GRADE 8 (Middle School): K to 12 Curriculum Guide – National Connections Academy

National Connections Academy’s (NaCA) full course listing below is a comprehensive look at every course available for the Grade 8 (Middle School) level. The push to get into the K to 12 basic education program was, to be charitable about it, in part because of the proponents’ desire to upgrade our basic education program to improve the quality/skills of our student output/graduates and in part to keep up with the Joneses. Well, the following is posted here to show us what the Joneses are doing.

WARNING!!!!! THE FOLLOWING GRADE 8 (MIDDLE SCHOOL) COURSE GUIDE BY NATIONAL CONNECTIONS ACADEMY – WHICH IS NOT SANCTIONED BY DEPED — IS BEING POSTED HERE FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY:

Grade 8 Core Courses – Middle School

Health and Physical Education 8

Description:
Eighth graders use their knowledge of fitness and nutrition to establish individual goals to promote a healthy lifestyle. Sportsmanship and teamwork are explored, as well as the components for personal wellbeing. Students are introduced to the warning signs and downfalls of eating disorders, steroid use, and other serious health issues.

Units:

Understanding Your Health

In this unit, you will learn about your health and the three sides of the health triangle. The three sides explain what your body needs to be healthy. You will learn about healthy habits, your physical changes during puberty, and the role of lifestyle factors in a person’s life.
In this Physical Education portion of the lesson, you will learn about the The President’s Challenge. The President’s Challenge is a program created by the U. S. government that rewards students for being physically active and physically fit. You will learn about the history and guidelines of the Active Lifestyle Program, why staying active is important, and how to set activity goals and log results. By the end of this unit, you will have taken your first steps towards earning the Presidential Active Lifestyle Award.

Mental and Emotional Health

In this unit, you will learn the traits for good mental and emotional health. You will build skills for self-esteem and learn about your emotions. You will find out how to express your emotions and manage your anger. In the final lesson you will learn about grief, coping with loss, and the ways to support someone who is experiencing grief.

Mental and Emotional Problems

In this unit, you will learn about anxiety disorders, two mood disorders, and major signs of major depression. You will identify the warning signs of suicide, and demonstrate ways that effective communication skills can be used to help someone with mental and emotional problems. You will also learn about determining if someone needs professional help.

Nutrition for Health

In this unit, you will learn the six main classes of nutrients, what foods can be eaten to obtain nutrients, and what kinds of foods will keep you healthy according to the MyPyramid food guidance system. You will find out how to choose healthy foods and analyze the key nutrients in a food product.

Your Body Image

In this unit, you will learn about the importance of a healthy body image, the effects of eating and physical activity on weight, and methods to maintain a healthy weight. You will also discover the symptoms of various eating disorders and find out about what kind of help is available.

Your Body Systems

In this unit, you will learn about the different body systems. You will find out how the systems work together and the different functions each has.

Communicable Diseases

In this unit, you will learn about common communicable diseases, how germs are spread, and how to protect yourself from disease. You will discover the main line of defense against pathogens, find out how the immune system functions, and how antibodies protect the body.

Safety and Emergencies

In this unit, you will learn how to stay safe in the home and at school. You will learn common reasons for accident chains and how to avoid injuries. You will also learn how to avoid injuries outdoors, in the water, and in weather emergencies

Environmental Health

In this unit, you will learn about pollution in the air, water, and soil. You will also find out ways that you can take action to prevent further pollution.

CD/DVD

  • Elementary Yoga DVD (set of 2)

Course Sets

  • Health and Physical Education (8)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Get Fit Handbook

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Glencoe Teen Health: Course 3

Supplies

  • Resistance band (2)

Art 8

Description:
Students in eighth grade Art learn how visual art influences people and places, and alternatively, how people and places influence the world of art. Students make connections between art from across time and location as they create their own art meant to influence ideas, actions, or environments.

Units:

Reviewing the Basics

In Unit 1, you will review the basics of art. You will explore art definitions, perception and imagination, the elements and principles of art, aesthetics, and the methods of art historians. You will have the opportunity to draw, paint, design, and write in this unit.

Influences on Art

In Unit 2 you will learn about some of the influential forces that affected art through time. You will become familiar with the surprising connections between art and other disciplines, including math, technology, music, and social studies. You will then produce your own artworks based on these connections.

Art That Influences People

In contrast to the previous unit, Unit 3 discusses the effect art has had on people and cultures through time. You will become familiar with the influential power art can have on opinions, feelings, beliefs, and actions. You will have the opportunity to create artwork with such intentions.

Art That Influences Spaces

The focus of Unit 4 is the influence of art on an environment. Whether it is a public space, a building, or room, the elements and principles of art can alter, enhance, or exploit an environment. This design-focused unit will allow you to experiment with impacting your surrounding environments.

Course Sets

  • Art (8)

Kit

  • Art 8 Kit

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Glencoe Exploring Art

Supplies

  • Drawing pad
  • Paint, watercolor (set of 10 colors)
  • Paintbrushes, watercolor (4)
  • Pastels, chalk (set of 24 colors)

Textbook

  • Glencoe Exploring Art †

Gifted and Talented Language Arts 8 A

Description:
In Gifted and Talented Language Arts 8 A, the student will work at an accelerated pace while engaging in more complex and challenging instructional activities. Each unit focuses on a central question; and the student will read, analyze, and interpret a variety of literature that informs his perspective about questions such as the following: “Which is more important, the journey or the destination?”, “What do you do when you don’t know what to do?”, and “How do you stay true to yourself?”.

The student will develop his reading skills and expand his vocabulary while reading across the genres of nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and drama. He will also select literature for independent reading and choose either Johnny Tremain or My Brother Sam is Dead as his novel unit. The student will strengthen his mastery of the writing process and the six traits of writing as he composes personal, creative, and persuasive writing.

Units:

Reading: What’s in It for You?

In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: What’s in it for you? You will read selections that help you think about the role that reading plays in your life. You will read autobiographies and biographies and examine how this genre affects you by allowing you to learn from the experiences of others. The ultimate goal is to apply this knowledge to your life. You will use skills such as connecting, setting a purpose, activating prior knowledge, and identifying author’s purpose. You will learn how to use context clues to understand unknown words. You will also learn about nouns and pronouns.

Which Is More Important: Journey or Destination?

If you have ever gone on a vacation, you may have found the journey just as exciting as your actual destination. In this unit, you will read about journeys of great importance. As you consider journeys and destinations, you will read myths and folktales from a variety of cultures and practice reading skills including connecting, analyzing, making inferences, and comparing and contrasting. During this unit, you will also identify and correctly use different kinds of phrases and clauses and write a personal narrative.

Johnny Tremain

 

Johnny Tremain is a Newbery Award–winning historical novel about a young boy in colonial Boston. Johnny is a talented but arrogant silversmith’s apprentice whose life is turned upside-down when he injures his hand. In time, he becomes a messenger boy on horseback for the Sons of Liberty and meets several famous Founding Fathers. He later becomes a spy for the Sons of Liberty, takes part in the Boston Tea Party, and struggles with loss at the battles of Lexington and Concord. Throughout the unit, you will identify literary elements and create an illustrated map of Boston during Revolutionary times.

Johnny Tremain is the recommended novel for Language Arts 8 A. My Brother Sam Is Dead may be read instead of Johnny Tremain with prior teacher approval. Lessons and activities for My Brother Sam Is Dead will appear on the lower half of the lesson pages.

My Brother Sam Is Dead is a Newbery Honor historical novel about a young boy in colonial America. Timothy Meeker is the younger son of a tavern-keeper in the small village of Redding, Connecticut. On the eve of the Revolutionary War, his brother, Sam, joins the rebel Continental Army. As the war goes on, Tim and his family face many challenges, and Tim struggles to decide which side he supports. Throughout the unit, you will identify literary elements, analyze themes, and create a newspaper article about an event in the novel.

What Do You Do When You Don’t Know What to Do?

In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: What do you do when you don’t know what to do? You will read about how other people have dealt with situations that seemed overwhelming, and you will consider strategies for coping with problems that seem too big to handle. You will learn how to read poetry by using skills such as connecting, evaluating, interpreting, and monitoring comprehension. You will examine how writers use metaphor, simile, and alliteration in a variety of poems (narrative, lyric, free verse). You will also learn about the importance of using correct subject-verb agreement.

How Do You Stay True to Yourself?

In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: How do you stay true to yourself? You will read and consider a variety of perspectives that address the Big Question. You will learn how to read short stories by using skills such as analyzing, questioning, predicting, and making inferences. You will examine how short stories are organized and study theme, setting, characterization, and imagery. You will learn how to analyze words by identifying the base word and any prefixes and suffixes.

Which Is More Important: Journey or Destination?

In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: Which is more important, the journey or the destination? You will read about the journeys of real and imagined people and consider how they might answer the Big Question. You will learn how to read folktales by using skills such as analyzing, making inferences, predicting, and comparing and contrasting. You will examine literary elements and apply them to folktales. You will learn about modifying phrases and clauses, and misplaced and dangling modifiers.

