GRADE 7 (Middle School): K to 12 Curriculum Guide – National Connections Academy

National Connections Academy’s (NaCA) full course listing below is a comprehensive look at every course available for the Grade 7 (Middle School) level. The push to get into the K to 12 basic education program was, to be charitable about it, in part because of the proponents’ desire to upgrade our basic education program to improve the quality/skills of our student output/graduates and in part to keep up with the Joneses. Well, the following is posted here to show us what the Joneses are doing.

WARNING!!!!! THE FOLLOWING GRADE 7 (MIDDLE SCHOOL) COURSE GUIDE BY NATIONAL CONNECTIONS ACADEMY – WHICH IS NOT SANCTIONED BY DEPED — IS BEING POSTED HERE FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY:

Grade 7 Core Courses – Middle School

Health and Physical Education 7

Description:
Health education for seventh graders includes basic first aid, strategies to deal with peer pressure and conflicts, and the negative impact of drug use. Fitness-related concepts, such as frequency, intensity, and duration, show students proper ways to exercise and maintain fitness and health.

Units:

Understanding Health and Wellness

In this unit, you will learn about the health triangle, and find out about the difference between health and wellness. You will also identify the factors that influence health, skills that will help you stay healthy, and the importance of goals.
In the Physical Education portion of the lesson, you will learn about the the President’s Challenge. The President’s Challenge is a program created by the U. S. government that rewards students for being physically active and physically fit. You will learn about the history and guidelines of the Active Lifestyle Program, why staying active is important, and how to set activity goals and log results. By the end of this unit, you will have taken your first steps towards earning the Presidential Active Lifestyle Award.

Nutrition

In this unit, you will learn the six main classes of nutrients, what foods can be eaten to obtain nutrients, and what kinds of foods will keep you healthy according to the USDA food guidance system. You will find out how to choose healthy foods and analyze the key nutrients in a food product.

Mental and Emotional Health

In this unit, you will learn about self-concept, the traits of having a good self-concept, and ways to show your good character. You will also find out about stress and how to manage your stress to stay healthy. At the end of the unit, you will learn about emotional problems, the warning signs of suicide, and help for emotional problems.

Resolving Conflicts and Preventing Violence

In this unit, you will learn about the nature, causes, types, and signs of conflict. You will learn about negotiation and mediation, conflict resolution strategies, and how conflict can lead to violence. Toward the end of the unit you will explore different kinds of abuse and ways of seeking help if you are being abused.

Tobacco

In this unit, you will learn about tobacco and they dangerous effects it has on the body. You will understand the influences on teens to try tobacco and the how to gather reliable information on teens and tobacco use. In the last lesson of this unit, you will learn about ways to say no to tobacco, how to quit smoking if you are addicted, and the rights of nonsmokers.

Alcohol

In this unit, you will learn about alcohol and the dangerous effects it has. You will learn about why teens use alcohol and ways to help a friend avoid alcohol. You will find out what to do if you need help with alcohol and how to say no.

Drugs

In this unit, you will learn all about drugs and the risks associated with drug abuse. You will find out the effects of different drugs on the body and why you should avoid drug use. You will also look at reasons to stay drug free and alternatives to drug use.

CD/DVD

  • Elementary Yoga DVD (set of 2)

Course Sets

  • Health and Physical Education (7)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Get Fit Handbook

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Glencoe Teen Health: Course 2

Supplies

  • Jump rope

Art 7

Description:
The seventh grade Art course focuses on the visual arts as a form of personal expression. Students explore the basics of art, including the methods and themes of expression. This course has strong ties to social studies and a strong emphasis on drawing and painting techniques.

Units:

Warm Up: The Art Basics

You will warm up your skills in Unit 1 by reviewing basic drawing skills, the elements and principles of art, and ways in which to judge and critique an artwork. You will have the opportunity to design, draw, and paint in this unit.

Methods of Visual Expression

In Unit 2 you will learn a variety of methods to create compositions and meaning in your artwork. Topics include: combining the art elements, using signs, symbols and text, the functions of images, and figure drawing. You will have the opportunity to draw, paint, design, and collage.

Using Your Voice: Themes and Meaning

Unit 3 allows you to develop your own content and meaning in self-inspired artworks. Each lesson in this unit asks you to express a specific dimension or characteristic of your identity or opinion. Some of these dimensions are emotions, family, cultural heritage, and personal opinions. You will have the opportunity to sculpt, draw, paint, design, write, and tell a story, and complete interactive activities.

Course Sets

  • Art (7)

Kit

  • Art 7 / TX Art Appreciation Kit

Supplies

  • Beginner Sketch Set
  • Drawing pad
  • Paint, acrylic (set of 6 colors)
  • Paintbrushes, acrylic (4)

Textbook

  • Glencoe Exploring Art †

Gifted and Talented Language Arts 7 A

Description:
In Gifted and Talented Language Arts 7 A, the student will work at an accelerated pace while engaging in more complex and challenging instructional activities. Each unit focuses on a central question; and the student will read, analyze, and interpret a variety of literature that informs his perspective about questions such as the following: “How can we become who we want to be?”, “Who can we really count on?”, and “Who influences us and how do they do so?”.

The student will develop his reading skills and expand his vocabulary while reading across the genres of nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and drama. He will also select literature for independent reading and choose either The Watsons Go to Birmingham–1963 or The Liberation of Gabriel King as his novel unit. The student will strengthen his mastery of the writing process and the six traits of writing as he composes personal, creative, and persuasive writing.

Units:

Why Do We Read?

In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: Why do we read? You will consider different aspects of why you read and why other people read. You will learn how to read informational media by using skills such as setting a purpose, previewing, summarizing, and reviewing what you have read. You will examine the text features and structure of newspaper and magazine articles, as well as read short stories, poems, and an excerpt from an autobiography. You will distinguish between action and linking verbs, and learn ways to use context clues to help you understand unknown words.

How Can We Become Who We Want to Be?

In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: How can we become who we want to be? You will consider different aspects of what makes people who they are and see how other people have worked to become who they want to be. You will learn about literary elements and examine how they influence the story. You will apply strategies such as connecting and inferring as you read biographies and autobiographies. You will learn how to use context to understand multiple-meaning words. You will also study nouns and pronouns.

The Watsons Go to Birmingham—1963

The novel, The Watsons Go to Birmingham—1963, tells the story of the “Weird Watson” family and the humorous events that occur to them in Flint, Michigan, in 1963. After one too many “adventures” by their oldest son, Byron, the parents decide to take a family trip to Birmingham, Alabama, to visit the children’s grandmother and hopefully encourage Byron to change his ways. On their way to Alabama and while there, the Watson children learn that life is different for African Americans in the South. You will identify literary elements and write an essay about an American hero.

The Watsons go to Birmingham—1963 is the recommended novel for Language Arts 7A. The Liberation of Gabriel King may be read instead of The Watsons go to Birmingham—1963 with prior teacher approval. Lessons and activities for The Liberation of Gabriel King will appear on the lower half of the lesson pages.The Liberation of Gabriel King is a historical novel about a young boy living in America in 1976. Gabriel King worries about a lot of things, and his best friend, Frita, sets out to help him overcome his fears. Her plan doesn’t always go the way she hoped, however, and she and Gabriel will both learn important lessons as they try to figure out what it means to be courageous. You will identify literary elements, analyze themes, and create an essay about an American hero.

Who Can We Really Count On?

In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: Who can we really count on? You will think about how the characters in the selections would answer that question, and consider how you would answer it for yourself. You will apply skills such as drawing conclusions, responding, synthesizing, and determining the main idea as you read short stories. You will learn about adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, and interjections. You will examine the key literary elements and understand synonyms and antonyms.

Who Influences Us and How Do They Do So?

In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: Who influences us and how do they do so? You will learn about the persuasive arguments that influence people and analyze ways in which these factors change people’s lives. You will learn how persuasive writing influences readers. You will learn how to distinguish between fact and opinion, and identify the author’s purpose and perspective. You will examine how style, tone, diction, and word choice strengthen arguments and influence the reader. You will also identify types of sentences.

