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‘Castrated’ MTB-MLE

Dr. Ricardo Nolasco

Dr. Ricardo Nolasco

By Ricardo Ma. Duran Nolasco, PhD
Philippine Daily Inquirer
Friday, September 13th, 2013
(rnolasco_upmin@yahoo.com)
Associate Professor, UP Department of Linguistics

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The term “castration” refers to the removal, by surgical or other means, of the reproductive organ of an animal. The intention is to prevent the animal from spreading an “undesired” genetic trait in succeeding generations.

This is precisely what the implementing rules and regulations of Republic Act No. 10533 (otherwise known as the K-to-12 Law) appear to be doing to the Mother Tongue-Based Multilingual Education (MTB-MLE) provisions of the original law.

The IRR provide, albeit illegally, foreign and local lobbyists of the discredited bilingual-education policy with enough escape clauses for them to continue defying the law.

This introductory clause in Rule II, 10.4 circumscribes all the other language provisions: “The curriculum shall develop proficiency in Filipino and English, provided that the learners’ first and dominant language shall serve as the fundamental language of education.”

This provision, absent in the original law, confirms suspicions that the government’s language-in-education policy is MTB-MLE in name but L2 bilingual education in practice.

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DepEd Order 31 s. 2013 & DepEd Order 31 s. 2012 Contravene MTB-MLE Provisions of RA 10533

DepEd Sec. Armin Luistro

DepEd Sec. Armin Luistro

Secretary Armin Luistro’s Department of Education, through his directives and the RA 10533 Implementing Rules and Regulations (IRR) issued on September 4, 2013, are bent on subverting the intent of the Enhanced Basic Education Act of 2013.

Sec. 4 of RA 10533, otherwise known as “AN ACT ENHANCING THE PHILIPPINE BASIC EDUCATION SYSTEM BY STRENGTHENING ITS CURRICULUM AND INCREASING THE NUMBER OF YEARS FOR BASIC EDUCATION, APPROPRIATING FUNDS THEREFOR AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES“, provides that:

“Basic education shall be delivered in languages understood by the learners as the language plays a strategic role in shaping the formative years of learners.

“For kindergarten and the first three (3) years of elementary education, instruction, teaching materials and assessment shall be in the regional or native language of the learners. The Department of Education (DepED) shall formulate a mother language transition program from Grade 4 to Grade 6 so that Filipino and English shall be gradually introduced as languages of instruction until such time when these two (2) languages can become the primary languages of instruction at the secondary level.”

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RA 10533 and DepEd’s Misinterpretations thru DO 31 s. 2013 & the IRRs

Subject: Your comment re DepEd and RA 10533 IRRs
From: Joe Padre (joepadre@att.net)
To: rnolasco_upmin@yahoo.com;
Cc: ched.arzadon@gmail.com; aurelioagcaoili@yahoo.com; rvaragon@gmail.com; tawidnews@yahoo.com; erroldiaryo@yahoo.com; jimmyagpaloii@yahoo.com; sherma.e.benosa@gmail.com; nelsondaligcon@gmail.com;
Date: Wednesday, September 4, 2013 5:59 PM
DepEd Sec. Armin Luistro

DepEd Sec. Armin Luistro

Dear Rick,

Your comments re DepEd and the new IRRs for RA 10533 reinforced my suspicion about what DepEd is about to do:

“Ricardo Ma Nolasco: You may want to know what DepEd is really up to, when they approved the IRR yesterday. Focus your attention on Rule II, 10.2, 10.3 and 10.4. (1) The first sentence in Rule II, 10.4 circumscribes all the other provisions. Ibig sabihin, balik na naman tayo sa discredited bilingual policy. This to me is not MTB-MLE:

“The curriculum shall develop proficiency in Filipino and English, provided that, the learners’ first and dominant language shall serve as the fundamental language of education.

Comment:  MTB-MLE under our country’s concrete conditions should promote the development of proficiency in the first language  AND the two official languages, as well as other languages of wider communication.  It appears that the formulation here in the IRR views the first language merely as bridge to learning the two official languages.

For Kindergarten and the first three years of elementary education, instruction, teaching materials, and assessment shall be in the regional or native language of the learners.

Implementing Rules and Regulations of the Enhanced Basic Education Act of 2013

IMPLEMENTING RULES AND REGULATIONS

OF THE ENHANCED BASIC EDUCATION ACT OF 2013

(REPUBLIC ACT NO. 10533)

kto12.jpgPursuant to Section 16 of Republic Act No. 10533, entitled “An Act Enhancing the Philippine Basic Education System by Strengthening Its Curriculum and Increasing the Number of Years for Basic Education, Appropriating Funds Therefor and for Other Purposes,” otherwise known as the “Enhanced Basic Education Act of 2013,” approved on May 15, 2013, and which took effect on June 8, 2013, the Department of Education (DepEd), the Commission on Higher Education (CHED), and the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA), hereby issue the following rules and regulations to implement the provisions of the Act.

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Pres. Aquino signs Enhanced Basic Education Act

“For kindergarten and the first three (3) years of elementary education, instruction, teaching materials and assessment shall be in the regional or native language of the learners. The Department of Education (DepED) shall formulate a mother language transition program from Grade 4 to Grade 6 so that Filipino and English shall be gradually introduced as languages of instruction until such time when these two (2) languages can become the primary languages of instruction at the secondary level.”

Pres. Aquino signing Enhanced Basic Education Act

Pres. Aquino signing Enhanced Basic Education Act

MANILA, Philippines—President Benigno Aquino on Wednesday morning signed into law the Enhanced Basic Education Act of 2013, mandating kindergarten and adding two years to secondary education to place the country’s curriculum on par with international standards.

The President said Republic Act 10533, widely known as the K to 12 Act, would “lay the foundations for a better future for every Filipino child.”

“Our people’s unwavering support has allowed us to make this vision a reality: to establish a system of education that truly imbues our youth with the skills they need to pursue their dreams,” Aquino told lawmakers, Cabinet officials, diplomats and students in Malacañang.

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