Course Sets

  • GT Language Arts (8)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Gifted Language Arts 8 A and B Course Guide

Novel

  • Johnny Tremain
  • The Giver

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Glencoe Literature: Course 3

Gifted and Talented Language Arts 8 B

Description:
In Gifted and Talented Language Arts 8 B, the student will continue to work at an accelerated pace while engaging in more complex and challenging instructional activities. As he reads, analyzes, and interprets a variety of literature, the student will ponder answers to questions such as the following: “How do you keep from giving up when bad things happen?”, What’s worth fighting for? What’s not?”, and “What is the American dream?”.

The student will further develop his reading skills and expand his vocabulary while reading across the genres of nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and drama. He will also select literature for independent reading and choose either The Giver or Ella Minnow Pea as his novel unit. The students will strengthen his mastery of the writing process and the six traits of writing as he composes creative, persuasive, and research writing.

Units:

When Is the Price Too High?

In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: When is the price too high? You will consider how people weigh the costs and benefits of their decisions and develop criteria for weighing your own decisions, and you will learn how to read informational articles by using skills such as previewing, skimming and scanning, understanding text structures, and identifying main idea and supporting details. You will examine how tone, humor, irony, and foreshadowing influence the reader. You will learn about multiple-meaning words and use simple sentences in your writing.

How To Keep from Giving Up When Bad Things Happen

In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: How do you keep from giving up when bad things happen? You will read about people who endure hardships but persevere with optimism and determination. You will learn how to read dramatic pieces by using skills such as drawing conclusions, interpreting, paraphrasing and summarizing, and visualizing. You will examine the structure of a play and study the historical influences on the English language.

What’s Worth Fighting For? What’s Not?

In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: What’s worth fighting for? What’s not? You will learn what other people find important, how they act on those values, and how they seek to persuade others. You will learn how to read persuasive writing by using skills such as distinguishing fact from opinion, questioning, reviewing, and clarifying.

The Giver

 

Eleven-year-old Jonas lives in a seemingly ideal world. There is no war or pain, and there are no choices. Every person is assigned a role in the community. When Jonas turns 12, he is chosen to receive special training from The Giver himself—a man who alone holds the key to the true pain and pleasure of life: memories. Now it is time for Jonas to receive the truth. What will Jonas do once he experiences the power of deep emotions? This gripping and provocative Newbery Award–winning novel keeps readers turning the pages and exploring the special qualities that make each of us human. You will identify literary elements and write a personal response to the novel’s ambiguous ending.

The Giver is the recommended novel for Language Arts 8. Ella Minnow Pea may be read instead of The Giver with prior teacher approval. Lessons and activities for Ella Minnow Pea will appear on the lower half of the page. Do not proceed wtih Ella Minnow Pea unless you have received approval from your teacher.

Ella Minnow Pea and her family live on the fictional island of Nollop. This tiny independent country has just one claim to fame: it is the birthplace of Nevin Nollop, the creator of the popular pangram, “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.” Like most of her fellow citizens, Ella loves the English language and is devastated to learn that the High Council has banned the use of certain letters of the alphabet in writing or speech. In a race against the clock, Ella must help create a new pangram consisting of only thirty-two letters. If she is successful, the islanders will regain the right to communicate freely, and Ella will be reunited with her loved ones. As you read Ella Minnow Pea , you will define vocabulary words in context analyze literary elements.

What Is the American Dream?

In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: What is the American dream? You will consider what the American dream has meant to different people in different times and places and how the American dream is still being redefined and reinvented today. You will learn how to read historical text by using skills such as analyzing, understanding cause and effect, identifying main idea and supporting details, and identifying author’s purpose. You will study irregular verbs and consider English as a changing language. You will examine text structure and identify how the writing is organized.

Course Sets

  • GT Language Arts (8)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Gifted Language Arts 8 A and B Course Guide

Novel

  • Johnny Tremain
  • The Giver

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Glencoe Literature: Course 3

Gifted and Talented Literature Study 8

Description:
The Junior Great Books® program employs the method of interpretive readings and discussion being known as the Shared Inquiry™ method. This distinctive approach to learning enables leaders—the teachers and Learning Coaches—to foster a vibrant environment in which a student acquires the habits and strategies of a self-reliant thinker, reader, and learner. Through their own curiosity and attentive questioning, leaders serve as partners in inquiry with the student, helping him work with other students to discover meaning in a reading selection and to build interpretations. The process reaches its fullest expression in Shared Inquiry discussion, where leaders and students think and talk about an interpretive question that arises from a particular story. Using LiveLesson® sessions, the student will interact with peers twice during each unit for Shared Inquiry and presentation of personal writing. The Junior Great Books program includes outstanding works of literature by award-winning authors. Praised for their rich language and international range, and chosen carefully for their ability to support multiple interpretations, the stories in Junior Great Books capture students’ attention and imagination and engage the best of their thinking. Progressing in reading level, conceptual complexity, and length throughout the series, the stories are the foundation for a thoughtful process of reading, discussion, and writing.

Units:

Sucker

In this unit, you will read “Sucker.” You will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, you will share your notes in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, you will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. You will share your writing with your teacher and your class during another LiveLesson session at the end of the unit.

The Summer of the Beautiful White Horse

In this unit, you will read “The Summer of the Beautiful White Horse.” You will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, you will share your notes in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, you will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. You will share your writing with your teacher and your class during another LiveLesson session at the end of the unit.

Rules of the Game

In this unit, you will read “Rules of the Game.” You will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, you will share your notes in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, you will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. You will share your writing with your teacher and your class during another LiveLesson session at the end of the unit.

The Destructors

In this unit, you will read “The Destructors.” You will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, you will share your notes in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, you will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. You will share your writing with your teacher and your class during another LiveLesson session at the end of the unit.

The Watch

In this unit, you will read “The Watch.” You will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, you will share your notes in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, you will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. You will share your writing with your teacher and your class during another LiveLesson session at the end of the unit

Approximations

In this unit, you will read “Approximations.” You will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, you will share your notes in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, you will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. You will share your writing with your teacher and your class during another LiveLesson session at the end of the unit

The Griffin and the Minor Canon

In this unit you will read “The Griffin and the Minor Canon.” You will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, you will share your notes in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, you will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. You will share your writing with your teacher and your class during another LiveLesson session at the end of the unit

Star Food

In this unit, you will read “Star Food.” You will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, you will share your notes in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, you will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. You will share your writing with your teacher and your class during another LiveLesson session at the end of the unit.

Winter

In this unit, you will read “Winter.” You will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, you will share your notes in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, you will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. You will share your writing with your teacher and your class during another LiveLesson session at the end of the unit.

High School Graduation

In this unit, you will read “High School Graduation.” You will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, you will share your notes in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, you will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. You will share your writing with your teacher and your class during another LiveLesson session at the end of the unit.

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Ch. 7–13)

In this unit, you will read Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” (Chapters 7-13). You will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, you will share your notes in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, you will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. You will share your writing with your teacher and your class during another LiveLesson session at the end of the unit.

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Ch. 14–18)

In this unit, you will read Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Chapters 14–18). You will practice active reading by marking passages with notes to indicate contrasting ideas in the story. At the end of the first lesson, you will share your notes in a Shared Inquiry™ discussion of the story during a LiveLesson® session. In the second lesson, you will choose a writing assignment to complete that is connected to the story. You will share your writing with your teacher and your class during another LiveLesson session at the end of the unit.

Course Sets

  • GT Literature Study 8

Textbook

  • JGB Series 8 Anthology Book One

Language Arts 8 A

Description:
In Language Arts 8A, each unit focuses on a central question; the student will read, analyze, and interpret a variety of literature that informs his perspective about questions such as: Which is more important, the journey or the destination?, What do you do when you don’t know what to do?, and How do you stay true to yourself? The student will develop his reading skills and expand his vocabulary while reading across the genres of nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and drama. The student will also self select literature for independent reading and choose either Johnny Tremain or My Brother Sam Is Dead as his novel unit. The student will strengthen his mastery of the writing process and the six traits of writing as he composes personal, creative, and persuasive writing.

Units:

Reading: What’s in It for You?

 

You might be used to reading for entertainment or to relax at the end of a busy day. Those are just two benefits of reading; there are many others that you will explore in this unit.

In this unit, you will learn about the various reasons for reading, including obtaining advice or information about a topic. You will also learn how to identify an author’s purpose and connect to various texts that include autobiographical and biographical selections, as well as essays and short stories. During this unit, you will also review parts of speech and compose a multimedia presentation.

Which Is More Important: Journey or Destination?

If you have ever gone on a vacation, you may have found the journey just as exciting as your actual destination. In this unit, you will read about journeys of great importance. As you consider journeys and destinations, you will read myths and folktales from a variety of cultures and practice reading skills including connecting, analyzing, making inferences, and comparing and contrasting. During this unit, you will also identify and correctly use different kinds of phrases and clauses and write a personal narrative.

Johnny Tremain

 

Johnny Tremain is a Newbery Award–winning historical novel about a young boy in colonial Boston. Johnny is a talented but arrogant silversmith’s apprentice whose life is turned upside-down when he injures his hand. In time, he becomes a messenger boy on horseback for the Sons of Liberty and meets several famous Founding Fathers. He later becomes a spy for the Sons of Liberty, takes part in the Boston Tea Party, and struggles with loss at the battles of Lexington and Concord. Throughout the unit, you will identify literary elements and create an illustrated map of Boston during Revolutionary times.