Course Sets

  • GT Language Arts (7)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Gifted Language Arts 7 A and B Course Guide

Novel

  • Dragonwings
  • The Watsons Go to Birmingham

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Glencoe Literature: Course 2

Gifted and Talented Language Arts 7 B

Description:
In Gifted and Talented Language Arts 7 B, the student will continue to work at an accelerated pace while engaging in more complex and challenging instructional activities. As he reads, analyzes, and interprets a variety of literature, the student will ponder answers to central questions such as following: “Is progress always good?”, “Why do we share our stories?”, and “What is a community?”.

The students will further develop his reading skills and expand his vocabulary while reading across the genres of nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and drama. He will also select literature for independent reading and choose either Dragonwings or Where the Mountain Meets the Moon as his novel unit. The student will strengthen his mastery of the writing process and the six traits of writing as he composes creative, descriptive, and research writing.

Units:

Is Progress Always Good?

In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: Is progress always good? You will consider different aspects of progress and how progress affects you, your family, your community, and the world. You will apply the key reading skills for understanding science and technology writing—paraphrasing and summarizing, using text features, and taking notes. You will analyze word structure by identifying base words, suffixes, and prefixes. You will distinguish between main and subordinate clauses and learn how to use the correct punctuation.

Dragonwings

This Newbery Award-winning novel takes place in the San Francisco Bay Area at the turn of the century. It is the story of a Chinese boy, Moon Shadow, who moves to Chinatown to be with his father, Windrider, who is working on a flying machine at the same time as the Wright Brothers are. An historical novel, it depicts not only the lives of and discrimination against San Francisco’s Chinese immigrants in the early 1900s, but also the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. You will identify literary elements and write a newspaper article describing a major event in the novel.

Dragonwings is the recommended novel for Language Arts 7B. Where the Mountain Meets the Moon may be read instead of Dragonwings with prior teacher approval. Lessons and activities for Where the Mountain Meets the Moon will appear on the lower half of the lesson pages.Where the Mountain Meets the Moon is a fantasy novel about a girl named Minli and her quest to help her family. The story also follows Minli’s parents as they try to make a good life and a good home for Minli. The events of the novel take place in China long ago, in a world where magic is real. Fantastic creatures and impossible events form the background for a story about family, fortune, and friendship.

Why Do We Share Our Stories?

In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: Why do we share our stories? You will consider different reasons for storytelling and learn how storytelling has helped connect generations throughout time. You will learn how to understand cause and effect, and use reading skills such as questioning, predicting, and analyzing. You will analyze the literary elements of folktales: theme, characterization, cultural allusions, and dialect. You will learn to distinguish between compound and complex sentences.

What Makes You Tick?

In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: What makes you tick? You will consider different aspects of who you are and examine the things that inspire you. You will learn how to read poetry by using skills such as evaluating, interpreting, connecting, and monitoring comprehension. You will examine sound devices, figurative language, symbolism, and rhythm in a variety of poems. You will also study word origins and learn how to ensure correct subject and verb agreement.

What Is a Community?

In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: What is a community? You will read selections that allow you to visit communities in different places as well as in different times. You will consider how people and communities shape each other. You will learn how to read historical documents by using skills such as visualizing, skimming and scanning, clarifying, and predicting. You will examine descriptive writing by identifying imagery, figurative language, and how the text is organized. You will learn the correct way to use punctuation and identify compound words.

Course Sets

  • GT Language Arts (7)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Gifted Language Arts 7 A and B Course Guide

Novel

  • Dragonwings
  • The Watsons Go to Birmingham

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Glencoe Literature: Course 2

Gifted and Talented Literature Study 7

Description:
The Junior Great Books® program employs the method of interpretive readings and discussion being known as the Shared Inquiry™ method. This distinctive approach to learning enables leaders—the teachers and Learning Coaches—to foster a vibrant environment in which a student acquires the habits and strategies of a self-reliant thinker, reader, and learner. Through their own curiosity and attentive questioning, leaders serve as partners in inquiry with the student, helping him work with other students to discover meaning in a reading selection and to build interpretations. The process reaches its fullest expression in Shared Inquiry discussion, where leaders and students think and talk about an interpretive question that arises from a particular story. Using LiveLesson® sessions, the student will interact with peers twice during each unit for Shared Inquiry and presentation of personal writing. The Junior Great Books program includes outstanding works of literature by award-winning authors. Praised for their rich language and international range, and chosen carefully for their ability to support multiple interpretations, the stories in Junior Great Books capture students’ attention and imagination and engage the best of their thinking. Progressing in reading level, conceptual complexity, and length throughout the series, the stories are the foundation for a thoughtful process of reading, discussion, and writing.

Units:

Harrison Bergeron

In this unit, you will read “Harrison Bergeron.” You will be introduced to The Reader Writes Activity Book, which will help you write about what you are reading. You will also practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, you will share your notes in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, you will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. You will share your writing with your teacher and your class during another LiveLesson session at the end of the unit.

I Just Kept on Smiling

In this unit, you will read “I Just Kept on Smiling.” You will strengthen your writing skills with an activity in The Reader Writes Activity Book. You will also practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, you will share your notes in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, you will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. You will share your writing with your teacher and your class during another LiveLesson session at the end of the unit.

At Her Father’s and Her Mother’s Place

In this unit, you will read “At Her Father’s and Her Mother’s Place.” You will strengthen your writing skills with an activity in The Reader Writes Activity Book. You will also practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, you will share your notes in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, you will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. You will share your writing with your teacher and your class during another LiveLesson session at the end of the unit.

The White Circle

In this unit, you will read “The White Circle.” You will strengthen your writing skills with an activity in The Reader Writes Activity Book. You will also practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, you will share your notes in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, you will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. You will share your writing with your teacher and your class during another LiveLesson session at the end of the unit.

The Zodiacs

In this unit, you will read “The Zodiacs.” You will strengthen your writing skills with an activity in The Reader Writes Activity Book. You will also practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, you will share your notes in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, you will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. You will share your writing with your teacher and your class during another LiveLesson session at the end of the unit.

End of the Game

In this unit, you will read “End of the Game.” You will strengthen your writing skills with an activity in The Reader Writes Activity Book. You will also practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, you will share your notes in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, you will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. You will share your writing with your teacher and your class during another LiveLesson session at the end of the unit.

The Cat and the Coffee Drinkers

In this unit, you will read “The Cat and the Coffee Drinkers.” You will strengthen your writing skills with an activity in The Reader Writes Activity Book. You will also practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, you will share your notes in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, you will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. You will share your writing with your teacher and your class during another LiveLesson session at the end of the unit.

The Diary of a Young Girl

In this unit, you will read “The Diary of a Young Girl.” You will strengthen your writing skills with an activity in The Reader Writes Activity Book. You will also practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, you will share your notes in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, you will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. You will share your writing with your teacher and your class during another LiveLesson session at the end of the unit.

The Secret Lion

In this unit, you will read “The Secret Lion.” You will strengthen your writing skills with an activity from The Reader Writes Activity Book. You will also practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, you will share your notes in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, you will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. You will share your writing with your teacher and your class during another LiveLesson session at the end of the unit.

Day of the Butterfly

In this unit, you will read “Day of the Butterfly.” You will strengthen your writing skills with an activity in The Reader Writes Activity Book. You will also practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, you will share your notes in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, you will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. You will share your writing with your teacher and your class during another LiveLesson session at the end of the unit.

A Christmas Carol (Staves 1–2)

In this unit, you will read “A Christmas Carol” (Staves 1–2). You will strengthen your writing skills with an activity in The Reader Writes Activity Book. You will also practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, you will share your notes in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, you will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. You will share your writing with your teacher and your class during another LiveLesson session at the end of the unit.

A Christmas Carol (Staves 3–5)

In this unit, you will read “A Christmas Carol” (Staves 3–5). You will strengthen your writing skills with an activity in The Reader Writes Activity Book. You will also practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, you will share your notes in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, you will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. You will share your writing with your teacher and your class during another LiveLesson session at the end of the unit.

Course Sets

  • GT Literature Study 7

Textbook

  • JGB Series 7 Anthology Book One

Workbook

  • JGB The Reader Writes

Language Arts 7 A

Description:
In Language Arts 7A, each unit focuses on a central question; the student will read, analyze, and interpret a variety of literature that informs his perspective about questions such as: How can I become who I want to be?, Who can I really count on?, and Who influences me and how do they do so? The student will develop his reading skills and expand his vocabulary while reading across the genres of nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and drama. The student will also self select literature for independent reading and choose either The Watsons Go to Birmingham–1963 or The Liberation of Gabriel King as his novel unit. The student will strengthen his mastery of the writing process and the six traits of writing as he composes personal, creative, and persuasive writing.

