemble from each family. Finally, she will investigate the life of one of the most important composers, Ludwig van Beethoven.

More With Rhythm and Meter

In this unit your student will further develop his music reading skills. Using known rhythm values, he will discover new and more complex rhythmic patterns. Meter will be further explored. He will perform ostinatos with songs. Finally, he will compose and perform an ostinato.

More Melodic Patterns

In this unit your student will further explore melodic patterns and pitch relationships. Through singing and listening examples she will investigate music based on both the Do-pentatonic scale and the La-pentatonic scale. She will also sing in parts by singing in canon and a melodic ostinato.

Home Life

Description:
Here, students select from a number of projects that develop skills through fun, experiential learning projects. Activities include cooking, crafts, sewing, home maintenance, family outings, and genealogy. Recently added projects include Lemonade Stand and Backyard Ecosystems.

Units:

In the Kitchen

In the Garage

In the Store

In the Garden

In the Family

WebQuest

Description:
Students help scientists monitor frog and toad populations across the country using FrogWatch USA™. Managed by the Association of Zoos & Aquariums, FrogWatch USA uses data collected by students to develop new ways to protect amphibians, which are extremely sensitive to ecological changes. Students visit a local wetland site once a week, make careful observations, and submit their data online. This online project joins Connections Academy students and scientists around the country as they gather and analyze data.

One thought on “GRADE 5: K to 12 Curriculum Guide – National Connections Academy

  1. Pingback: Where K to 10 is BETTER than K to 12 | Multilingual Philippines

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