My Brother Sam Is Dead is a Newbery Honor historical novel about a young boy in colonial America. Timothy Meeker is the younger son of a tavern-keeper in the small village of Redding, Connecticut. On the eve of the Revolutionary War, his brother, Sam, joins the rebel Continental Army. As the war goes on, Tim and his family face many challenges, and Tim struggles to decide which side he supports. Throughout the unit, you will identify literary elements, analyze themes, and create a newspaper article about an event in the novel.Johnny Tremain is the recommended novel for Language Arts 8 A. My Brother Sam Is Dead may be read instead of Johnny Tremain with prior teacher approval. Lessons and activities for My Brother Sam Is Dead will appear on the lower half of the lesson pages.

What Do You Do When You Don’t Know What to Do?

In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: What do you do when you don’t know what to do? You will read about how other people have dealt with situations that seemed overwhelming, and you will consider strategies for coping with problems that seem too big to handle. You will learn how to read poetry by using skills such as connecting, evaluating, interpreting, and monitoring comprehension. You will examine how writers use metaphor, simile, and alliteration in a variety of poems (narrative, lyric, free verse). You will also learn about the importance of using correct subject-verb agreement.

How Do You Stay True to Yourself?

What does it mean to be true to yourself? In this unit, you will consider how personal values and beliefs affect the way people conduct their lives. You will read a variety of short stories and other selections that concern how people’s actions reflect who they are and what they believe. These selections will give you an opportunity to practice reading skills including analyzing, questioning, predicting, and making inferences. During this unit, you will also analyze different types of phrases as well as compound and complex sentences. For your portfolio project, you will write a short story.

Course Sets

  • Language Arts (8)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Language Arts 8 A and B Course Guide

Novel

  • Johnny Tremain
  • The Giver

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Glencoe Literature: Course 3

Language Arts 8 B

Description:
In Language Arts 8B, the student will continue to explore central questions in each unit. As the student reads, analyzes, and interprets a variety of literature, he will ponder answers to questions such as: How do you keep from giving up when bad things happen?, What’s worth fighting for? What’s not?, and What is the American dream? The student will further develop his reading skills and expand his vocabulary while reading across the genres of nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and drama. The student will also self select literature for independent reading and choose either The Giver or Ella Minnow Pea as his novel unit. The student will strengthen his mastery of the writing process and the six traits of writing as he composes creative, persuasive, and research writing.

Units:

When Is the Price Too High?

Making decisions is a difficult process. Weighing costs and benefits can help you make the right choice in any situation. This unit focuses on informational articles that deal with weighing costs and benefits to answer the following question: When is the price too high? While reading the informational articles in this unit, you will practice reading skills including previewing, skimming and scanning, understanding text structures, and identifying main idea and supporting details. You will learn about and correct errors in subject-verb agreement with different types of subjects and verb phrases. You will also write a research report.

How to Keep from Giving Up When Bad Things Happen

 

No matter how carefully you plan your life, you can never really predict what is going to happen. Life-altering events may happen unexpectedly, which might lead to confusion and sadness. In this unit, you will read selections that illustrate holding on to hope in the face of adversity. They will help you to answer the following question: How do you keep from giving up when bad things happen?

The focus of this unit is on drama. As you read the dramatic texts and other selections, you will practice reading skills including drawing conclusions, interpreting, paraphrasing and summarizing, and visualizing. You will learn how to use commas correctly with different types of clauses and phrases. For your portfolio project, you will write a dramatic scene.

What’s Worth Fighting For? What’s Not?

 

What actions do you take when something is important to you? When you have a concern or feel strongly about an issue, you might try to persuade others to join you in addressing that concern or supporting the issue. This unit includes persuasive texts and other selections that will help you answer the following questions: What’s worth fighting for? What’s not?

As you read the selections in this unit, you will practice reading skills including distinguishing fact from opinion, questioning, reviewing, and clarifying. You will learn how to correct punctuation usage and other errors in mechanics. You will also write a persuasive essay.

The Giver

 

Eleven-year-old Jonas lives in a seemingly ideal world. There is no war or pain, and there are no choices. Every person is assigned a role in the community. When Jonas turns 12, he is chosen to receive special training from The Giver himself—a man who alone holds the key to the true pain and pleasure of life: memories. Now it is time for Jonas to receive the truth. What will Jonas do once he experiences the power of deep emotions? This gripping and provocative Newbery Award–winning novel keeps readers turning the pages and exploring the special qualities that make each of us human. You will identify literary elements and write a personal response to the novel’s ambiguous ending.

The Giver is the recommended novel for Language Arts 8. Ella Minnow Pea may be read instead of The Giver with prior teacher approval. Lessons and activities for Ella Minnow Pea will appear on the lower half of the page. Do not proceed wtih Ella Minnow Pea unless you have received approval from your teacher.

Ella Minnow Pea and her family live on the fictional island of Nollop. This tiny independent country has just one claim to fame: it is the birthplace of Nevin Nollop, the creator of the popular pangram, “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.” Like most of her fellow citizens, Ella loves the English language and is devastated to learn that the High Council has banned the use of certain letters of the alphabet in writing or speech. In a race against the clock, Ella must help create a new pangram consisting of only thirty-two letters. If she is successful, the islanders will regain the right to communicate freely, and Ella will be reunited with her loved ones. As you read Ella Minnow Pea, you will define vocabulary words in context analyze literary elements.

What Is the American Dream?

In this unit, you will explore the Big Question: What is the American dream? You will consider what the American dream has meant to different people in different times and places and how the American dream is still being redefined and reinvented today. You will learn how to read historical text by using skills such as analyzing, understanding cause and effect, identifying main idea and supporting details, and identifying author’s purpose. You will study irregular verbs and consider English as a changing language. You will examine text structure and identify how the writing is organized.

Course Sets

  • Language Arts (8)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Language Arts 8 A and B Course Guide

Novel

  • Johnny Tremain
  • The Giver

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Glencoe Literature: Course 3

Algebra Readiness A (Pre-Algebra)

Description:
This is the first of two courses that comprise Algebra Readiness. In this course, the student will be introduced to basic algebraic principles. The student will review properties of expressions and integers. The student will solve one-step equations and inequalities with positive and negative integers, decimals, fractions, and exponents. Then the student will explore problems involving operations of fractions and will apply his knowledge of algebra to solve real-world ratio, proportion, and percent problems. Finally, the student will examine and evaluate two-step and multi-step equations and inequalities.

Units:

Integers and Algebraic Expressions

In this unit, you will review the foundational concepts necessary for algebra and mathematical reasoning including integer operations and use of variables to represent unknown quantities. Emphasis will be placed upon achieving mastery of integer operations and the skill of rewriting a subtraction expression as addition of an opposite integer.

Rational Numbers

This unit will focus on the use of fractions and exponents. In this unit, you will order rational numbers, convert between decimals and fractions, and perform operations using fractions and mixed numbers. In addition, you will learn to use a formula and to evaluate a power. At the conclusion of this unit, you will complete a portfolio project using fractions to adjust portions for more or fewer people in a healthy recipe of your choosing.

Real Numbers and the Coordinate Plane

Previously in your studies, you worked with a set of numbers called the rationals. In this unit, you will begin to work with another set of numbers called the irrationals. By the end of this unit, you will be able to estimate the value of an irrational number by comparing it to one or two rational numbers. You will also use irrational numbers to approximate the length of lines by applying the Pythagorean Theorem. Finally, you will use a coordinate plane to create symmetrical figures.

Applications of Proportions

Applications of Percent

In this unit, you will learn that a percent is a ratio comparing a number to one hundred. You will then use percents to find and compare amounts of increase or decrease and to calculate new prices based on markup, discount, and sales tax. The portfolio project at the end of this unit will require you to find products online and calculate a new price based upon a percent discount and state sales tax.

Equations and Inequalities

In this unit, you will use algebraic skills to solve for an unknown quantity in an equation or inequality. You will start with two-step equations and work your way through multiple-step equations to solving equations with variables on both sides of the equal sign.

Algebra Readiness B (Pre-Algebra)

Description:
This is the second of two courses that comprise Algebra Readiness. In this course, the student will explore basic algebraic principles. The student will also examine and evaluate two-step and multi-step equations and inequalities and then explore and use graphs to solve linear relations and functions. Next, the student will be introduced to basic concepts of geometry including angle relationships, parallel lines, polygons, circles, and transformations. The student will continue to apply his knowledge of geometry and algebra to solve area and volume problems. Then the student will explore nonlinear functions and polynomials. Finally, the student will examine properties of right triangles, data analysis, and probability.

Units:

Geometry

In this unit, you will learn to classify polygons based upon their sides and angles, and perform computations using related angles and parallel lines. In addition, you will find the area of common figures and the circumference of circles. Finally, you will use basic geometry tools to construct angles and parallel lines.

Measurement

This unit focuses on the skills of calculating surface area and volume. By the end of the unit, you will be able to calculate the exact surface area and volumes of specific 3-D figures that are based upon rectangles and circles, including spheres. You will display your knowledge at the end in a portfolio project by finding, measuring, and calculating the surface area and volume of two items you probably already have at home.

Using Graphs to Analyze Data

In this unit of the course, you will examine, analyze and construct scatter plots and tables. With these skills, you will be able to roughly predict the strength and direction of a pattern of association between two things. You will also find measures of central tendency, and determine which graph and measure of central tendency best represents a data set.