Units:

Why Do We Read?

In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: Why do we read? You will consider different aspects of why you read and why other people read. You will learn how to read informational media by using skills such as setting a purpose, previewing, summarizing, and reviewing what you have read. You will examine the text features and structure of newspaper and magazine articles, as well as read short stories, poems, and an excerpt from an autobiography. You will distinguish between action and linking verbs, and learn ways to use context clues to help you understand unknown words.

How Can We Become Who We Want to Be?

In this unit, you will explore the following Big Question: How can we become who we want to be? You will consider different aspects of what makes people who they are and see how other people have worked to become who they want to be. You will learn about literary elements and examine how they influence the story. You will apply strategies such as connecting and inferring as you read biographies and autobiographies. You will compose and submit your own personal narrative. You will learn how to use context to understand multiple-meaning words. You will also study nouns and pronouns.

The Watsons Go to Birmingham—1963

This novel tells the story of the “Weird Watson” family and the humorous events that occur to them in Flint, Michigan, in 1963. After one too many “adventures” by their oldest son, Byron, the parents decide to take a family trip to Birmingham, Alabama, to visit the children’s grandmother and hopefully encourage Byron to change his ways. On their way to Alabama, and while there, the Watson children learn that life is different for African Americans in the South. You will identify literary elements and write an essay about an American hero.

The Watsons go to Birmingham—1963 is the recommended novel for Language Arts 7A. The Liberation of Gabriel King may be read instead of The Watsons go to Birmingham—1963 with prior teacher approval. Lessons and activities for The Liberation of Gabriel King will appear on the lower half of the lesson pages.The Liberation of Gabriel King is a historical novel about a young boy living in America in 1976. Gabriel King worries about a lot of things, and his best friend, Frita, sets out to help him overcome his fears. Her plan doesn’t always go the way she hoped, however, and she and Gabriel will both learn important lessons as they try to figure out what it means to be courageous. You will identify literary elements, analyze themes, and create an essay about an American hero.

Who Can We Really Count On?

In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: Who can we really count on? You will think about how the characters in the selections would answer the big question, and consider how you would answer it for yourself. You will apply skills such as drawing conclusions, responding, synthesizing, and determining the main idea as you read short stories. You will learn about adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, and interjections. You will examine the key literary elements and understand synonyms and antonyms.In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: Who can we really count on? You will think about how the characters in the selections would answer the big question, and consider how you would answer it for yourself. You will apply skills such as drawing conclusions, responding, synthesizing, and determining the main idea as you read short stories. You will learn about adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, and interjections. You will examine the key literary elements and understand synonyms and antonyms.

Who Influences Us and How Do They Do So?

In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: Who influences us and how do they do so? You will learn about the persuasive arguments that influence people and analyze ways in which these arguments change people’s lives. You will learn how persuasive writing influences readers. You will learn how to distinguish between fact and opinion, and how to identify the author’s purpose and perspective. You will examine how style, tone, diction, and word choice strengthen arguments and influence the reader. You will also identify types of sentences.

Course Sets

  • Language Arts (7)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Language Arts 7 A and B Course Guide

Novel

  • Dragonwings
  • The Watsons Go to Birmingham

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Glencoe Literature: Course 2

Language Arts 7 B

Description:
In Language Arts 7B, the student will continue to explore central questions in each unit. As the student reads, analyzes, and interprets a variety of literature, he will ponder answers to questions such as: Is progress always good?, Why do people share their stories?, and What is a community? The student will further develop his reading skills and expand his vocabulary while reading across the genres of nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and drama. The student will also self select literature for independent reading and choose either Dragonwings or Where the Mountain Meets the Moon as his novel unit. The student will strengthen his mastery of the writing process and the six traits of writing as he composes creative, descriptive, and research writing.

Units:

Is Progress Always Good?

In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: Is progress always good? You will consider different aspects of progress and how progress affects you, your family, your community, and the world. You will apply the key reading skills for understanding science and technology writing—paraphrasing and summarizing, using text features, and taking notes. You will analyze word structure by identifying base words, suffixes, and prefixes. You will distinguish between main and subordinate clauses and learn how to use the correct punctuation.

Dragonwings

This Newbery Award-winning novel takes place in the San Francisco Bay Area at the turn of the century. It is the story of a Chinese boy, Moon Shadow, who moves to Chinatown to be with his father, Windrider, who is working on a flying machine at the same time the Wright Brothers are. An historical novel, it depicts not only the lives of and discrimination against San Francisco’s Chinese immigrants in the early 1900s, but also the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. You will identify literary elements and write a newspaper article describing a major event in the novel.

Dragonwings is the recommended novel for Language Arts 7B. Where the Mountain Meets the Moon may be read instead of Dragonwings with prior teacher approval. Lessons and activities for Where the Mountain Meets the Moon will appear on the lower half of the lesson pages.Where the Mountain Meets the Moon is a fantasy novel about a girl named Minli and her quest to help her family. The story also follows Minli’s parents as they try to make a good life and a good home for Minli. The events of the novel take place in China long ago, in a world where magic is real. Fantastic creatures and impossible events form the background for a story about family, fortune, and friendship.

Why Do We Share Our Stories?

In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: Why do we share our stories? You will consider different reasons for storytelling and learn how storytelling has helped connect generations throughout time. You will learn how to understand cause and effect, and use reading skills such as questioning, predicting, and analyzing. You will analyze the literary elements of folktales: theme, characterization, cultural allusions, and dialect. You will learn to distinguish between compound and complex sentences.

What Makes You Tick?

In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: What makes you tick? You will consider different aspects of who you are and examine the things that inspire you. You will learn how to read poetry by using skills such as evaluating, interpreting, connecting, and monitoring comprehension. You will examine sound devices, figurative language, symbolism, and rhythm in a variety of poems. You will also study word origins and learn how to ensure correct subject and verb agreement.

What Is a Community?

In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: What is a community? You will read selections that allow you to visit communities in different places as well as in different times. You will consider how people and communities shape each other. You will learn how to read historical documents by using skills such as visualizing, skimming and scanning, clarifying, and predicting. You will examine descriptive writing by identifying imagery, figurative language, and how the text is organized. You will learn the correct way to use punctuation and identify compound words.

Course Sets

  • Language Arts (7)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Language Arts 7 A and B Course Guide

Novel

  • Dragonwings
  • The Watsons Go to Birmingham

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Glencoe Literature: Course 2

Gifted and Talented Math 7 (Algebra 1) A

Description:
Gifted math students begin this course in middle school to provide opportunity for advanced study in high school.

This course is the first of two that comprise Algebra 1. In this course the student will gain a foundational understanding of the real number system, expressions, equations, and inequalities. The student will be taught to solve simple and multi-step equations and inequalities, and to represent those solutions graphically. In addition, students will be taught about functions that are either linear or nonlinear in nature, and represent those functions on the coordinate plane. Finally, the student will solve systems of equations and inequalities and represent those solutions graphically.

Throughout the course problem solving, critical thinking, and real world application of mathematical concepts will be required.

Units:

Foundations for Algebra

In this unit, you will be provided with a general introduction to Algebra 1 by reviewing many concepts from previous math courses including variables, expressions, and real-number operations. This unit provides you with a solid foundation for the remainder of Algebra 1. You will complete a unit portfolio project in which you will apply your knowledge of using variables to represent unknown and variable quantities, and writing expressions and equations.

Solving Equations

In this unit, you will learn how to solve problems using a variety of problem-solving strategies including tables, graphs, and equations. This unit also includes instruction on solving one, two, or multi-step equations, a skill that is essential to your learning of higher-level mathematics. You will complete a variety of assessments in this unit, including Quick Checks, quizzes, and a unit test.

Solving Inequalities

In this unit, you will learn how to solve inequalities that require one or more steps. You will also learn how to graph the solutions to inequalities on the number line. Set notation will be introduced as a tool for expressing the solutions to inequalities. Finally, you will explore absolute value equations and inequalities and the union and intersection of sets.

Introduction to Functions

In this unit, you will explore functions and their applications. You will be introduced to the characteristics of a function and learn to compare linear and nonlinear functions. You will also graph functions on the coordinate plane and write functions given their graph. Functions are an important part of algebra because they lay a foundation for understanding higher-level mathematics problems that depend on your understanding of the characteristics of functions.

Linear Functions

In this unit, you will learn how to use several types of linear equations, including slope-intercept, point-slope, and standard forms. You will use slope to compare parallel and perpendicular lines and explore relationships between these types of lines. You will also graph and translate absolute value functions on the coordinate plane.

Systems of Equations and Inequalities

In this unit, you will apply what you know about linear equations and inequalities to systems of linear equations or inequalities. You will solve systems of linear equations by graphing, substitution, or elimination. You will also be introduced to the topic of matrices and use them to solve systems of equations. You will graph linear inequalities and solve systems of two linear equalities. Finally, you will apply these topics to solve real-world scenarios.

Gifted and Talented Math 7 A Semester Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the semester exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you be successful with both objective and essay questions.

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Algebra 1: On Level

Textbook

  • Algebra 1: On Level †

Gifted and Talented Math 7 (Algebra 1) B

Description:
Gifted math students begin this course in middle school to provide opportunity for advanced study in high school.

This is course is the second part of a two-part sequence covering Algebra 1. A foundational understanding of real number operations, expressions, equations, inequalities, and functions is expected. This course will introduce the student to exponents and use those exponent rules to solve exponential functions. The student will learn how to identify and solve polynomial equations using a variety of methods including factoring. The student will also learn how to work with quadratic functions and equations and represent both of those on a coordinate plane. Students will work with and solve both radical and rational expressions and equations. Finally, the student will be introduced to statistics and learn to how use data to apply to probability problems in theory in and real-world scenarios.

Throughout the course problem solving, critical thinking, and real world application of mathematical concepts will be required.

Units:

Exponents and Exponential Functions

In this unit, you will learn about expressions involving exponents in several forms. You will learn about zero and negative exponents and use what you know about exponents to solve problems using standard and scientific notation. You will learn and apply the rules for multiplication and division of expressions involving exponents. Finally, you will evaluate exponential functions and use exponential functions to solve real world problems of exponential growth and decay.

Polynomials and Factoring

In this unit, you will learn how to classify, add, and subtract polynomials. You will also learn to multiply polynomials and monomials, and how to factor polynomials using GCF. You will then find the squares of a binomial, the sum and difference of squares, the product of a sum and difference, and you will factor higher-degree polynomials.

Quadratic Functions and Equations

In this unit, you will learn how to work with quadratic functions and quadratic equations. You will learn to graph functions in several forms and solve both quadratic equations and quadratic functions. You will also learn to choose between different models to display data, and finally, you will solve systems of linear and quadratic equations. These topics will be important foundational skills for your study of higher level mathematics.

Radical Expressions and Equations

In this unit you will work with radicals applied to many different types of problems. To begin, you will work with the Pythagorean Theorem and right triangles, using radicals in your solutions to those problems. Then you will learn to simplify and rationalize radicals, followed by solving problems using radicals in expressions and equations. You will learn to identify extraneous solutions to radical equations and graph their solutions. Finally, you will find and use trigonometric ratios and apply what you have learned to real-world scenarios.

Rational Expressions and Functions

In this unit you will work with rational expressions and equations. To begin, you will learn to simplify rational expressions. Then, you will learn to multiply and divide rational expressions and polynomials. You will also learn to simplify complex fractions. You will learn to define inverse variations and compare direct and inverse variations, as well as graphing rational functions.

Data Analysis and Probability

In this unit, you will explore data analysis and probability. To begin, you will organize data in a matrix form and learn to add, subtract, and perform scalar multiplication using matrices. You will work with various graphic representations of data including tables, histograms, box-and-whisker plots, and line graphs. Using data, you will explore measures of central tendency including mean, median, mode, and range. Finally, you will work with permutations, combinations, and independent and dependent events.

Gifted and Talented Math 7 B Review and Exam

This unit reviews concepts from Semester B of the Algebra 1 course. The unit begins with a review assignment which intends to help the student recall topics from Units 1 – 6. You will also spend time utilizing the one page review guides created at the end of each unit. These review guides contain key vocabulary, points to remember, and sample problems that you can rework. Practice opportunities from the textbook are included. The assessment is included at the conclusion of the unit in the form of the semester exam.

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Algebra 1: On Level

Textbook

  • Algebra 1: On Level †

Math 7 A

Description:
In this course, the student will use the four operations with decimals, fractions, and integers to solve equations and inequalities. The student will simplify expressions with exponents and rational numbers. In the study of number theory, the student will further strengthen his skills as he solves problems involving factors and multiples by using divisibility tests and prime factorization. The student will apply ratios, rates, proportions, and scale drawings to solve various problems and then solve percent problems, including percent of change and commission.

Units:

Decimals and Integers

In this unit, you will learn to add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals. You will learn how to align decimals to find sums and differences and how to properly place decimal points in products and quotients. You will apply properties of addition and multiplication as tools for solving problems using mental math. You will perform basic operations using a set of numbers called integers, which includes both positive and negative numbers. You will also learn how to represent a large set of numbers with just one number, called a measure of central tendency (such as mean, median, or mode). Finally, you will practice constructing and interpreting box-and-whisker plots to analyze distribution of data.

Exponents, Factors, and Fractions

In this unit, you will begin working with exponents and learning how to simplify expressions using the order of operations. You will work with fractions of all sorts— both proper and improper—as well as mixed numbers. You will learn how to compare and order fractions and how to write them in simplest form. You will also discover rules and shortcuts for converting fractions to decimals and decimals to fractions.

Operations with Fractions

Equations and Inequalities

Ratios, Rates, and Proportions

A ratio is a comparison of two things. A proportion is an equation stating that two ratios are equivalent to each other. In this unit, you will use ratios and proportions to find unknown quantities. At the end of the unit, you will complete a portfolio project where you will take measurements and make a map of your kitchen.

Percents

This unit will focus on percents. People use percents often in everyday life, from calculating the score on a test to the finding the sale price of a shirt. At the end of this unit, you’ll be able to use percents to solve real-world problems. The portfolio assessment for this unit will be a project in which you will calculate the after-tax sale price of items you find online.

Math 7 B

Description:
In this course, the student will explore concepts in geometry including identifying and describing the properties of geometric figures, as well as the relationships that exist between them. The student will find perimeter, area, and volume of two-dimensional figures and extend measurement skills to determine surface area and volume of three-dimensional figures. Next, the student will use tables, graphs, formulas, and functions to identify and extend number patterns. The student will graph linear and nonlinear relationships, identify slope, and explore translations. In the study of statistics, the student will create, analyze, and interpret different data displays. At the end of the course, the student will study probability and explore dependent events, compound events, and combinations.

Units:

Geometry

In this unit, you will work with basic geometric ideas. You will learn how to classify angles, triangles, and polygons and identify the parts of a circle. Lastly, you will construct different types of geometric figures.

Measurement

This unit will take some of the basic ideas you learned in the previous unit and put them to work. In this unit, you will be calculating perimeter, area, surface area, and volume of figures. In addition, you will be introduced to the Pythagorean Theorem and to irrational numbers. You will demonstrate what you learned in this unit with a portfolio project at the end where you will calculate the surface area and volume of common household items.

Patterns and Rules

This unit will review patterns and lay the foundation for your future study with functions. By the end of this unit, you will be able to create and interpret graphs and calculate interest on an amount of money.

Graphing in the Coordinate Plane

The functions that you learned about previously can be graphed on a coordinate plane. In this unit, you will learn to graph points and lines. You will also find lines of symmetry and graph reflections, translations, and rotations.

Displaying and Analyzing Data

In this unit, you will be working with sets of data and displaying them in a way that they can be quickly and easily understood. By the end, you’ll be able to distinguish a valid survey from an invalid one, and identify graphical representations that are misleading.

Using Probability

The probability of an event is the likelihood that the event will occur. In this unit, you will be calculating the probabilities of given events including events that are dependent on another event occurring first. You will also determine how many possible outcomes there are for a given set of circumstances.