Probability

In this unit of the course, you will find probabilities and odds of events.

Functions

Polynomials and Properties of Exponents

In this final unit, you will be working with expressions called polynomials. By the end, you will be able to add, subtract, and multiply these expressions. You will also simplify powers and use negative and zero exponents.

Gifted and Talented Math 8 (Geometry) A

Description:
This is the first of two courses that comprise Gifted and Talented Math 8. Throughout the course, the student will use virtual manipulatives and tools to explore the principles of logic, proofs, and constructions. The student will use the midpoint and distance formulas to solve a variety of problems involving the coordinate plane. The student will also study parallel and perpendicular lines, including special angle pairs. The student will use triangle concepts to find angle measures, prove triangles congruent, and discover relationships within one and two triangles. This course will conclude with the study of polygons and quadrilaterals, during which the student will learn the properties and formulas to find angle measures and classify parallelograms. Throughout the course, the student will learn concepts through a variety of instructional strategies, solve real-world applications, and complete an assortment of activities.

Units:

Tools of Geometry

This unit introduces various topics in geometry. The beginning of the unit involves representing three-dimensional solid figures using nets, isometric drawings, and orthographic drawings. Special drawing techniques are introduced, such as slanted lines to represent three-dimensional perspective and dashed lines to represent hidden lines. An introduction to basic geometry terms such as points, lines, and planes is included. These are introduced as the building blocks of geometry on which all other geometry terms are defined. Postulates and axioms are introduced as well as naming techniques.Measuring segments and angles are introduced along with the Ruler Postulate, Segment Addition Postulate, Protractor Postulate, and Angle Addition Postulate. Types of angles as well as special angle pairs and their relationships are included. The degree unit is introduced and the use of a protractor to find angle measure is included. A ruler is also used to find segment length. Problems involving algebra, such as solving linear equations, are used to find segment lengths and angle measures. The concept of creating constructions without the use of measurement by using only a straightedge and protractor is introduced in this unit. Four basic constructions are included, such as constructing congruent segments, congruent angles, perpendicular bisectors, and angle bisectors. These constructions will be used to create other constructions, such as an equilateral triangle. They will also be used to solve problems, such as creating a 45o angle.
The unit concludes with finding the midpoint of segments on a number line and on a coordinate plane using the midpoint formulas. The distance formula is used to find the distance between two points in a coordinate plane. Algebra skills are reviewed as necessary for solving problems using midpoint and distance formulas. Other formulas included at the end of the unit are formulas used to find perimeter, circumference, and area of geometric figures such as squares, rectangles, triangles, and circles. The area of a region is also explored.
Many new vocabulary terms associated with the topics are included. A variety of real-world applications are embedded throughout the unit. A variety of activities are also used to enhance instruction, such as BrainPOP® movies, Gizmos, Discovery Educationstreaming movies, SkillsTutor™, and PowerGeometry. Assessments in Unit 1 include quick checks, quizzes, a unit portfolio involving origami, a discussion on how math is used in daily life, and a unit test.

Standard Geometry

This unit focuses on reasoning and writing formal proofs. You will observe patterns in numeric and geometric sequences and use inductive reasoning to make conjectures. Then you will explore conditional and biconditional statements. The conclusion of the unit introduces two types of formal proofs, two-column proofs and paragraph proofs. Finally, you will complete a portfolio project about the ancient Greeks’ use of deductive reasoning and mathematics, and participate in a discussion on inductive and deductive reasoning.

Parallel and Perpendicular Lines

 

In this unit you will explore concepts associated with parallel and perpendicular lines. The unit begins with identifying parallel, perpendicular, and skew lines. Parallel and perpendicular planes will also be introduced, as well as the special types of angles formed by two lines and a transversal. You will participate in a discovery activity that explores special properties of angles formed by two parallel lines and a transversal. The theorems and postulate for the special angle pairs will be proven and used to find angle measures. Then the converse of these theorems and postulate are introduced and used to prove lines parallel. Different forms of proofs such as two-column, paragraph, and flow-proofs involving parallel and perpendicular lines will be ncluded. Theorems involving triangles are also introduced, such as the triangle angle-sum theorem and triangle exterior angle theorem. New constructions involving parallel and perpendicular lines are then introduced, as well as constructions involving special quadrilaterals and a regular polygon inscribed in a circle. To finish out this unit, concepts related to linear equations in a coordinate plane will be explored, such as slope and different forms in which linear equations are written. Slope relationships of parallel and perpendicular lines are also explored.

Activities throughout the unit include dynamic online activities, BrainPOP® movies, Gizmos™, SkillsTutor, and Teachlet® tutorials. Practice opportunities such as online practice, textbook problems, journal entries, and worksheets are included. Assessments are included throughout the unit in the form of Quick Checks, quizzes, a unit test, and a portfolio involving constructions.

Congruent Triangles

 

This unit covers concepts associated with congruent triangles, such as identifying corresponding parts of congruent triangles, identifying isosceles and equilateral triangles, proving triangles congruent, and proving parts of triangles congruent. Lessons build on your understanding and skills related to angles and triangles. Visualization skills will be used for overlapping triangles. Theorems and postulates such as SSS, SAS, ASA, AAS, and HL will be introduced throughout the unit. Corresponding parts of congruent triangles are congruent (CPCTC) are used to prove parts of triangles congruent. You will use and apply properties of isosceles and equilateral triangles. You will also prove two triangles congruent using other congruent triangles.A variety of methods will be used throughout the unit for instruction, practice, and review of concepts. You will complete worksheets and online practice for various concepts. Math writing journal activities require you to relate concepts to real-world applications and apply your knowledge in order to respond to thought-provoking questions. Online and interactive activities, such as Teachlet® tutorials, SkillsTutor, and Gizmos will be used to further your understanding of concepts.

Various assessments will be used throughout the unit to measure your progress such as Quick Checks, quizzes, and a unit test. You will also complete a unit portfolio that involves viewing a Discovery Education™ streaming video on how math played a role in the design, technology, and construction of ancient Greek architecture and modern skyscrapers using triangles. You will then complete related tasks involving architecture and triangles to complete the portfolio.

Triangles

 

In this unit, you will discover and explore concepts involving relationships within triangles. You will expand on the skills learned in previous units, such as using the midpoint formula to find the midsegments of triangles and the distance formula to examine relationships in triangles. You will learn new theorems, such as the Triangle Midsegment Theorem, Perpendicular Bisector Theorem, Angle Bisector Theorem, and Hinge Theorem, as well as theorems related to concurrency in triangles and triangle inequality.

You will also explore relationships within a triangle using the Comparison Property of Inequality, the Corollary to the Triangle Exterior Angle Theorem, as well as those theorems related to triangle inequality. Finally, you will identify and use properties of midsegments, perpendicular bisectors, angle bisectors, medians, altitudes, and inequalities involving angles and sides of triangles through a variety of activities.

Activities in this unit include Teachlet® tutorials, worksheets, writing journal activities, Gizmos™, and online interactive activities aligned to the textbook through PowerGeometry. You will take a variety of assessments throughout the unit to gauge your comprehension of concepts. You will get instant feedback from self-check assessments embedded in each lesson. You will also complete a portfolio project to assess your understanding of inequalities in a triangle. Other assessments include Quick Checks, quizzes, and a unit test.

Polygons and Quadrilaterals

 

In this unit, you will examine properties of quadrilaterals and use the properties to prove and classify special types of quadrilaterals such as parallelograms, rectangles, rhombuses, squares, trapezoids, and kites. You will use properties of parallel and perpendicular lines and diagonals to classify quadrilaterals. You will also use theorems to find angle measures of polygons, both interior and exterior angles. You will explore geometry in the coordinate plane through classifying polygons in the coordinate plane with formulas such as slope, midpoint, and distance as well as naming coordinates using variables for a general polygon and proving theorems using coordinate proofs.

You will complete various activities throughout the unit to apply your knowledge. You will create and use Venn diagrams to show the relationships among polygons, equilateral polygons, equiangular polygons, and regular polygons. You will also complete interactive Gizmos to explore angle sums of polygons and properties of special parallelograms, and to classify quadrilaterals. You will watch BrainPOP® movies, Teachlet® tutorials, and homework video tutors throughout the unit to aid instruction. Finally, you will engage in online practice and math writing journal activities to further reinforce understanding of various concepts.

There are self-check activities, feedback, and assessments embedded throughout the unit. Assessments include a portfolio on the coordinate grid system throughout history and a discussion on the coordinate proof, as well as quick checks, quizzes, and a unit test.

Gifted and Talented Math 8 A Semester Exam

In this unit, you will have the opportunity to prepare for and take the semester exam. Since this is a comprehensive exam, it may be helpful to organize your notes in the order of the course outline before you begin to review. Using the test-taking strategies that you have previously learned can help you with both the objective questions and essays.

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Geometry: On Level

Textbook

  • Geometry: On Level †

Gifted and Talented Math 8 (Geometry) B

Description:
This is the second of two courses that comprise Geometry. Throughout the course, the student will use virtual manipulatives and tools to explore area, surface area, and volume, and study the concept of similarity as it relates to various figures. The student will use Trigonometry and right triangle concepts, such as 30-60-90, 45-45-90, and the Pythagorean Theorem to solve problems. The student will also be introduced to vectors and learn to solve problems involving magnitude and direction. In addition, the student will study transformation concepts, such as translations, reflections, rotations, and dilations as well as concepts associated with symmetry. The student will learn to use formulas to find the areas of a variety of two-dimensional shapes. This course concludes with an exploration of concepts related to circles, such as arcs, angles, and intersecting lines such as chords, secants, and tangents.

Throughout the course, the student will learn concepts through a variety of instructional strategies, solve real-world applications, and complete an assortment of activities.

Units:

Similarity

In this unit on similarity, you will learn to use ratios to compare quantities, write proportions, and solve problems. You will also use ratios and proportions to determine whether two polygons are similar, to find unknown side lengths of similar figures, and to solve problems relating to scale factor. You will explore similar triangles and related postulates and theorems. You will also use similarity to find indirect measurements in right triangles, as well as the relationship between segments and between lengths. Finally, you will complete a portfolio assessment involving scale drawing.

Right Triangles and Trigonometry

In this unit, you will explore concepts related to right triangles. You will use the Pythagorean Theorem and explore the concept of a Pythagorean triple, as well as properties of special right triangles. You will use trigonometric ratios to find side lengths and angle measures of right triangles. To solve real-world scenarios, you will use angles of elevation and depression. Lastly, you will learn about vectors and use them to describe the magnitude and directions of objects. Your activities include a class discussion involving ramp building codes and a unit portfolio that explores the history and many proofs of the Pythagorean Theorem.

Transformations

 

Concepts related to transformations are explored in this unit. Students will explore translations, reflections (including glide reflection and compositions of reflections), rotations, and dilations. Students will identify, find, and compose transformations both on and off the coordinate plane. Students will identify isometries as well as the type of symmetry in figures and three-dimensional objects. Students will also use reflection to minimize distance, find angles of rotation, and scale factor for dilation. A variety of activities are used in lessons through out the unit to aid instruction. Activities involving the textbook, Teachlet® tutorials, and movie clips provide information on concepts and using concepts to solve problems. Real-world examples are incorporated into each lesson. A variety of worksheets, such as question worksheets based on examples in the textbook, puzzle worksheets, and practice worksheets involving problem-solving are used to practice concepts and review vocabulary. Math writing journal activities as well as online interactive activities provide discovery learning opportunities for students.

A variety of assessment tools are incorporated into each lesson. Online practices, self-check activities, and feedback are used through out. Assessments such as quick checks, quizzes, and a unit test appear at the end of each lesson. A portfolio involving frieze patterns is also used for assessment purposes.

Area

In this unit, you will explore and find the area of polygons and circles. You will use formulas to find areas of regular polygons, parallelograms, triangles, trapezoids, rhombuses, kites, and circles, including parts of circles such as sectors and segments. You will use trigonometry to find the areas of regular polygons and triangles, as well as the area formula for a triangle given SAS. In addition, you will use 30°-60°-90° and 45°-45°-90° special triangles to find area. You will also learn and apply concepts related to regular polygons, including perimeter and area ratios of similar figures, as well as circle concepts like naming arcs, finding arc measure and length, and finding the circumference of a circle. You will use these concepts to find the area of composite figures and missing dimensions of figures, in addition to using them to solve real-world applications. Finally, you will complete a portfolio project involving circle graphs, and participate in a discussion about Heron’s Formula.

Surface Area and Volume

This unit covers area and volume of three-dimensional solids. The unit begins with defining the polyhedron space figure, the parts of a polyhedron, and examining cross sections. Euler’s Formula is introduced and used to find the number of faces, vertices, or edges of a polyhedron. Students will explore and use formulas to find lateral areas, surface areas, and volume of three-dimensional solids, such as prisms, cylinders, pyramids, cones, and composite figures. Sphere terminology such as center, radius, diameter, great circle, hemispheres, and circumference are explored and defined. Students will use formulas to find the area and volume of spheres. The unit ends with exploring the areas and volumes of similar solids, including identifying similar solids, finding scale factor, and using area and volume ratios to solve problems.

Circles

This unit explores concepts related to circles, such as central angles, inscribed angles, and angles formed by intersecting lines–including chords, tangents, and secants. Students will examine the relationships between angles both inside and outside of a circle and the measure of the intercepted arcs. These relationships, as well as properties of tangents, will be used to solve problems involving angle measure, arc measure, and segment lengths. Students will also explore circles in the coordinate plane, including writing an equation of a circle in standard form. Using radius, circle center, or a point on the circle, students will graph circles in the coordinate plane and be able to identify circle center and radius in an equation of a circle in standard form.A variety of instructional strategies and activities are used to engage students and enhance instruction. Such activities include online Teachlet® tutorials, Gizmos, activities, math writing journal activities, puzzles, and practice worksheets. Online practice, self-assessment, and problem feedback are included throughout the unit. Students will also complete a unit portfolio involving paper-folding activities to explore properties of chords.

Gifted and Talented Math 8 B Semester Exam

This unit reviews concepts from Semester B of the Gifted and Talented Math 8 course. The unit begins with a review assignment which intends to help the student recall topics from Units 1 through 6. A vocabulary activity explores special terms and properties from the course. Two Quarter Tests are also given for students to practice the concepts from this semester in a more formal format. The assessment is included at the conclusion of the unit in the form of the Semester Exam.

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Geometry: On Level

Textbook

  • Geometry: On Level †

Gifted and Talented Science 8 A

Description:
Focusing on the fundamentals of Earth, life, and physical sciences, Science 8 lessons are designed to engage students through exploration and discovery. Life science units expose students to traits and how they change, relationships between organisms and their environments, and cycles in nature. Earth’s changing geology is studied in the Earth science unit, in which students learn the causes and effects of earthquakes and volcanoes and the bodies that comprise the solar system. In the physical science unit, students learn about atoms and elements and how to calculate different forms of motion and force.

Units:

The Nature of Science

Whether you are examining bikes to determine which is the fastest or testing a cake to determine whether it is done, you are acting like a scientist. Scientists spend much of their time observing and investigating the world around them. In this introductory unit, you will explore the nature of science and learn how to set up and perform a scientific experiment, an activity that you will repeat throughout the course. In addition, you will analyze how science and technology influence your everyday life.

Humans and Heredity

 

Why are your eyes the color they are? Why are you probably much larger than your ancestors were when they were your age? How did the breakfast that you ate this morning become the energy you use to complete your schoolwork?

In this unit, you will examine factors that shape how you look and how your body functions. More specifically, you will study natural selection; explain the relationships between genetics and heredity; analyze the structure of a cell, organ, and organ system; and interpret how negative feedback mechanisms help the body maintain a stable internal environment.

Ecology

Earth is home to tens of millions of species, some of which coexist on remote deserted islands, and others in heavily populated cities. Although well-studied, much is still unknown about the relationships of species with each other and with their nonliving surroundings, such as air and water. In this unit, you will analyze some basic interactions among organisms and between living and nonliving things as you investigate how the environment influences life on Earth, explore how energy flows through ecosystems, and compare communities that live in different places on Earth. Maybe one day you will have the opportunity to apply what you learn to solve one of the many ecological mysteries.

Earth’s Changes over Time

 

Forces that are too far below Earth’s surface for people to see created many of the rock formations that exist today. Some of these structures took millions of years to form. So how do scientists analyze these rock structures?

In this unit, you will learn how scientists study mass rock movement as you explore continental drift and seafloor spreading, examine the theory of plate tectonics, identify the processes of fossil formation, and explain how to determine the absolute and relative ages of rocks. In addition, you will analyze the causes and results of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

Course Sets

  • GT Science (8)

Kit

  • Science 8 Kit

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Gifted and Talented Science 8 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Glencoe Science: Level Blue

Supplies

  • Goggles, safety

Gifted and Talented Science 8 B

Description:
Focusing on the fundamentals of Earth, life, and physical sciences, Science 8 lessons are designed to engage students through exploration and discovery. Life science units expose students to traits and how they change, relationships between organisms and their environments, and cycles in nature. Earth’s changing geology is studied in the Earth science unit, in which students learn the causes and effects of earthquakes and volcanoes and the bodies that comprise the solar system. In the physical science unit, students learn about atoms and elements and how to calculate different forms of motion and force.

Units:

Earth’s Place in the Universe

 

Do you ever wonder what it is like in other parts of the country, far from where you live? How about in other countries in the world? What about on other planets? In other galaxies?

In this unit, you will travel around the universe to continue to explore the sun, the moon, stars, planets, and galaxies. As you do so, you will describe relationships among Earth, the moon, and the sun; identify unique characteristics of the planets; examine how stars evolve; and learn much more about what’s going on in the universe.

Chemistry of Matter

 

Some substances, like water and oxygen, are crucial to our existence, while others, such as carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide, can be deadly. What makes the latter substances, which contain some of the same elements that the former do, so dangerous? The characteristics of a substance are sometimes due to how the substance formed and how it is held together, and not just what it contains.

In this unit, you will analyze the chemical makeup of matter as you describe the structure of an atom, identify the relationship between an element’s position in the periodic table and its traits, compare how different atoms combine, and investigate chemical reactions.