Gifted and Talented Science 7 A

Description:
Science for seventh graders is an integrated approach with opportunities for students to explore concepts in earth science, life science, and physical science. Students learn lab report processes and protocols, and these skills are utilized throughout the course. Earth science investigates the properties of rocks and minerals, patterns in the atmosphere, and the solar system. Students describe the structures of living things, explore how living things interact, and learn about various human body systems in the life science unit. Physical science covers physical and chemical properties of matter, different types of forces and motion, and various forms of energy.

Units:

The Nature of Science

Whether you are trying to identify the duck that is the fastest swimmer on the pond or tasting your iced tea to determine whether it is sweet enough, you are acting like a scientist. Scientists spend much of their time observing and investigating the world around them.

In this introductory unit, you will explore the nature of science, learn how to set up and perform a scientific experiment, and explore how to organize and display data-activities you will repeat throughout the course. In addition, you will explore the relationship between science and technology and analyze how technology influences your everyday life.

Earth’s Materials

Many different substances form within Earth. Gravel used to build roads and rare diamonds used to make jewelry both originate below Earth’s surface. In this unit, you will learn more about Earth’s materials as you describe the characteristics and composition of various rocks and minerals, identify rocks and minerals, compare different types of rocks, and analyze the rock cycle.

Earth’s Atmosphere and Beyond

What causes the wind to blow? How is the sun able to heat Earth from such a great distance? Why are the climates of certain regions of Earth so different from others? In this unit, you will discover the answers to these questions as you explore the characteristics of Earth’s atmosphere, interpret weather patterns, explain and compare various climate types, and analyze how substances that are fundamental to organisms cycle through Earth’s atmosphere.

In addition, you will examine Earth as part of the solar system. In the later lessons of this unit, you will identify the effects of Earth’s motions, explore the characteristics and movements of Earth’s moon, and describe and compare the characteristics of the planets in our solar system.

The Basis of Life: Part 1

How would life on Earth change if all organisms looked the same, behaved in the same manner, and changed at the same rate? On the other hand, what if there were no similarities among living things? In this unit, you will explore the branch of science called biology, which is the study of the unity and diversity of life. Throughout the unit, you will describe the structure and organization of living things from cells to organ systems, compare and classify living things, and analyze plant and animal reproduction.

The Basis of Life: Part 2

What determines whether or not you have dimples? Why are you probably much larger than your ancestors were when they were your age? What is genetics, and how does it affect your life? In this unit, you will examine factors that shape how you look and how your body functions. More specifically, you will study genetics and heredity, assess the affects of genetic advancements, and examine the theory of evolution.

Course Sets

  • GT Science (7)

Kit

  • Science 7 Kit

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Gifted and Talented Science 7 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Glencoe Science: Level Green

Supplies

  • Goggles, safety
  • Thermometers (2)

Gifted and Talented Science 7 B

Description:
Science for seventh graders is an integrated approach with opportunities for students to explore concepts in earth science, life science, and physical science. Students learn lab report processes and protocols, and these skills are utilized throughout the course. Earth science investigates the properties of rocks and minerals, patterns in the atmosphere, and the solar system. Students describe the structures of living things, explore how living things interact, and learn about various human body systems in the life science unit. Physical science covers physical and chemical properties of matter, different types of forces and motion, and various forms of energy.

Units:

Human Body Systems: Part 1

How did the fruit and cereal that you ate for breakfast become energy that you use to complete your schoolwork? Why do you feel sleepy shortly after eating cookies or other sugary snacks? In this unit, you will identify the organs of the digestive system and their functions as well as describe the importance of different types of nutrients. In addition, you will explore the functions of the structures of the respiratory and excretory systems.

Human Body Systems: Part 2

Skin, which is the body’s largest organ, is the barrier between your physical interior and the world around you. Although it may appear to be inactive, a lot is happening on and within the skin. In this unit, you will investigate the functions of the skin as well as explore some systems that it contains, such as the muscular, skeletal, nervous, reproductive, and endocrine systems. Specifically, you will analyze how the skin protects the body, compare different types of muscles, describe functions of the skeletal system, explain how different factors may affect the nervous system, identify the hormones that different endocrine glands produce, and compare the major structures of the male and female reproductive systems.

The Interdependence of Life

You probably already know that plants and water are vital to the existence of living things. However, you may not be aware that bacteria within the soil play a key role in sustaining organisms as well. In this unit, you will analyze interactions between living and nonliving things and among organisms as you describe and compare the characteristics of different types of plants, explore how energy flows through ecosystems, and investigate how nonliving factors affect plants. In addition, you will learn what you can do to help protect the sometimes delicate relationships that exist in nature.

Matter and Energy: Part 1

Most pond organisms would not be able to survive the winter if a layer of ice did not form on the surface of the pond. Many species of plants would not prosper if soil was not able absorb certain nutrients. The special properties of water and soil are vital to the existence of these organisms. In this unit, you will explore the properties of several different types of matter as you identify and compare chemical and physical changes, describe different types of solutions, investigate the unique characteristics of water, analyze acids and bases, describe changes of states of matter, and explain the behavior of fluids.

Matter and Energy: Part 2

Energy is all around you and is required for all that you do. Much of your life is about getting from point A to point B. Some journeys, such as the trek from your bedroom to the bathroom, expend a relatively small amount of energy, while others, such as the drive from your home to a family vacation spot, require a greater amount of energy. In this unit, you will learn about motion, energy, and the relationships between the two as you describe and compare Newton’s laws of motion, distinguish among different types of energy, apply the law of conservation of energy, compare renewable, nonrenewable, and alternative energy sources, and explore how you use energy.

Course Sets

  • GT Science (7)

Kit

  • Science 7 Kit

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Gifted and Talented Science 7 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Glencoe Science: Level Green

Supplies

  • Goggles, safety
  • Thermometers (2)

Science 7 A

Description:
Science for seventh graders is an integrated approach with opportunities for students to explore concepts in earth science, life science, and physical science. Students learn lab report processes and protocols, and these skills are utilized throughout the course. Earth science investigates the properties of rocks and minerals, patterns in the atmosphere, and the solar system. Students describe the structures of living things, explore how living things interact, and learn about various human body systems in the life science unit. Physical science covers physical and chemical properties of matter, different types of forces and motion, and various forms of energy.

Units:

The Nature of Science

Whether you are trying to identify the duck that is the fastest swimmer on the pond or tasting your iced tea to determine whether it is sweet enough, you are acting like a scientist. Scientists spend much of their time observing and investigating the world around them.

In this introductory unit, you will explore the nature of science, learn how to set up and perform a scientific experiment, and explore how to organize and display data-activities you will repeat throughout the course. In addition, you will explore the relationship between science and technology.

Earth’s Materials

Many different substances form within Earth. The gravel used to build roads and the rare diamonds used to make jewelry both originate below Earth’s surface. In this unit, you will learn more about Earth’s materials as you describe the characteristics and composition of various rocks and minerals, identify rocks and minerals, compare different types of rocks, and analyze the rock cycle.

Earth’s Atmosphere and Beyond

What causes the wind to blow? How is the sun able to heat Earth from such a great distance? Why are the climates of certain regions of Earth so different from others? In this unit, you will discover the answers to these questions as you explore the characteristics of Earth’s atmosphere, interpret weather patterns, explain and compare various climate types, and analyze how substances that are fundamental to organisms cycle through Earth’s atmosphere.

In addition, you will examine Earth as part of the solar system. In the later lessons of this unit, you will identify the effects of Earth’s motions, explore the characteristics and movements of Earth’s moon, and describe and compare the characteristics of the planets in our solar system.

The Basis of Life: Part 1

How would life on Earth change if all organisms looked the same, behaved in the same manner, and changed at the same rate? What if there were no similarities among living things? Imagine if all life on Earth had completely different features from one another. In this unit, you will explore the branch of science called biology. Biology is the study of living organisms, including their interactions with one another and with their environment. Throughout this unit, you will describe the structure and organization of living things from cells to organ systems, compare and classify living things, and analyze plant and animal reproduction.

The Basis of Life: Part 2

What determines whether or not you have dimples? Why can you roll your tongue but your friend cannot? Why are you probably much larger than your ancestors were when they were your age? In this unit, you will examine factors that shape how you look and how your body functions. More specifically, you will study genetics and heredity (the science and study of inheritance), assess the effects of genetic advancements, and examine the theory of evolution.

Course Sets

  • GT Science (7)

Kit

  • Science 7 Kit

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Gifted and Talented Science 7 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Glencoe Science: Level Green

Supplies

  • Goggles, safety
  • Thermometers (2)

Science 7 B

Description:
Science for seventh graders is an integrated approach with opportunities for students to explore concepts in earth science, life science, and physical science. Students learn lab report processes and protocols, and these skills are utilized throughout the course. Earth science investigates the properties of rocks and minerals, patterns in the atmosphere, and the solar system. Students describe the structures of living things, explore how living things interact, and learn about various human body systems in the life science unit. Physical science covers physical and chemical properties of matter, different types of forces and motion, and various forms of energy.

Units:

Human Body Systems: Part 1

How did the fruit and cereal that you ate for breakfast become energy that you use to complete your schoolwork? Why do you feel sleepy shortly after eating cookies or other sugary snacks? In this unit, you will identify the organs of the digestive system and their functions as well as describe the importance of different types of nutrients. In addition, you will explore the functions of the structures of the respiratory and excretory systems.

Human Body Systems: Part 2

Skin is an organ and a physical barrier between your internal environment and the world around you. It is the largest organ in the body, with a surface area of approximately two square meters. As an organ, the skin plays an essential role in controlling body temperature and protecting the inside of the body from infectious diseases.Although it may appear to be inactive, a lot is happening on and within the skin. In this unit, you will investigate the functions of the skin as well as explore some systems that it contains, such as the muscular, skeletal, nervous, reproductive, and endocrine systems. Specifically, you will analyze how the skin protects the body, compare different types of muscles, describe functions of the skeletal system, explain how different factors may affect the nervous system, identify the hormones that different endocrine glands produce, and compare the major structures of the male and female reproductive systems.

The Interdependence of Life

You probably already know that plants and water are vital to the existence of living things. However, you may not be aware that bacteria within the soil play a key role in sustaining organisms as well.In this unit, you will learn about the interactions between living and nonliving things. You will find out how all organisms, however different, are connected within their ecosystems. This unit will also help you explore the characteristics of organisms and compare the features of different types of plants, explore how energy flows through ecosystems, and investigate how nonliving factors affect plants. In addition, you will learn that the relationships between organisms in nature are delicate, and what you can do to help protect these relationships and preserve their environments.

Matter and Energy: Part 1

Most pond organisms would not be able to survive the winter if a layer of ice did not form on the surface of the pond. Many species of plants would not prosper if soil was not able absorb certain nutrients. The special properties of water and soil are vital to the existence of these organisms. In this unit, you will explore the properties of several different types of matter as you identify and compare chemical and physical changes, describe different types of solutions, investigate the unique characteristics of water, analyze acids and bases, describe changes of states of matter, and explain the behavior of fluids.

Matter and Energy: Part 2

Energy is all around you and is required for all that you do. Much of your life is about getting from point A to point B. Some journeys, such as the trek from your bedroom to the bathroom, expend a relatively small amount of energy, while others, such as the drive from your home to a family vacation spot, require a greater amount of energy. In this unit, you will learn about motion, energy, and the relationships between the two. As you learn who Isaac Newton is and compare his laws of motion, you will also distinguish between different types of energy, apply the law of conservation of energy, compare renewable, nonrenewable, and alternative energy sources, and explore how you use energy.

Course Sets

  • GT Science (7)

Kit

  • Science 7 Kit

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Gifted and Talented Science 7 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Glencoe Science: Level Green

Supplies

  • Goggles, safety
  • Thermometers (2)

Social Studies 7 A

Description:
In this course, students study the political, economic, and social changes from the fifth century to modern times. Students make connections between historical events, such as the rise and fall of empires and the rise of democracy, and understand long-term changes and recurring patterns in world history. Students complete a comprehensive study of the history, geography, nations, and cultures of North and South America, and they also hone their social studies skills by reading primary source documents, forming historical hypotheses, and drawing conclusions to the facts presented.

Units:

Focus on History, Part I

In this unit, you will explore the history, religion, and cultures of many parts of the world. You will learn about the rise of the Byzantine and Islamic Empires and how their influences spread throughout the globe. You will also study important African kingdoms and trading centers. You will explore the civilizations of South America, Middle America, and North America, and discover how those cultures were influenced by the arrival of European explorers. Finally, you will learn about Asian civilizations, including China, medieval Japan, and the Great Mughal Empire in India.

Focus on History, Part II

In this unit, you will explore important events in the history of the world from the Middle Ages up to today. You will learn about life in medieval Europe and explore the powerful influences of kings, the Church, and feudalism. You will also study the causes and effects of the Crusades, the Renaissance, and the Reformation. You will examine how Europeans explored the globe and conquered civilizations in the Americas and Africa. You will also explore the influences of the Enlightenment and the Industrial Revolution. You will also examine the impact of nationalism and imperialism and explore important wars and revolutions of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. You will conclude your study with a look at the modern world.

Focus on Geography, Part I

In this unit, you will begin to explore the study of geography. You will learn about the five themes of geography and discover the tools geographers use. You will also examine the planet Earth as well as climate, weather, and vegetation. Finally, you will look at aspects of human geography, including population, migration, and economic and political systems.

Focus on Geography, Part II

In this unit, you will continue your study of geography. You will take a closer look at the relationship between humans and the Earth. You will explore culture, society, and cultural change. You will also learn about natural resources, land use, and people’s effect on the environment.

Online Text/eBook

  • iText World Studies: Medieval Times to Today
  • iText World Studies: Western Hemisphere

Textbook

  • World Studies: Medieval Times to Today †
  • World Studies: Western Hemisphere †

Social Studies 7 B

Description:
In this course, students study the political, economic, and social changes from the fifth century to modern times. Students make connections between historical events, such as the rise and fall of empires and the rise of democracy, and understand long-term changes and recurring patterns in world history. Students complete a comprehensive study of the history, geography, nations, and cultures of North and South America, and they also hone their social studies skills by reading primary source documents, forming historical hypotheses, and drawing conclusions to the facts presented.

Units:

Build a Regional Background: The U.S. and Canada

In this unit you, will begin your study of the United States and Canada. You will explore the geographical features of the countries of North America. You will also examine the histories of the United States and Canada, from European exploration to independence, to the status of world powers. Finally, you will learn about the cultures of the United States and Canada.

Focus on Countries: The U.S. and Canada

In this unit, you will continue your study of the United States and Canada. You will take a more in-depth look at the geography and history of four regions of the United States: the Northeast, the South, the Midwest, and the West. You will also explore geographical and cultural characteristics of Canada’s provinces and territories, specifically Ontario and Quebec, the Prairie Provinces, British Columbia, the Atlantic Provinces, and the Northern Territories.

Build a Regional Background: Latin America

In this unit you will begin your study of Latin America. You will explore the geographical features of the countries of Latin America. You will also examine the histories of South and Central America, from the height of their early civilizations, to European exploration and conquest, to the achievement of independence. Finally, you will learn about the cultures of Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America.

Focus on Countries: Latin America

In this unit, you will continue your study of Latin America. You will take a more in-depth look at the geography and history of several countries that make up Latin America. You will study the Central American nations of Mexico, Guatemala, and Panama. You will also explore the history and current events affecting the people in the Caribbean countries of Cuba, Haiti, and Puerto Rico. Finally, you will examine the South American nations of Brazil, Peru, Chile, and Venezuela.

Online Text/eBook

  • iText World Studies: Medieval Times to Today
  • iText World Studies: Western Hemisphere

Textbook

  • World Studies: Medieval Times to Today †
  • World Studies: Western Hemisphere †

Educational Technology and Online Learning 7

Description:
Seventh graders in Educational Technology and Online Learning learn how to create presentation slideshows and use electronic media to create a report. This course also includes a demonstration of the major applications used in business environments. Internet safety skills are reinforced as students use electronic media and slideshows to create posters or public service announcements for the community on online predators or bullying.

Units:

Introduction

In this unit, you will be presented with a series of tutorials that are designed to help you understand the content and structure of this course. You will learn that each lesson in this course presents or develops a technology skill using academic content. You will also become familiar with how the lessons are organized and how to navigate through them. Finally, you will explore basic keyboarding concepts and skills.