Motion, Forces, and Energy

Every day you probably witness a force moving an object, or energy enabling something to function. In this unit, you will learn more about how and why things move, as well as how energy affects change. You will distinguish among different types of motion, analyze the law of conservation of momentum, explain Newton’s laws of motion, calculate different forces, describe simple and complex machines, and compare various forms of energy.

Physical Interactions

 

How does lightning travel from the sky to the ground? How does an engine work? How do bats, which are blind, locate and capture prey? You will learn the answers to these questions as you investigate physical interactions of matter and waves.

In this unit, you will examine electric charge, electric current, and electric circuits; analyze the behavior of magnets and of objects placed in magnetic fields; and explore the unique relationship between electricity and magnetism and how this relationship can be manipulated to produce an electric current or a magnetic field. In addition, you will study the characteristics of various types of waves and make inferences about the behavior of waves. Finally, at the end of this unit, you will complete the last checkpoint of the “Lost in Space” semester lab and complete a laboratory report and summary to turn in to your instructor for a grade. Have fun!

Course Sets

  • GT Science (8)

Kit

  • Science 8 Kit

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Gifted and Talented Science 8 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Glencoe Science: Level Blue

Supplies

  • Goggles, safety

Science 8 A

Description:
Focusing on the fundamentals of Earth, life, and physical sciences, Science 8 lessons are designed to engage students through exploration and discovery. Life science units expose students to traits and how they change, relationships between organisms and their environments, and cycles in nature. Earth’s changing geology is studied in the Earth science unit, in which students learn the causes and effects of earthquakes and volcanoes and the bodies that comprise the solar system. In the physical science unit, students learn about atoms and elements and how to calculate different forms of motion and force.

Units:

The Nature of Science

Whether you are examining bikes to determine which is the fastest, or testing a cake to determine whether it is done, you are acting like a scientist. Scientists spend much of their time observing and investigating the world around them. In this introductory unit, you will explore the nature of science and learn how to set up and perform a scientific experiment, an activity that you will repeat throughout the course. In addition, you will analyze how science and technology influence your everyday life.

Humans and Heredity

 

Why are your eyes the color they are? Why are you probably much larger than your ancestors were when they were your age? How did the breakfast that you ate this morning become the energy you use to complete your schoolwork?

In this unit, you will examine factors that shape how you look and how your body functions. More specifically, you will study natural selection; explain the relationships between genetics and heredity; analyze the structure of a cell, organ, and organ system; and interpret how negative feedback mechanisms help the body maintain a stable internal environment.

Ecology

Earth is home to tens of millions of species, some of which coexist on remote deserted islands, and others in heavily populated cities. Although well-studied, much is still unknown about the relationships of species with each other and with their nonliving surroundings, such as air and water. In this unit, you will analyze some basic interactions among organisms and between living and nonliving things. You will investigate how the environment influences life on Earth, explore how energy flows through ecosystems, and compare communities that live in different places on Earth. Maybe one day you will have the opportunity to apply what you learn to solve one of the many ecological mysteries.

Earth’s Changes over Time

 

Forces that are too far below Earth’s surface for people to see created many of the rock formations that exist today. Some of these structures took millions of years to form. So how do scientists analyze these rock structures?

In this unit, you will learn how scientists study mass rock movement as you explore continental drift and seafloor spreading, examine the theory of plate tectonics, identify the processes of fossil formation, and explain how to determine the absolute and relative ages of rocks. In addition, you will analyze the causes and results of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

Course Sets

  • GT Science (8)

Kit

  • Science 8 Kit

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Gifted and Talented Science 8 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Glencoe Science: Level Blue

Supplies

  • Goggles, safety

Science 8 B

Description:
Focusing on the fundamentals of Earth, life, and physical sciences, Science 8 lessons are designed to engage students through exploration and discovery. Life science units expose students to traits and how they change, relationships between organisms and their environments, and cycles in nature. Earth’s changing geology is studied in the Earth science unit, in which students learn the causes and effects of earthquakes and volcanoes and the bodies that comprise the solar system. In the physical science unit, students learn about atoms and elements and how to calculate different forms of motion and force.

Units:

Earth’s Place in the Universe

 

Do you ever wonder what it is like in other parts of the country, far from where you live? How about in other countries in the world? What about on other planets? In other galaxies?

In this unit, you will travel around the universe to continue to explore the sun, the moon, stars, planets, and galaxies. As you do so, you will describe relationships among Earth, the moon, and the sun; identify unique characteristics of the planets; examine how stars evolve; and learn much more about what’s going on in the universe.

Chemistry of Matter

 

Some substances, like water and oxygen, are crucial to our existence, while others, such as carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide, can be deadly. What makes the latter substances, which contain some of the same elements that the former do, so dangerous? The characteristics of a substance are sometimes due to how the substance formed and how it is held together, and not just what it contains.

In this unit, you will analyze the chemical makeup of matter as you describe the structure of an atom, identify the relationship between an element’s position in the periodic table and its traits, compare how different atoms combine, and investigate chemical reactions.

Motion, Forces, and Energy

Every day you probably witness a force moving an object, or energy enabling something to function. In this unit, you will learn more about how and why things move, as well as how energy affects change. You will distinguish among different types of motion, analyze the law of conservation of momentum, explain Newton’s laws of motion, calculate different forces, describe simple and complex machines, and compare various forms of energy.

Physical Interactions

 

How does lightning travel from the sky to the ground? How does an engine work? How do bats, which are blind, locate and capture prey? You will learn the answers to these questions as you investigate physical interactions of matter and waves.

In this unit, you will examine electric charge, electric current, and electric circuits; analyze the behavior of magnets and of objects placed in magnetic fields; and explore the unique relationship between electricity and magnetism and how this relationship can be manipulated to produce an electric current or a magnetic field. In addition, you will study the characteristics of various types of waves and make inferences about the behavior of waves. Finally, at the end of this unit, you will complete the last checkpoint of the “Lost in Space” semester lab and complete a laboratory report and summary to turn in to your instructor for a grade. Have fun!

Course Sets

  • GT Science (8)

Kit

  • Science 8 Kit

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Gifted and Talented Science 8 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText Glencoe Science: Level Blue

Supplies

  • Goggles, safety

Social Studies 8 A

Description:
Social Studies 8 examines the American experience from pre-colonial times through Reconstruction following the Civil War. U.S. political, economic, and social history is explored from a chronological point of view with lessons that develop the students’ abilities to analyze, interpret, and evaluate different forms of information. Throughout the course, students make connections between historical events and their impact on the American people and landscape.

Units:

Different Worlds Meet

In this unit, you will learn about the people and places that existed in the Americas before the arrival of Europeans. You will examine how these civilizations were affected by European exploration and conquest of the continent. You will also explore the influences of religion and technology on Europeans’ exploration of the globe. Finally, you will study the roles of Spain and Portugal on the New World and learn about early European settlements in North America.

Colonial Settlement

In this unit you will learn how North America was colonized by European nations. You will explore what life was like in Early English settlements and compare and contrast the colonies in different regions of North America. You will also study the impact of government, religion, and culture on colonists in America. Finally, you will examine the impact of the French and Indian War on England and France’s struggle for control of the continent.

Creating a Nation

In this unit, you will explore the creation of the United States as a new nation. You will examine the reasons colonists demanded independence from England and why they were willing to wage a war to achieve freedom from King George III. You will take an in-depth look at the Revolutionary War and learn about important people of that time. You will also learn about the plans of government the nation’s founders experimented with and how they finally agreed on the Constitution. Finally, you will examine the Constitution, the federal government of the United States, and read about the rights and responsibilities of American citizens.

The New Republic Part I

In this unit, you will explore the early years of the American Republic up to 1825. You will learn about early challenges and conflicts faced by the new Union. You will examine the development of the first political parties in the United States. You will also read about the War of 1812 and military struggles with Native Americans as settlers moved west. You will study the factors that made westward expansion possible, such as the Lousiana Purchase, economic growth, and technological innovation. Finally, you will look at the development of regional differences in the United States and examine the foreign policies the nation adopted in the early nineteenth century.

Course Sets

  • Social Studies (8)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Social Studies 8 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText The American Republic

Social Studies 8 B

Description:
Social Studies 8 examines the American experience from pre-colonial times through Reconstruction following the Civil War. U.S. political, economic, and social history is explored from a chronological point of view with lessons that develop the students’ abilities to analyze, interpret, and evaluate different forms of information. Throughout the course, students make connections between historical events and their impact on the American people and landscape.

Units:

The New Republic Part II

In this unit you will explore the early years of the American Republic up to 1825. You will learn about early challenges and conflicts faced by the new Union. You will examine the development of the first political parties in the United States. You will also read about the War of 1812 and military struggles with Native Americans as settlers moved west. You will study the factors that made westward expansion possible, such as the Lousiana Purchase, economic growth, and technological innovation. Finally, you will look at the development of regional differences in the United States and examine the foreign policies the nation adopted in the early nineteenth century.

The Growing Nation

In this unit, you will continue to explore the growth of the United States between 1820 and 1860. You will examine challenges and changes to the fragile political system. You will also read about America’s continued westward expansion, as well as the effect this had on Native Americans. You will examine the United States’ acquisition of new states and territories, including the Oregon Country, Texas, California, and Utah. You will also study the causes and consequences of the United States’ war with Mexico. You will compare and contrast the northern and southern regions of the country. Finally, you will examine calls for social reform in the mid-nineteenth century and how ideas about education, women, and slavery changed during this period.