Internet Safety

In this unit, you will learn how to use the Internet in a safe and responsible way as a tool for communication, research, and collaboration. The unit begins by explaining the concept of a virtual community and discusses topics such online bullying and negative networking/gangs online. You will recognize Internet safety concerns including the importance of choosing a safe user name and keeping personal information safe from strangers, risks associated with online shopping, and the threat of online predators. Finally, you will learn about intellectual property and copyright concepts. You will also examine the consequences that are associated with piracy and illegal music downloading.

Study Skills

In this unit, you will learn various strategies related to time management, organization, and goal setting. These strategies include color coding by subject, utilizing your student planner, and scheduling. Then you will create Venn Diagrams, and you will use these diagrams to compare and contrast information. Finally, you will explore mnemonic techniques to assist with memorization, helpful test-taking tips, and various methods of studying for tests.

Microsoft® Word

In this unit, you will continue to explore the features of Microsoft® Word. You will highlight, bold, and italicize text. You will navigate between different Microsoft Office programs and between documents in the same program. You will be introduced to more of the functions in the Insert, Format, Tools, and Table drop-down menus including learning how to insert comments, images and word art; formatting your document using bullets and numbers, borders and shading, and columns; and learning how to use the thesaurus and the autocorrect options. Finally, you will create and format a table in a Microsoft Word document.

Microsoft® Excel

In this unit, you will create formulas, adjust column width, and enter text into a Microsoft® Excel spreadsheet. You will conduct research on the Internet, navigate between different programs, and cut and paste data from an Internet resource into a spreadsheet. You will create borders, resize fonts, and apply conditional formatting. Finally, you will use Microsoft Excel’s Chart Wizard feature to create various charts, line graphs, and bar graphs. You will also learn how to modify labels within a chart and resize and reposition a chart on a spreadsheet.

Microsoft® PowerPoint

In this unit, you will explore a variety of features in Microsoft® PowerPoint. You will learn how to select a design template, add new slides, apply various slide layouts, and add animations to your presentation. You will navigate between two programs in order to copy and paste text from Microsoft Word or another word processing software program to a Microsoft PowerPoint slide. By the end of this unit, you will learn how to create and apply transitions between slides in a presentation.

Elective Courses

Middle Chinese I

Description:
Chinese I is an introductory-level course that will introduce the student to Mandarin Chinese. In this course, the student will learn listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a variety of activities, including LiveLesson® sessions with a native Mandarin speaker! The units are designed to introduce the student to Chinese language and culture through familiar topics such as my family, my week, and food. Culture is presented throughout the course to help the student make connections between his culture and the culture of people in the Mandarin-speaking world.

Units:

My World

In this unit, you will begin to study Mandarin, the official language of China and many other countries. Millions of people around the world speak Mandarin. This unit will teach you about Mandarin’s importance in the world. You will also learn Mandarin words that describe your family. By the end of the unit, you will know how to introduce yourself and your family to others.

My Time

How is your life different from the life of a student who speaks Mandarin? In this unit, you will learn how students spend their time in countries where Mandarin is spoken. You will look for ways their activities are alike and different from yours. This unit will also introduce you to the Mandarin words that describe everyday activities and time at school.

My Food

All cultures have different traditional foods, these are foods that are eaten for special occasions or have been eaten for a very long time . Just like you have your own food traditions, other cultures have their own food traditions, too. In this unit, you will learn about food customs in Mandarin-speaking countries. You will also learn Mandarin terms that describe food.

Middle Chinese II

Description:
Middle Chinese II enables the student to further develop his communication skills as he listens, speaks, reads, and writes Mandarin Chinese at a more advanced level. The student will continue to learn about Chinese culture as the student studies about historic places in China and other Mandarin-speaking countries and learns of the holidays and special traditions celebrated there. The student will practice his acquisition of Mandarin Chinese skills by continuing to converse with a native Mandarin speaker.

Units:

My Travels

In this unit, you will take a trip through historical places in China and other Mandarin-speaking countries. During this experience, you will learn to describe people, yourself, places, and types of transportation.

My Holidays

What holidays do you celebrate? The people in the Mandarin-speaking world may celebrate similar holidays. They also have their own special holidays. In this unit, you will learn about the important holidays celebrated in China and other Mandarin-speaking countries. You will learn about why the holiday is celebrated, its history, and its importance to students your age in the MSW. You will compare what you learn about the Mandarin-speaking world with your own country.

My Home

What are homes like in the Mandarin-speaking world? How are they different from homes in the United States? In this unit, you will learn about a typical home in some Mandarin-speaking countries, including the uses for different rooms of the home. You will find out how the activities that happen in the rooms are alike and different from yours. In this unit, you will also learn the names of some objects that can be found in a home, like furniture, clothes, flowers, and pets. Finally, in this unit, you will learn some stories and traditions about home life in the Mandarin-speaking world.

Middle Sign Language

Description:
In this course, students are introduced to the fundamental concepts of American Sign Language. Students explore vocabulary, grammar, and conversational skills using basic signing and fingerspelling techniques.

Units:

Intro

In this unit, your student will be introduced to American Sign Language, or ASL. He will study the history of ASL and learn how it became the standard language for deaf and hard of hearing people in North America. He will also learn about some of the accepted rules of etiquette in Deaf culture. This introductory unit also teaches your student how to sign the letters of the alphabet and the mechanics of fingerspelling.

Numbers

This unit introduces the signing of numbers. Your student will learn how to sign numbers 1–100, as well as the signs for dollars and cents. A variety of fun activities give your student a chance to practice using ASL to discuss counting and using money.

Time

In this unit, your student will study various aspects of time. Not only will he learn how to communicate time using ASL, he will also learn the signs for the 7 days of the week and the 12 months of the year. The signs for various holidays as well as the four seasons are also taught in this unit.

Nouns

Your student will learn the signs for some commonly used nouns and pronouns. She will also be introduced to the ASL concepts of Indexing, Agency, and Nonmanual Markers. Combining these new concepts and the signs your student has learned will expand her growing library of American Sign Language knowledge.

Descriptions

This unit will teach your student how to sign various descriptions using American Sign Language. He will learn how to sign comparative adjectives and show comparison between two or more nouns or pronouns. Also, he will learn the signs for descriptive words that express size, shape, possession, color, and location. In addition, he will combine some previously taught signs for numbers, time, and nouns, with descriptive signs taught in this unit.

Middle Spanish I

Description:
Students learn Spanish in real-life situations. Students also write in Spanish and increase their vocabulary. Speaking exercises, which teachers review, are another important part of the course.

Middle Spanish II

Description:
Students learn Spanish in real-life situations. Students also write in Spanish and increase their vocabulary. Speaking exercises, which teachers review, are another important part of the course.

Music IV

Description:
The Music courses, with content developed by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, focus on teaching basic music concepts through traditional children’s songs and classical music examples. Students develop fine and gross motor skills that will enable them to keep a steady beat and learn rhythm instruments. Music IV teaches students the six elements in music, while rounding out their knowledge of music notation and of rhythmic and melodic patterns.

Units:

Music Terminology

In this unit you will learn six primary elements of music: beat, rhythm, melody, pitch, dynamics, and tempo. You will learn these concepts by singing folk songs and performing movement activities. You will listen to and identify these elements in musical examples. Finally, you will discover how these elements relate to each other.

The Sounds of Music

In this unit you will learn about the four sections of the orchestra and the main instruments that make up each section. You will discover how each instrument group produces sound and the differences between instruments in the same section. You will compare and contrast the instruments used in the orchestra to those used in a band. Finally, the responsibilities of the conductor will be discussed.

A Tour Through Time

In this unit you will go back in time and learn about three historical music periods: Baroque, Classical, and Romantic. You will also explore three different types of compositions: the fugue, the symphony, and the concerto. Additionally, you will learn about some of the famous composers who wrote these types of musical pieces. Finally, you will develop a historical time line with the information learned throughout the unit.

Music Notation

In this unit you will be introduced to rhythmic and melodic notation. You will learn to identify simple rhythmic and melodic patterns in folk songs. You will then learn how to read and write music notation on the music staff.

Home Life

Description:
Here, students select from a number of projects that develop skills through fun, experiential learning projects. Activities include cooking, crafts, sewing, home maintenance, family outings, and genealogy. Recently added projects include Lemonade Stand and Backyard Ecosystems.

Units:

In the Kitchen

In the Garage

In the Store

In the Garden

In the Family

MS Introduction to Entrepreneurship I

Description:
In this course you will learn the basics needed to plan and launch your own business. Do you have what it takes to start a new business? Do you have an idea for a business but need the tools to get started? This course will provide you with the core skills you need to become successful. In this course you will study the characteristics of successful entrepreneurs. You will also learn about self-employment and basic economic concepts related to small businesses, such as competition and production. This course will also walk you through the steps of setting up a business, including developing a business plan, a mission and a vision, attracting investors, and marketing your company.

Units:

Course Overview

In this unit, you will receive a basic overview of the course. You will learn how to navigate through the course, find and zip files, set up your Web browser, and complete coursework. You will also learn about using trustworthy sources, avoiding plagiarism, and making proper citations.

The Role of the Entrepreneur

In this unit, you will receive an introduction to what it means to be an entrepreneur. You will learn about types of entrepreneurs and the role of entrepreneurs in society. This unit will also explain basic economic concepts related to entrepreneurship, including producers and consumers, strong and weak economies, and capitalism and competition.

Entrepreneurship as a Career

In this unit, you will learn more about the life of an entrepreneur. This unit will explore some of the advantages and disadvantages of self-employment as well as detail the characteristics, skills, and education of successful entrepreneurs. This unit will also discuss reasons why a person becomes an entrepreneur and career paths that help develop entrepreneurial skills and characteristics.

Economic Principles

In this unit, you will learn more about some basic economic concepts related to entrepreneurship. You will learn about profit and loss, profit motive, and competition. You will also learn about production, goods, scarcity, and the law of supply and demand.

Production and Delivery

In this unit, you will learn how entrepreneurs produce and deliver goods and services to markets. You will explore some of the different industries and delivery methods. You will also learn about related economic concepts, including economic utility, economies of scale, market saturation, and product life cycle.

Small Business Basics

In this unit, you will explore the stages and forms of small businesses. Related to this, you will learn about how to form departments and factors that contribute to success and failure. You will also become more familiar with the importance of business ethics.

Business Ideas and Opportunities

In this unit, you will learn the role of entrepreneurs and small businesses in society and the global economy. Related to this, you will explore how business trends affect entrepreneurial ideas and opportunities. You will also learn about methods and resources that will help you generate business ideas and wisely select the best plan based on your goals, skills, personality, and resources.

Defining Your Business

In this unit, you will learn about the importance and parts of a business plan. Related to this, you will how to craft a mission and vision statement. You will also learn how to determine the scope of a business, including the products and services that will be offered.

Business Organization

In this unit, you will learn about various forms of business organization as well as accompanying legal and tax procedures. Related to this, you will learn about franchising, business licenses, and permits. You will also explore ways to organize and manage employees, records, purchasing, and inventory.

Marketing Basics

In this unit, you will explore basic concepts related to marketing an entrepreneurial initiative or business, including market positioning, penetration, and research. You will also learn about establishing a corporate and brand image and the steps involved in developing a marketing message.

Promoting Your Company

In this unit, you will learn about diverse methods for promoting an entrepreneurial initiative or business. Related to this, you will explore promotional methods, costs, and evaluation. You will also learn about advertising methods and goals as well as the parts of a marketing plan.

WebQuest

Description:
Students help scientists monitor frog and toad populations across the country using FrogWatch USA™. Managed by the Association of Zoos & Aquariums, FrogWatch USA uses data collected by students to develop new ways to protect amphibians, which are extremely sensitive to ecological changes. Students visit a local wetland site once a week, make careful observations, and submit their data online. This online project joins Connections Academy students and scientists around the country as they gather and analyze data.

Business Keyboarding

Prerequisites:
A high-speed Internet connection is necessary to download the program required for this course.

Note: This course contains applications that are not compatible with a Mac computer. The use of these applications is necessary for successful completion of this course.

Description:
In this course, the student will explore a variety of keyboarding strategies including learning the function of all the keys, how to find them quickly, and the importance of keyboarding for his future career. Major concepts of this course include the alphabetic and numeric keyboard, history of the keyboard and new technology, and keyboard skill building (speed and accuracy).

Units:

Learning the Game Part 1

Learning the Game is an introduction to the course. The game motif is expanded as it relates learning a new game to learning the rules of the course and the concept of keyboarding.Welcome to the Keyboarding Game! Working through Unit 1 will be much like opening the box to a new game and learning the rules and how to use the game board and game pieces. Here, you will familiarize yourself with the basic rules of the game, including electronic communication rules (Netiquette), and begin to work on becoming accustomed to the game board. Finally, you will perform some of the beginning moves in playing the game of keyboarding. As with any game, learning the rules and becoming proficient with the moves will make playing the game easier and increase your chance of success. Remember to have fun!

Learning the Game Part 2

In Unit 1, you focused on learning the Alpha keys. In Unit 2, you will continue to practice their keying skills while learning the number keys (both alphanumeric and keypad).

Playing the Game

You have now learned the basics of proper keying. You will now begin to learn about formatting business documents while they continue to practice your keying skills using MT3. Now that you have learned the basic skills of the keyboarding game, you are ready to move on to applying those skills. In Unit 3, you will continue to practice your keyboarding skills, as well as learning proper formatting for letters, memos, and reports. In addition, you’ll spend some time learning more about your favorite game.

Games in Your Future?

This unit focuses on career choices and is referred to as a reality check (we can’t all play games for a living). You will complete an interest inventory and select a career to research. This research project will be the final project for the course, worth 20% of the course grade when combined with the timed writing score. Instead of taking a single exam at the end of the course to show that you’ve mastered all of the skills needed to play the keyboarding game, you will complete a final project. Unit 4 is that project. All of the career assignments in Unit 4 must be completed satisfactorily in order for you to receive a passing grade in this course. The tasks you will be asked to perform include all of the skills you’ve been practicing throughout the course. As in the other units of this course, you will also take a timed writing exam at the end of Unit 4. You will continue to do some skillbuilding activities to improve your speed throughout this unit.

MS Digital Arts I

Description:
In this course you will become familiar with basic concepts essentially to visual and digital art, such as line, shape, form, color, value, space, and texture. Using Inkscape, a free open-source program, you will also develop core artistic skills through the creation of original digital art. You will have the opportunity to express yourself as well through a course-long art project that involves the creation of a still life scene.

Units:

Course Overview

In this unit, you will learn how to use the course technology. You will learn how to navigate through the course, find and zip files, set up your Web browser, and complete coursework. You will also learn about using trustworthy sources, avoiding plagiarism, and making proper citations.

Introduction to Digital Art

In this unit, you will learn about basic concepts that inform visual arts, digital arts, and computer graphics. You will also start to learn how to use Inkscape, a software program for creating digital art.

Lines

In this unit, you will explore the use of lines in art. Using Inkscape, you will create different types of lines, including a special kind of curve called the Bezier Curve. You will also start an art project that you will continue to work on throughout the course. This project will involve the creation of a still life scene depicting a glass, a decanter, and a bowl of fruit.

Shape and Form

In this unit, you will explore the use of shapes and forms in art. Using Inkscape, you will create different types of shapes. You will also continue with your art project, adding shapes and forms to your still life.

Color

In this unit, you will learn how color is related to light and how color is used in art. You will use Inkscape’s color sliders to practice using color. You will also continue with your art project, adding grapes and colors to your still life.

Value

In this unit, you will learn how value, or the lightness or darkness of a color, is used in art. Using Inkscape, you will create a color value scale. You will also continue with your art project, adding value to your still life through highlights.

Space

In this unit, you will explore how space and perspective is used in art. Using Inkscape, you will draw two-dimensional objects that look three-dimensional. You will also continue with your art project. You will add a table and book to your still life to create the illusion of 3D space.

Texture

In this unit, you will explore how texture is used in art. You will create different textures using Inkscape’s filters. You will also complete your art project by adding texture to different parts of your still life.

One thought on “GRADE 7 (Middle School): K to 12 Curriculum Guide – National Connections Academy

  1. Pingback: Where K to 10 is BETTER than K to 12 | Multilingual Philippines

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