Civil War and Reconstruction

In this unit, you will explore the history of the United States from 1846 to 1896. You will examine how different ideas about slavery and politics worsened regional tensions in the nation. You will also explore why many southern states seceded and how their actions and the government’s response led to the Civil War. You will study what life was like during the Civil War and compare the Union’s and Confederacy’s goals and strategies. You will read about how the Union won the Civil War and explore plans for healing the nation. Finally, you will examine the period of Reconstruction and describe its effects on both the North and the South.

Modern America Emerges

In this unit, you will preview and explore the history of the United States from 1877 to the present. You will examine the continued exploration of the West and the effect of the United States’ expansion on Native Americans. You will also explore how the United States began to expand its influence in world affairs. You will study how technological advances and immigration influenced life in late nineteenth-century America. You will read about calls for political and social reform. You will also explore the causes and effects of World War I, World War II, and the Cold War period. Finally, you will examine modern America and its war on terrorism.

Course Sets

  • Social Studies (8)

Lesson Manual/Course Guide

  • Social Studies 8 A and B Course Guide

Online Text/eBook

  • iText The American Republic

Educational Technology and Online Learning 8

Description:
Students engage in lessons that address both academic and technology objectives in Educational Technology and Online Learning 8. Multimedia is stressed at this level as students learn how to create and maintain a safe Web site, how to combine technology-based elements within a document, and how to set-up and populate a spreadsheet. Through a combination of multimedia, computers, and projection equipment, students create a presentation for an audience on an online safety topic such as plagiarism, online harassment, or cyberstalking.

Units:

Introduction

In this unit, you will be presented with a series of tutorials that are designed to help you understand the content and structure of this course. You will learn that each lesson in this course presents or develops a technology skill using academic content. You will also become familiar with how the lessons are organized and how to navigate through them. Finally, you will explore basic keyboarding concepts and skills.

Internet Safety

In this unit, you will learn how to use the Internet in a safe and responsible way as a tool for communication, research, and collaboration. The unit begins by explaining the concept of a virtual community and discusses topics such online bullying and negative networking. You will recognize Internet safety concerns including the importance of choosing a safe user name and keeping personal information safe from strangers, risks associated with online shopping, and the threat of online predators. Finally, you will learn about intellectual property and copyright concepts. You will also examine the consequences that are associated with piracy and illegal music downloading.

Study Skills

In this unit, you will learn various strategies related to time management, organization, and goal setting. These strategies include color coding by subject, utilizing your student planner, and scheduling. Then you will create Venn Diagrams, and you will use these diagrams to compare and contrast information. Finally, you will explore mnemonic techniques to assist with memorization, helpful test-taking tips, and various methods of studying for tests.

Microsoft® Word

In this unit, you will continue to explore the features of Microsoft® Word. You will highlight, bold, and italicize text. You will navigate between different Microsoft Office programs and between documents in the same program. You will be introduced to more of the functions in the Insert, Format, Tools, Table, and View drop-down menus including learning how to insert comments, images and word art; formatting your document using bullets and numbers, borders and shading, columns, and text alignment; learning how to use the thesaurus and the autocorrect options; and adding the drawing toolbar. Finally, you will learn how to use Microsoft WordPad, which is a basic word processor for Microsoft Windows.

Microsoft® Excel

In this unit, you will create formulas, adjust column width, and enter text into a Microsoft® Excel spreadsheet. You will conduct research on the Internet, navigate between different programs, and cut and paste data from an Internet resource into a spreadsheet. You will create borders, resize fonts, and apply conditional formatting. Finally, you will use Microsoft Excel’s Chart Wizard feature to create various charts, line graphs, and bar graphs. You will also learn how to modify labels within a chart and resize and reposition a chart on a spreadsheet.

Microsoft® PowerPoint

In this unit, you will explore a variety of features in Microsoft® PowerPoint. You will learn how to select a design template, add new slides, apply various slide layouts, and add animations to your presentation. You will navigate between two programs in order to copy and paste text from Microsoft® Word or another word processing software program to a Microsoft PowerPoint slide. By the end of this unit, you will learn how to create and apply transitions between slides in a presentation.

Elective Courses

Middle Chinese I

Description:
Chinese I is an introductory-level course that will introduce the student to Mandarin Chinese. In this course, the student will learn listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a variety of activities, including LiveLesson® sessions with a native Mandarin speaker! The units are designed to introduce the student to Chinese language and culture through familiar topics such as my family, my week, and food. Culture is presented throughout the course to help the student make connections between his culture and the culture of people in the Mandarin-speaking world.

Units:

My World

In this unit, you will begin to study Mandarin, the official language of China and many other countries. Millions of people around the world speak Mandarin. This unit will teach you about Mandarin’s importance in the world. You will also learn Mandarin words that describe your family. By the end of the unit, you will know how to introduce yourself and your family to others.

My Time

How is your life different from the life of a student who speaks Mandarin? In this unit, you will learn how students spend their time in countries where Mandarin is spoken. You will look for ways their activities are alike and different from yours. This unit will also introduce you to the Mandarin words that describe everyday activities and time at school.

My Food

All cultures have different traditional foods, these are foods that are eaten for special occasions or have been eaten for a very long time . Just like you have your own food traditions, other cultures have their own food traditions, too. In this unit, you will learn about food customs in Mandarin-speaking countries. You will also learn Mandarin terms that describe food.

Middle Chinese II

Description:
Middle Chinese II enables the student to further develop his communication skills as he listens, speaks, reads, and writes Mandarin Chinese at a more advanced level. The student will continue to learn about Chinese culture as the student studies about historic places in China and other Mandarin-speaking countries and learns of the holidays and special traditions celebrated there. The student will practice his acquisition of Mandarin Chinese skills by continuing to converse with a native Mandarin speaker.

Units:

My Travels

In this unit, you will take a trip through historical places in China and other Mandarin-speaking countries. During this experience, you will learn to describe people, yourself, places, and types of transportation.

My Holidays

What holidays do you celebrate? The people in the Mandarin-speaking world may celebrate similar holidays. They also have their own special holidays. In this unit, you will learn about the important holidays celebrated in China and other Mandarin-speaking countries. You will learn about why the holiday is celebrated, its history, and its importance to students your age in the MSW. You will compare what you learn about the Mandarin-speaking world with your own country.

My Home

What are homes like in the Mandarin-speaking world? How are they different from homes in the United States? In this unit, you will learn about a typical home in some Mandarin-speaking countries, including the uses for different rooms of the home. You will find out how the activities that happen in the rooms are alike and different from yours. In this unit, you will also learn the names of some objects that can be found in a home, like furniture, clothes, flowers, and pets. Finally, in this unit, you will learn some stories and traditions about home life in the Mandarin-speaking world.

Middle Sign Language

Description:
In this course, students are introduced to the fundamental concepts of American Sign Language. Students explore vocabulary, grammar, and conversational skills using basic signing and fingerspelling techniques.

Units:

Intro

In this unit, your student will be introduced to American Sign Language, or ASL. He will study the history of ASL and learn how it became the standard language for deaf and hard of hearing people in North America. He will also learn about some of the accepted rules of etiquette in Deaf culture. This introductory unit also teaches your student how to sign the letters of the alphabet and the mechanics of fingerspelling.

Numbers

This unit introduces the signing of numbers. Your student will learn how to sign numbers 1–100, as well as the signs for dollars and cents. A variety of fun activities give your student a chance to practice using ASL to discuss counting and using money.

Time

In this unit, your student will study various aspects of time. Not only will he learn how to communicate time using ASL, he will also learn the signs for the 7 days of the week and the 12 months of the year. The signs for various holidays as well as the four seasons are also taught in this unit.

Nouns

Your student will learn the signs for some commonly used nouns and pronouns. She will also be introduced to the ASL concepts of Indexing, Agency, and Nonmanual Markers. Combining these new concepts and the signs your student has learned will expand her growing library of American Sign Language knowledge.

Descriptions

This unit will teach your student how to sign various descriptions using American Sign Language. He will learn how to sign comparative adjectives and show comparison between two or more nouns or pronouns. Also, he will learn the signs for descriptive words that express size, shape, possession, color, and location. In addition, he will combine some previously taught signs for numbers, time, and nouns, with descriptive signs taught in this unit.

Middle Spanish I

Description:
Students learn Spanish in real-life situations. Students also write in Spanish and increase their vocabulary. Speaking exercises, which teachers review, are another important part of the course.

Middle Spanish II

Description:
Students learn Spanish in real-life situations. Students also write in Spanish and increase their vocabulary. Speaking exercises, which teachers review, are another important part of the course.

Music IV

Description:
The Music courses, with content developed by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, focus on teaching basic music concepts through traditional children’s songs and classical music examples. Students develop fine and gross motor skills that will enable them to keep a steady beat and learn rhythm instruments. Music IV teaches students the six elements in music, while rounding out their knowledge of music notation and of rhythmic and melodic patterns.

Units:

Music Terminology

In this unit you will learn six primary elements of music: beat, rhythm, melody, pitch, dynamics, and tempo. You will learn these concepts by singing folk songs and performing movement activities. You will listen to and identify these elements in musical examples. Finally, you will discover how these elements relate to each other.

The Sounds of Music

In this unit you will learn about the four sections of the orchestra and the main instruments that make up each section. You will discover how each instrument group produces sound and the differences between instruments in the same section. You will compare and contrast the instruments used in the orchestra to those used in a band. Finally, the responsibilities of the conductor will be discussed.

A Tour Through Time

In this unit you will go back in time and learn about three historical music periods: Baroque, Classical, and Romantic. You will also explore three different types of compositions: the fugue, the symphony, and the concerto. Additionally, you will learn about some of the famous composers who wrote these types of musical pieces. Finally, you will develop a historical time line with the information learned throughout the unit.

Music Notation

In this unit you will be introduced to rhythmic and melodic notation. You will learn to identify simple rhythmic and melodic patterns in folk songs. You will then learn how to read and write music notation on the music staff.

Home Life

Description:
Here, students select from a number of projects that develop skills through fun, experiential learning projects. Activities include cooking, crafts, sewing, home maintenance, family outings, and genealogy. Recently added projects include Lemonade Stand and Backyard Ecosystems.

Units:

In the Kitchen

In the Garage

In the Store

In the Garden

In the Family

MS Introduction to Entrepreneurship I

Description:
In this course you will learn the basics needed to plan and launch your own business. Do you have what it takes to start a new business? Do you have an idea for a business but need the tools to get started? This course will provide you with the core skills you need to become successful. In this course you will study the characteristics of successful entrepreneurs. You will also learn about self-employment and basic economic concepts related to small businesses, such as competition and production. This course will also walk you through the steps of setting up a business, including developing a business plan, a mission and a vision, attracting investors, and marketing your company.

Units:

Course Overview

In this unit, you will receive a basic overview of the course. You will learn how to navigate through the course, find and zip files, set up your Web browser, and complete coursework. You will also learn about using trustworthy sources, avoiding plagiarism, and making proper citations.

The Role of the Entrepreneur

In this unit, you will receive an introduction to what it means to be an entrepreneur. You will learn about types of entrepreneurs and the role of entrepreneurs in society. This unit will also explain basic economic concepts related to entrepreneurship, including producers and consumers, strong and weak economies, and capitalism and competition.

Entrepreneurship as a Career

In this unit, you will learn more about the life of an entrepreneur. This unit will explore some of the advantages and disadvantages of self-employment as well as detail the characteristics, skills, and education of successful entrepreneurs. This unit will also discuss reasons why a person becomes an entrepreneur and career paths that help develop entrepreneurial skills and characteristics.

Economic Principles

In this unit, you will learn more about some basic economic concepts related to entrepreneurship. You will learn about profit and loss, profit motive, and competition. You will also learn about production, goods, scarcity, and the law of supply and demand.

Production and Delivery

In this unit, you will learn how entrepreneurs produce and deliver goods and services to markets. You will explore some of the different industries and delivery methods. You will also learn about related economic concepts, including economic utility, economies of scale, market saturation, and product life cycle.

Small Business Basics

In this unit, you will explore the stages and forms of small businesses. Related to this, you will learn about how to form departments and factors that contribute to success and failure. You will also become more familiar with the importance of business ethics.

Business Ideas and Opportunities

In this unit, you will learn the role of entrepreneurs and small businesses in society and the global economy. Related to this, you will explore how business trends affect entrepreneurial ideas and opportunities. You will also learn about methods and resources that will help you generate business ideas and wisely select the best plan based on your goals, skills, personality, and resources.

Defining Your Business

In this unit, you will learn about the importance and parts of a business plan. Related to this, you will how to craft a mission and vision statement. You will also learn how to determine the scope of a business, including the products and services that will be offered.

Business Organization

In this unit, you will learn about various forms of business organization as well as accompanying legal and tax procedures. Related to this, you will learn about franchising, business licenses, and permits. You will also explore ways to organize and manage employees, records, purchasing, and inventory.

Marketing Basics

In this unit, you will explore basic concepts related to marketing an entrepreneurial initiative or business, including market positioning, penetration, and research. You will also learn about establishing a corporate and brand image and the steps involved in developing a marketing message.

Promoting Your Company

In this unit, you will learn about diverse methods for promoting an entrepreneurial initiative or business. Related to this, you will explore promotional methods, costs, and evaluation. You will also learn about advertising methods and goals as well as the parts of a marketing plan.

WebQuest

Description:
Students help scientists monitor frog and toad populations across the country using FrogWatch USA™. Managed by the Association of Zoos & Aquariums, FrogWatch USA uses data collected by students to develop new ways to protect amphibians, which are extremely sensitive to ecological changes. Students visit a local wetland site once a week, make careful observations, and submit their data online. This online project joins Connections Academy students and scientists around the country as they gather and analyze data.

Business Keyboarding

Prerequisites:
A high-speed Internet connection is necessary to download the program required for this course.

Note: This course contains applications that are not compatible with a Mac computer. The use of these applications is necessary for successful completion of this course.

Description:
In this course, the student will explore a variety of keyboarding strategies including learning the function of all the keys, how to find them quickly, and the importance of keyboarding for his future career. Major concepts of this course include the alphabetic and numeric keyboard, history of the keyboard and new technology, and keyboard skill building (speed and accuracy).

Units:

Learning the Game Part 1

Learning the Game is an introduction to the course. The game motif is expanded as it relates learning a new game to learning the rules of the course and the concept of keyboarding.Welcome to the Keyboarding Game! Working through Unit 1 will be much like opening the box to a new game and learning the rules and how to use the game board and game pieces. Here, you will familiarize yourself with the basic rules of the game, including electronic communication rules (Netiquette), and begin to work on becoming accustomed to the game board. Finally, you will perform some of the beginning moves in playing the game of keyboarding. As with any game, learning the rules and becoming proficient with the moves will make playing the game easier and increase your chance of success. Remember to have fun!

Learning the Game Part 2

In Unit 1, you focused on learning the Alpha keys. In Unit 2, you will continue to practice their keying skills while learning the number keys (both alphanumeric and keypad).

Playing the Game

You have now learned the basics of proper keying. You will now begin to learn about formatting business documents while they continue to practice your keying skills using MT3. Now that you have learned the basic skills of the keyboarding game, you are ready to move on to applying those skills. In Unit 3, you will continue to practice your keyboarding skills, as well as learning proper formatting for letters, memos, and reports. In addition, you’ll spend some time learning more about your favorite game.

Games in Your Future?

This unit focuses on career choices and is referred to as a reality check (we can’t all play games for a living). You will complete an interest inventory and select a career to research. This research project will be the final project for the course, worth 20% of the course grade when combined with the timed writing score. Instead of taking a single exam at the end of the course to show that you’ve mastered all of the skills needed to play the keyboarding game, you will complete a final project. Unit 4 is that project. All of the career assignments in Unit 4 must be completed satisfactorily in order for you to receive a passing grade in this course. The tasks you will be asked to perform include all of the skills you’ve been practicing throughout the course. As in the other units of this course, you will also take a timed writing exam at the end of Unit 4. You will continue to do some skillbuilding activities to improve your speed throughout this unit.

MS Digital Arts I

Description:
In this course you will become familiar with basic concepts essentially to visual and digital art, such as line, shape, form, color, value, space, and texture. Using Inkscape, a free open-source program, you will also develop core artistic skills through the creation of original digital art. You will have the opportunity to express yourself as well through a course-long art project that involves the creation of a still life scene.

Units:

Course Overview

In this unit, you will learn how to use the course technology. You will learn how to navigate through the course, find and zip files, set up your Web browser, and complete coursework. You will also learn about using trustworthy sources, avoiding plagiarism, and making proper citations.

Introduction to Digital Art

In this unit, you will learn about basic concepts that inform visual arts, digital arts, and computer graphics. You will also start to learn how to use Inkscape, a software program for creating digital art.

Lines

In this unit, you will explore the use of lines in art. Using Inkscape, you will create different types of lines, including a special kind of curve called the Bezier Curve. You will also start an art project that you will continue to work on throughout the course. This project will involve the creation of a still life scene depicting a glass, a decanter, and a bowl of fruit.

Shape and Form

In this unit, you will explore the use of shapes and forms in art. Using Inkscape, you will create different types of shapes. You will also continue with your art project, adding shapes and forms to your still life.

Color

In this unit, you will learn how color is related to light and how color is used in art. You will use Inkscape’s color sliders to practice using color. You will also continue with your art project, adding grapes and colors to your still life.

Value

In this unit, you will learn how value, or the lightness or darkness of a color, is used in art. Using Inkscape, you will create a color value scale. You will also continue with your art project, adding value to your still life through highlights.

Space

In this unit, you will explore how space and perspective is used in art. Using Inkscape, you will draw two-dimensional objects that look three-dimensional. You will also continue with your art project. You will add a table and book to your still life to create the illusion of 3D space.

Texture

In this unit, you will explore how texture is used in art. You will create different textures using Inkscape’s filters. You will also complete your art project by adding texture to different parts of your still life.

2 thoughts on “GRADE 8 (Middle School): K to 12 Curriculum Guide – National Connections Academy

  1. Pingback: Where K to 10 is BETTER than K to 12 » MULTILINGUAL PHILIPPINES

  2. Pingback: Where K to 10 is BETTER than K to 12 | Multilingual Philippines

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